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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"

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ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 ^est Superior Street. 



Miiiii. llidtorcal 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 




FOR BARGAINS 

— 8KE— 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDINQ. 



VOL. 7; NO. 242. 



DULUTH, MINN., THUBSi3AY, JANUAKY 16, 1890. 





Do !ou Want to Borrow Money? LAST 



PBIC£ THB£E CENTS. 



\ 



K 



We can let you have it and without delay. 

MONEY ON HAND 



Provided you have sufficient security. 



LOOKING FOR HIM HERE. 



Searching for a Recreant Hus- 
band Who Has Conne to 
Duluth. 



rr 



Ouf Rates m the Lowest 




,( 

f 



1^ 



i»n ■ mi 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 

DUtUTH, WEST DULUTH OR WEST SUPERIOR 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



Daughter of a Prominent PittS' 

burger, She is Left 

Alone. 



Kirkland Wins a Suit Touch 
the Beaver Silver 
. Mine. 



EXECU TED TODAY. 

Two Negroes and Seven Indiana Were Hang 
In AikaniuM Toflay. 

Fort Smith, Ark., Jan. 16. — The 
namea of the nine men to be executed 
here today are Charles Ballard Knd 
Charles Tabler, negroes; Harry Aiistio, 
half breed; John Hilly, Tom WiUig, xMad- 
ison James, Jefferson James, Samuel 
Gaers and Jamison Burris,- full-blooded 
Indiana All were uonviuted of murders 
committed in Indian Territory within 
one year. 

For two weeks past the hanKman, 
George Maledon, has been preparing for 
his extraordinary job. Nine ropes were 
prepared and stretched daily with dum- 
mies. The trap is long enough to accom- 
modate all the condemned men and drop 
them through at once. Since their con- 
viction all the prisoners have be^n cal- 
lous, laughing and joking about their 
doom. Ballard, however, entertained 
hopes of a commutation from the Presi- 
dent up to the last moment. 



BALLOT BOX FORGERIES. 



The 



ing 



URGE - OR - SMIILL - 




L. 



We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 

SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 



A> 



Real Estate, Acres and Business Pioperty a Specialty. 

Gall and see what we have. 



FIRE 



INSURANCE. 



The best Foreign and American Companies rep 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 





LOUIS LENA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 26 
West Superior street, has opened at 



28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



Cincinnati, O., Jan. 16. — Something 
over a week ago a woman, claiming to be 
Mrs. Joseph Moore, arrived in this city 
and bought a saloon at Seventh and 
Plum streets, a disreputable dive fre- 
quented by negroes, criminals and the 
lowest fallen women. It was evident to 
the most casual observers that she had 
known better days. Tuesday she sold 
the saloon, which cost her |(>10, for :J125 
and started for Duluth. 

She says that five years ago in^Pitts- 
burg she married Joseph M(X)re. She 
was then Miss Belle Lowrj-, daughter of 
a prominent citizen, who had been 
twice elected mayor of the Smoky City. 
She was delicately raised and carefully 
educated. The man she married was 
an expert mechanic, and though her 
parents opposed the union, they pros- 
pered. Considerable proi)erty was accu- 
mulated on the North side in Indianap- 
olis and also at Knightstown. 

Ten weeks a>,'o her husband told her 
he desired t<"> go into liusinoss and asked 
her to sell some lotjs held jointly by 1ier 
self and him. She did so, and he. with 
several hundred dollars, disapj)eared. 
First Mrs. Moore believed her husband 
the victim of foul play or accident, Vjut 
8cx)n learned he had deserted her. 

She disptised of 83000 worth of prop- 
erty and started in pursuit, confident 
that if she could find him all would be 
weir. She followed him to Albuquerque. 
Denver, Ogden and here. At this jKiint 
her funds became low, and in des[>era- 
tion she bought the saloon which she 
sold this morning. She is going to Du 
luth, where she has heard her recreant 
husljand is. 

A man known only as J. Moore came 
to Duluth about five weeks ago and al- 
most immediately afterward secured em- 
ployment with Iron Car company at 
West Duluth as an assistant foreman in 
one of the departments. He was called 
"Joe" by the common consent of the 
workmen with whom he was brought in 
contact, and was classed as a superior 
workmen. He called for his time two 
days ago and left immediately afterward. 
His present whereabouts are not known. 
Mrs. Moore is stopping in the East End 
of the city with acquaintances. She ar- 
rived this afternoon. 






THE BEAVER. 



,With a complete stock of 




rted and Domestic Cigars 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Fine Cut aod Plug Tobaccos, Etc, 



Kirkland Wins In One Tilt in the .Several 
iSuitH About the Mine. 
Milwaukee, Jan. IG. — An injunction 
asked for a peculiar purpose in the fam- 
ous mining suit of F. S. Kirkland 
against R, G. Peters, has been denied by 
Judge Jenkins. 

In Gctober, 1888, Frank S. Kirkland 
of Duluth, began action in the United 
States court against Richard G. Peters, 
the millionaire lumberman and salt man 
of Manistee, Mich., to recover one- 
fourth of the net proceeds from the 
operation and sale of the celebrated 
Beaver mine in the Thunder Bay dis- 
trict, 120 miles north of Duluth, in Can- 
ada, which he claimed to have discov- 
ered and transferred to the defendant 
under an agreement which the latter 
afterward refused to comply with. 

The suit involved several hundred 
thousand dollars, and the possession of 
large tracts of land in northern Minne- 
sota, Wisconsin and other places. In 
October, 1889, Mr. Peters came t<j this 
to be examined in the suit, and while he 
was here he was served with a summons 
in a second suit, brought in the circuit 
court of Milwaukee county, by Mr. Kirk- 
land, and for the purpose of obtaining an 
accounting of the Wisconsin land deal. 
Uhe defendant made attidavit to United 
States court that lands in the second 
suit were identical with those involved 
in the first suit, and that suit in the state 
court was brought only to harass and 
annoy him. He therefore asked that the 
plaintifT be perpetually enjoined from 
prosecuting the uecond suit. A hearing 
was had in October, and a temporary in- 
junction was granted, but in the decision 
just made. Judge Jenkins refused to 
make injunction i>ermanent. 



St. Lofis, Mo., Jan. IC— Following is 
the history of the crimes for which thf se 
six men suffer: The murder for whu-h 
Austin paid so dearly today was one '»f 
an unpardonable nature, atrtxsious h; 
unj)rovoked. On the 25th of May, Is- 
in Chickjisaw Nation, he killed Thomas 
Elliott, a white man. Elliott had been 
in the Indian country alx>ut two mouths 
and was a stranger to Austin. Jonas 
I'earson, a half brother of Austin, was 
under the intiuence of liquor on the day 
of the murder, aud Elliott accused him 
of having stolen some whisky from 
him. The two men were sitting 
on the front porch, Pearson 
l)eing armed. Austin approached theui 
and took Pearson's pistol from him. The 
two walked a short distance, conversed a 
few moments in the English language 
and then Austin turned and, approach- 
ing Elliott, shot him in the breast. El- 
liott fell when the murderer shot him a 
second time, then he walked up close to 
his prostrate and dying victim and shot 
him in the forehead, holding his pistol 
so close that the face of the murdered 
man was badly powder burned. 

John Billy, Thomas Willis and Madi- 
son James were all convicted jointly of 
the murder. The principal wit- 
ness was another Indian named 
Ciraham. He testified that Williams 
fell in with three condemned men and 
sold them some whiskey, all getting 
drunk. Williams bad more whiskey but 
the Indians had no more money and he 
refused to give tbem any. Williamo 
finally accused them of stealing some of 
his whiskey, and Graham, anticipating 
trouble induced him to leave. When a 
short distance away the three defend 
ants started after them, and Willis fired 
at Williams with a Winchester, shooting 
him through the body. 

Madison James' sentence was commuted 
to imjirisonment in the penitentiary for 
fifteen years. Sam Goin and Jimmon 
Burris, full bl<xxl Choctaws, were tried 
in October, Jim (ioin also being a de- 
fenchint in the case, but he was acquit 
ted while the others were found guilty. 
The victim of these men was Houston 
Joyce of Franklin, Texas. On the 27th 
of November, 1888, he was traveling 
thmugh the Indian country and stopped 
at the house of Jim Croin, and the uncle 
of Sam in Toson i«unty, Choctaw nation, 
for dinner. In paying for it he exposed 
his money, and on leaving he was put on 
a blind trail by Jim Burris, and after he 
got out of sight, Goin gave Burris antl 
Sam (roin his guns and told them to 
kill the white man. Tliey murdered 
him in a lonely and unfrequented sjwt, 
t<K)k i)ossession of his horse and 
what money and other property he had. 
Jefferson Jones, a full-blooded Choc- 
taw, was convicted on the 11th of October, 
his victim being a man Go years of age, 
named Henry Wilson. On the 12th of 
March last the old man started on foot 
from a point near Latlofe, his destina- 
tion being Polk county. Ark. His way 
lay through the Winding Stair mount- 
ains. One week went by and then an- 
other, but no tidings came from the old 
man. His sons went in search of him. 
They could trace him as far as Isaac 
Winton's, where he stopped the first 
night, but after leaving there no trace 
of him could be found. The mountains 
were scoured with like results. Then 
the case was reported to the United 
States authorities here, and Deputy Mar- 
shal Barnhill was sent out to search for 
the missing man. He found the gun car- 
ried by Wilson at the house of George 
Beams. He procured the arrest of 
Beams, who said Jefferson Jones had 
kille<l a white man and left the gun at 
his house. Jefferson was arrested and 
acknowledged the whole thing. 

GOOD ENOUGH AS IT IS. 
Oppoitltlon lu the Aniendiuent to the 



Investigation of the Ohio 
Forgeries Proceeds 
Today. 



The 



Senate Discusses 
Emigration of 
Negro. 



the 



the 



Washington, Jan. IC.— The special 
house committee ai>pointed to investi- 
gate the Ohio ballot box forgery, began 
its work this morning. Chairman Mason 
laid before the committee a communica- 
tion, signed by Senators Sherman, Stock- 
bridge and McPheraon and Representa 
lives liutterworth, Breckenridge (Ken 
tucky ). McKinley and Justir R. Whit- . 
og, reciting that as it is desirable to 
have a full and impartial investigation, 
Iteprusentative ( Jrosvenor be summoned 
before the committee to aid in the ex- 
amination of witnesses. 

Representative McKinley was a wit- 
ness today. Chairman presented a paper 
dated July 2, 1888, and asked if witness 
had over seen it and whether the name 
of "Wdliam McKinley, Jr.," signed 
thereto was by him. 

He said he saw a paper like it for the 
first time just before congress met. It 
was shown to him by Representative 
Butterworth. The name was not his 
signature. He knew nothing about the 
matter, except what he had seen in the 
newspapers, and never heard of a ballot- 
box bill until it was brought to light in 
the last campaign. He knew nothing of 
the motive that impelled the forgery. 
He saw a fac simile of the paper pub- 
lished in The Cincinnati Commercial 
Gazette, signed by J. E, Campbell alone.' 
It was afterwards published in ottfer 
and local republican papers. He had no 
interest in the paper and never had any 
relations with Mr. Wood, and did not re- 
call that he had ever heard of him, or 
the ballot box matter until he saw the 
publication. 

In his speech at Cencinnati Sept. 28, 
Governor Foraker produced a copy of the 
ballot box bill and that was the first he 
had heard of the subject. Governor 
Foraker, at that time made no reference 
to the contract, but subsequently the 
contract and subscription was pub- 
lished. 

Amor Smith, surveyor of customs of 
Cincinnati, was shown the forged paper 
which ne had first seen Oct. G last. Wit- 
ness said when it was shown him he be- 
lieved it a forgery, but consented to de- 
liver it to Mr. Halstead, which he did, 
with the statement that he did not be- 
lieve it to be genuine. After the expose 
the witness learned that Mr. Halstead 
had seen the paper before. Ex-(jrov- 
ernor Foraker took the stand and was 
shown the forged paper. He said he had 
no personal knowledge of who executed 
the paper. 



WALKER BLAINE DEAD. 

The Grip's Host Noted Amerlfun Victim 
Uled Last Night. 

Washington, Jan. 16.— Walker Blaine, 
the eldest son of Secretary Blaine and 
solicitor of the state department, died 
last evening of acute pneumonia, in the 
35th year of his age. Around his death 
bed were Secretary Blaine, Mrs. Blaine, 
his brothers Emmons and James, and 
Miss Dixlge. Mr. Walker Blaine was 
taken ill with a cold last Friday and was 
so much indisposed that he never came 
to his office afterward. His cold de- 
veloi>ed into pneumonia which rapidly 
became worse. He was not thought to 
be in a critical condition until yesterday 
when his Hym[)tom8 would not' yield to 
treatment. 

Walker Blane graduated from Vale in 
187G, and received his law diploma from 
Columbia in 1878. In 1881 Garfield ap- 
pointeil him third aasistank secretary of 
state, saying that he appre<;iate<l ' his 
ability and desired to show it. After 
serving in this capacity, ho was at)- 
pointed on the Alabama "claims commis- 
sion, where he served from 1882 to 1885. 
On the advent of the present administra- 
tion he was apiwinted solicitor of the 
state department, a position which he 
alai filled with great credit and abilitv. 

The funeral of Mr. Walker Blaine wi'll 
take place from the Church of the Cove- 
nant next Saturday at 11 a. in. The in- 
terment will \)e at Oak Hill cemeterv. 



The senate has passed a concurrent 
resolution reported from the committee 
on finance, requesting the secretary of 
the treasury not to take any steps toward 
a new lease of the seal fisheries until 
after Feb. 20. 



Another. 

Newark, O., Jan. IG.— Hon. John A. 
Lawlow, representative-elect, died at ten 
minutes past 9 o'ckxjk this morning. 

MANAGER DUDL EY DEAD. 

The Yii-(>.l>reKi<lent »nd nunaser of the 

.St, l»aul & Uuliith a Vitllui. 

Col. Ethelbort L. Dudley, vice-presi- 
dent and general manager of the St. 
Paul & Duluth railway, died at his 
rooms in the Hotel Ryan at 10:30 last 
evening. He was stricken with laryn- 
geal paralysis a week ago and gradually 
grew worse until last night, the disease 
developing into apoplexy. 

Col. Dudley was born in Danville, Ky., 
Jan. 16, 1845, and has been in the rail 
way service since 1867. He was with the 
St. Louis. Iron Mountain & Southern 
from 1870 to 1882, going next to the 
Texas & Pacific, first as superintendent 
and then as general manager. In 188G 
he became general manager of the Cen- 
tral Iowa and in 1888 general manager 
of the St. Paul & Dnluth. He was with 
Col. R. S. Hayes in the Southwest and 
when the latter became president of the 
St. Paul & Duluth he brought Dudley 
with him from the Central Iowa. 

At his death bed were his son Harry, 
his sister Mrs. L. D. Garth, of St. Louis; 
his niece, Mrs. Von Wedelsteadt, Dr. N. 
B. Carson, of St. Louis, his family physi- 
cian, and Col. R S. Hayes of Philadel- 
phia, president of the road. The body 
was taken to St. Louis today, where the 
funeral ceremonies will be held. He 
was forty-five years old today. 

In the death of Col. Dudley, the Union 
Depotj company loses its president. 
President Hayes of the Duluth road, will 
|)robably lx> elected to the position. 

PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS PAY. 



"MISS BLY THE." 

She wait a Clalrroyaut And Duped Poor 

LambtlH In Jail. 

ToLEno, Jan. 16.— Today's develop- 
ments ii the now noted forgery case 
tend to show that Lamb, the express 
cashier, who negotiated the notes sup- 
posed to be forged, was made a dupe of 
by Madi me Devere, a clairvoyant who 
has figu led here, at Cleveland and at 
Painesvi He under different aliases. She 
admits taat she has passed under the 
name o' Florida ii. Blythe, who is 
named a J the payee in one of the notes. 

She told a lawyer here, who was called 
in to ti ansact some legal business for 
her several months ago, that it is her 
real name. A queer complication is that 
there ap )ears to be another Florid^ G. 
Blythe, t, lady of excellent reputation, in 
Clevelani, but there appears no connec- 
tion betv^een her and the Toledo woman. 

Lamb and Madame Devere were both 
arrested late last night on the charge of 
forgery. Their bail was fixed at $500 
each. Limb secured this after mid- 
butMadime Devere is still behind the 
bars. 

GOES DOWN. 

A Telegrniph Conipauy'it riant Sold by the 
Sherift'. 

New York, Jan. 16. -The following 
circular was sent out this morning. It 
is understood that the postal Telegraph 
company was the purchaser, and no tel- 
egrams Mere sent out this morning. 

Nfw Yjkk, Jan. 15, 1800. To all sub- 
scribers cf the Commercial Telegraph 
company The Commercial Telegraph 
company is compelled to announce that 
the propf rty heretofore operated by it 
has been sold at sheriff's sale, to satisfy 
judgemeiits against the company, and it 
now finde itself unable to continue todis 
tribute, after this date, the <juotations 
which hat'e heretofore been supplied to 
its custot lers. 

George W. Casp ek, Secy. 
A C;ity iSaved. 

Brockton, Mass. Jan. 16.— A four 
story building lielonging to (Jardner 
Bros., on Center street, was destroyed 
by fire th s morning. At one time it 
looked as though the entire business 
portion ol the city would be destroyed, 
and aid vas asked from surrounding 
towns, but before it arrived, fiames had 

been brought under control. Loss about ^t, 

^60,000. I block. 



TO POLL ITS STRENGTH. 
Steadtaot Temperance t'nionera Greeted by 
the General OfficerK. 
Chicack), Jan. IG.— The general of»- 
cers of the W. C. T. U. have issued a cir- 
cular extending their greetings to the 
non-seceding white ribboners of the 
Iowa W. C. T. U., inviting all who are 
with the national in its policy of "No 
sectarianism in religion, no sectionalism 
in politics, no sex in citizenship, but 
each and all of us tor prohibition by con- 
stituti^onal amendments, national and 
state," to hold meetings locally and pass 
resolutions to this effect. 



E..K 



An HiHtoric Ham. 

Gi>ofcE.sTEU, Mass., Jan. 16. — Veoter- 
day a barn on the old Pierce farm, now 
owDed by Osman Ivabson, was burned. 
The building destroyed was an histori- 
cal one. It was built about the year 
1780 as the first Universalist church in 
.Vmerica, its pastor being Rev. John 
Merry. The centennial of Universalism 
in America was held in 1880 and thou- 
sands of Universalists who attended that 
gathering, visited this old barn as the 
Mecca of liberal Christianity. 

Making Harvard Provincial. 

Boston, Jan. 16. — The athletic com- 
mittee of Harvard has decided after the 
close of the season of 1889 90 that Har- 
vard shall not participate in anv athletic 
sports outside of New England. 

A NEW ASSO CIATION. 

Tlie Duluth Itealty InvcHtinent Asaocia- 
tion i!< Organized Here. 

Articles of incorporatin will be filed in 
a day or two of the Duluth Realty In- 
vestment association, a corporation or- 
ganized to carry on a legitamate real es- 
tate business. Its capital stock is IIOO,- 
000, and its time of continuance thirty 
years, from February Ist. The com- 
pany is composed of well known, suc- 
cessful and popular business men. Its 
ofticers and board of direct<}rs are as fol- 
lows: J. K. Shaw, president; S. C. Max- 
well, vice-president; Z. U. .\ustin, sec- 
retary; R. Crombie, treasurer; S" T. Har- 
rison, attorney; there-with the following 
are directors and incorporators; Simon 
Clark, W. S. Albertson, A. M. Morison. 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 



Laige and Stylish Stock 



-OF- 



a 



Mr. Butler, in the senate, made a speeh 
on his bill to provide for the emigration 
of the negroes of the South, at the gov 
ernment's expense and appropriating 
^5,000,000 to carry out the bill. At the 
conclusion of Senator Butler's remarks, 
Senator Pasco gave notice that he would 
address the senate upon the question of 
federal control of presidential elections 
and then Senator Hor took the floor to 
respond to Mr. Butler. 



DEATH REMO VES A 
A NotorlouH 



CHARACTER. 



in La Porte 



Na- 




Don't forget the number, 



28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 






LOUIS 



LENA. 



WELLS, F ARGO ROBBED. 

The Strong Box in Their Otfice Myittcri- 
onitly DiKappeant. 

Dalla-s, Texas, Jan. 16.— It leaked out 
today that Wells, Fargo & Co. 'a office in 
this city was yesterday robbed of igll.OOO. 
The police and detective force of the 
city are at work on the case, but s<j far 
as learned have secured no definite clew. 

Yesterday the employes locked up the 
office, front and rear, and went to dinner, 
leaving the strong box in the front of- 
fice, and when they returned it was 
gone. There are various theories nd« 
vanced that account for the disappear- 
ance of the box, but nothing definite is 
known. The officials maintain their 
usual reticence, although thev atlmit 
that the box is missing. They hopetl at 
first that it had merely been misssent, 
but this theory has been dissipated by 
telegrams sent to overtake all outgoing 
trains. 



tional ConHtitutlon. 

Madlson, Wis., Jan. 16.— Advices re- 
ceived here from different parts of the 
state indicate that the proposed amend- 
ment to the national constitution recog- 
nizing the deity in that instrument is 
meeting with considerable opposition, 
and that a formidable protest against 
the proposal will be sent from Wisconsin 
to the national capital. Even clergymen 
of several denominations are circulating 
petitions in opposition, on the ground 
that the proposal is an interference with 
religious belief, and that the constitution 
is good eno ugh as it now stan ds. 

American Sport*— Rngliiih floodle. 

New Vokk, Jan. 16.— The statement 
in a cable dispatch of yesterday that 
"Parson" Davies had sailed with Jack- 
son is incorrect. Davies sailed a week 
ago and is due in this city tomorrow. 
Jackson is accompanied by a small party 
of the sporting fraternity. A letter re- 
ceived from London today says that 
after payinjr all expenses, Jackson has 
ft£i,(XX) to show for his English visit, 
while Davies is a winner to the extent of 
no less than 1.35,000, a single benefit 
given him by the aristocratic patrons of 
the ring netting $12,500. 

Non-Partifuin Temperance Women. 

PuiLADELj'HtA, Jan. 16.— In response 
to a call signed by Mrs. Harry White, 
Indiana; Mrs. M. S. Shepard, Ohio and 
several others, an interstate convention 
of non-partisan Christian temperance 
women opened today in the hall of the 
American Stfndav School union. There 
is a large attenJInce and the endorse- 
ment of the proposed Non partisan Nb- 
tional union is assured. 



Woman Ute* 
Jail. 

La Poktk, Ind., Jan. 16.— Ella Wassar- 
man, who created a sensation several 
months ago by making a murderous as- 
sault on Mrs. Minnie Leeds, of Michigan 
City, died in the county jail today of 
ulceration of stomach. She was born of 
respectable parents near Maxwell, Iowa, 
but had been living under an assumed 
name. She was a wayward girl but was 
a women of more than ordinary charac- 
ter and out of respect of her relatives 
refused to allow her identity to become 
public when she got into trouble, and 
died with her secret imparted only to 
her attorney. 

By her death one of the most sensa- 
tional and mysterious cases is removed 
from court that has ever been in this 
country, as it affected one of the promi- 
nent society men of Michigan City. A 
telegram from the erring woman's 
brother orders her remains to be in- 
terred here for the present. 



New \ork'« Court Handn Down an Opinion 
to That Kfl'ect. 

Albany, N. Y., Jan. 16.— The court of 
ni)peals. Judge Earl writing the opinion, 
in a decision t<jday holds that parochial 
schools are not exempt from taxation. 
The St. Monica churcFi used a l)uilding 
in New York as a jiarish school, and the 
contention was that it belonged to the 
church and was exempt from taxation. 
The city government levied an assess- 
ment on it, the same as on other real 
property. The supreme court held that 
the assessment was invalid. This ruling 
was reversed by the court of appeals, 
and the complaint is dismissed. The 
opinion says: 

"It cannot be supposed that it was the 
legislative intention that any number of 
jjersons could come together for some 
religious purjjose could set up a school 
and then claim exemption. Using the 
words 'religious, society' it is most prob- 
able that the lawmakers had in mind 
some legal entity capable as such of tak- 
ing and holding property and popularly 
known as religious society. We, there- 
fore, are of the opinion that upon the 
facts found the plaintilf was not entitled 
t« the relief claimed." 



CLOAKS 



-AND- 



SUMMONEO TO ROME. 

ArclibiHhop Corrigau to Leave Saturday; 
Keception Given Uini Tonight, 

New York, Jan. 16. — Archbishop 
Corrigan sails for Rome on Saturday. 
When the f.'icc that the noted prelate 
had been summoned to the Vatican was 
first announced in these dispatches in 
November last it evoked a "semi-official" 
denial, but later developments have dem- 
onstrated that the statement was well 
founded. It is e<iually a fact that the 
Vatican is far from being well satisfied 
with the administration of affairs in 
the diocese of New York, and that the 
troubles with Dr. McGlynn, Dr. Birdstall 
and other priests of former prominence, 
will be gone over and thoroughly venti- 
lated while the archbishop is at Rome. 
A farewell reception is to be given to the 
prelate tonight at the cathedral, for 
which 3,000 invitations have been issued.' 
Frederick R. Coudert will be the orator 
of the evening. 



HEG GETS A NEST, 

Puddlng- 



Who 



WiMconHin'i* Oemocrata, 

Milwaukee, Jan. 16.— Edward C. Wall 
of this city was elected chairman of the 
democratic state central committee yes- 
terday to succeed Ellis Usher, La Crosse, 
who recently resigned. 

Influenza Carries Off Kleven. 

Chicago, Jan. 16.^Report8 received at 
the health office are not of an encourag- 
ing nature, eleven of the eighty-seven 
death certificates which were returned, 
having the word "influenza" as the cause 
of death. 



Chill] ren'it Garmentit 

At auction in the St. Louis old dining- 
room. Sale from 2 to 6 p, m. and 7 to 9 
p. m. 



In Fact Mr. Heg Getn a 
1h Heg? 

Collector H. B. Moore today received 
a letter from the treasury department 
notifying him that James E. Heg hacl 
been appointed "immigration inspector" 
at Duluth, His official duties will con- 
sist of the arduous task of "aiding in the 
enforcement of the provisions of the 
alien contract labor laws," and he will be 
under the direction of the collector of 
customs. 

Mr. Heg will receive *4 per day, or 
isl4(j0 per year, and all expense.^, in fact 
this new official will have a regular pic- 
nic. Mr. Heg is unknown here but is 
believed to hail from the Red River 
valley. 



Hutter! Butter! 

Choice creamery and dairy butter at 
Clark & Metz. 



REA L EST ATE. 

A Keconl of the Keal Kntate 'f ramtfer* for 
'4i Honrit Ending at Noon. 

J U Howard to H M Hunter, nwf* of 
section :i.=i: n!4se>4, JT-fc-'-ia; uw!4 of 
Hection*); 8W>^,li»-62-ll ) 

MiiiDeHota Iron company to Hobart Gll- 
marlt. e'i lot 13, blocli », Tower 

8u8uii B Mogoliooni to Mary F Marvin. 
t»'i. as-rii-ii 

Daniel B Walker to Mary F Marvin, e4, 

a»-6i-u 

Mary F Marvin to W E Lucas, e>/,, aj-Bl- 
14 

Jobn Friborg to Nils K Friborg, e'^ lot 
69, East Sixth street. First division, 
Duluth proper 

Christopher FraiUc to Nils K Frlberg, 
w' , lot 59. East Sixth street, Duluth 
propi-r 

Charles K Htuiey to Wardwell Ames, 
«e'*, li»-|-.l-15 

William p WalJter to Mary F Marvin, 
e'i, 10-61-15 

D D McLuin to WardwoU Ames. sck. ll>- 
61-15 

Joel Colby to John M MlUor, so^ of 
nwH. ttsiO-1.1 .* 



4,4S0 

'.too 
1 

3.000 
7,500 



2,600 



2,000 

1 

1 

1 

12,000 



11 transfers ; coneideration t30,681 

Do You Want Cloaks. 

Big auction sale at St. Louis' old dio- 
iogroom, commencing Saturday at 2 to 
6 p. m., and 7 tod p. m. , 



THREE HU NDRED EVICTED. 

High Water in Lower Illinois Drives 
People Out. 

Cairo, 111., Jan. 16.— Three hundred 
peoi)le at Carnie have been comjjelled to 
leave their houses by the sudden rise in 
the little Wabash river, and it is feared 
that a still larger number will Ije forced 
to abandon tlveir dwellings and take 
refuge on the high ground to escape the 
water, which is expected to sweep down 
from the swollen tributaries into the 
river. 

Carnie is about 100 miles north of 
here, off the Cairo and Vincennes road. 
The river is out of its banks, and the 
north part of the town is overflowed to a 
depth of twenty-tive feet in some places, 
and from seventy-five to 100 houses are 
submerged. Houses have all been 
vacated, and people are seeking refuge 
in the spare nx)ms t)f their neighbors. 

FARMERS EN DORS E LARRABEE. 

Iowa Farmers Alliance Wants Governor 
Larrabee for ilenator. 

Des Moink-s, Jan. 16. — Governor Lar- 
rabee wjis last night endorsed by the 
Iowa Farmers Alliance for Unitod States 
senator, to succeed Senator Allison. The 
Farmers Alliance claims to be a non- 
partisan organization. A committee was 
appointed to present its nomination ta 
the republican senatorial caucus. An 
other committee at once paid Governor 
Larraliee a visit and stated to him the 
action <jf the convention. They made 
no rejxjrt last night, but will report this 
afternoon. One of the members of tlie 
committee has intimated that their visit 
to the governor was in every respect 
satisfactory. 

A Gladstone Gets Damages. 

tiONDON, Jan. 16.— Col. Mallison has 
been convicted of publishing in The Al- 
lahabad f India) Post a libel against Her- 
bert Glaastone, son of the Right Hon. 
W. E. (Jladstone and has been ordered 
to paj .iSlOOO pounds damages. 

A Liberaliht Dies. 

London, Jan. 16.— Alexander Craig 
Sellar, Liberal unionist member of the 
House of Commons for Bartick division, 
Lanarkshire, is dead. He was one of 
the most active Liberal unionists. 



-;- Cliiien's Garments -:- 



TO BE SOLD AT 



AUCTION ! 



IN THE 



ST. - LOOK - OLD - 




COMMENCING 



i 



SATURDAY, JAN. 18, 



At 2 to 6 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M. 



,i 



'. 



- ' 



J. M. BECKMAN 



AUCTIONEER. 



That European "Peace," 
St. Pktersucrg, Jan. 16. — A resirpt 
addressed t<j the governor of Moscow, 
hiis been issued by the Czar. His ma- 
jestv says: "As we enter 1890 I pray 
(lod that the development of the coun- 
try's internal resources may ^b undis- 
turbed amid peace which is flBlversally 
desired and which brings ^tappiness 
to all," 



Children's Garment* 

AX auction in the St. Louis old dining- 
room. Sales from 2 to 6 p, m. and V to 9 



REAL ESTATE 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lois in Endion, $4500. 

2 Lots in Highland Park, $2500. 
20 /i cres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lots adjoining London, cheap. 



■B la 



^ A fevk of the choicest lots in*Murray & Hope's Addition for 
up on es.sy terms. -v 



Twenty acres on the tiW at a great bargain. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Room 0, Metropolitan Block. 



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■VMBi 



DU1.TJTH l^V^ENTN^G HEBALD: JANTTABY 16, 1890. 



EVENING HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD, Publl(h«r. 



PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Dally, by mall, per year $7.00 

Dally, by mail, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mall, per one month 75 

IS THE CITY. 

Oall7, by carrier, per week 18 



Bntered at the postoflSce at Duluth, Minn., as 
Becond-c'la«8 mall matter. 



e^^The Wasbiii^on office of The Herald Is 
at UM New Vork avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kept ou Ule and where The Herald 
corrvsixjiiileut will welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



FOR A COMMON VOICE. 

A well-intended effort is now on foot 
to provide for a generally recognized 
neoil of the various commeroial botlies of 
the country for a central organization 
through which the liK-al bodies iiuiy 
speak and tind .a hearing in matters 
atfectinj,' the production, trade and 09m- 
raerce of the country. The committee 
on extension and representation of the 
national board of trade has been tx'cu- 
pied for »)iue time in considering 
methods for increasiDg the membership 
and intliience of the board and bringing 
local organizations into direct con- 
nection with it. Its inquiries 
show that there are now 520 
commercial organizations with a 
membership of 91.126 members reported 
from fortj"-one states and territories. It 
tlnds that the desire for some appropri- 
ate and effective representation of the 
views ami needs of all is expressed by 
all with whom it has communicated. 

Of some of the chief uses and advan- 
tages of such a medium for consultation, 
concert of action, antl etfecth-e influence 
u{>on public opinion and legislation the 
committee says: "The countrj' is every- 
where raided in the interest of specula- 
tion and unsubstantial scheming to the 
constant ami increasing detriment of or- 
ganized and permanent business opera- 
tions, proilucing uncertainty and dis- 
aster, discontent and demoialization. 
The committee might instance some of 
the great and perplexing ques- 
tions of the day, in the mat- 
ter of trusts,' •pot)ls,' 'combines,' etc.. 
with which legislation as yet does not 
know how to deal — of adulteration and 
misrepresentation, concerning which we 
have scarcely begun to legislate — of 
shipping and tariffs and of bankruptcy 
and uniiication of laws, of socialistic de- 
mands, of taxation, of coinage, of elec- 
tion laws, etc.; all have importance and 
are destined to force themselves upon 
the republic at an early day. They can- 
not be wisely determined without dis- 
cussion and concerted action, and in so 
vast and varied a territoyr. and so 
mixed a population, the beat conclusions 
cannot be reached except through the 
medium of local expression in general 
association. 

This is unquestionably true, but an 
adequate and satisfactory method of in- 
suring co-operation and the effective 
voicing of varying local interests re- 
mains to be designed. No definite plan 
for carrying out these ends has as yet 
been formulated, but the executive 
council of the National Board will meet 
at Washington on the Gth of next month 
and Mr. J. A. Price, of Scranton, Pa., 
chairman of the committee on extension* 
would be glad to communicate, before 
that date, with any local boards, and ob- 
tain an expression of their views and 
such suggestions as they may have to 
offer. The matter is one which our 
Chamber of Commerce may fitly con- 
sider. 



ports to the United States increa.sed 
about .^1,000,000, while exports to Great 
Britain decreased nearly 82.000,000. Im- 
I^M>rts from the Unit«d States increased 
82.000,0a) and from Great Britain 81,000,- 
000. The balance of trade against 
Canada was 832,000.000. The average 
rate of duty collected on British goods 
imfwrted into Canada was 22 per cent, 
wliile the average duty levied upon im- 
ports from the United States was only 
14 i)er cent. This is a conclusive show 
iug of our advantage in competition and 
we trust that no ill-judged action on the 
I><jniinion's part or ours will shake it. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 

dUcu8S 



THEIR INNERMOST THOUGHTS. 



Chas. E. Taft, special agent eleventh 
census: Duluth is a wonderful place. I 
have found many things to admire. The 
air is like a tonic and is as bracing as 
wine. I have been living so much in the 
South that I was thoroughly baked be- 
fore I came North. 

S. L. Merchant: Glad to get back to 
Duluth? Well, I should say I was! 
Business in New York is better than it 
has been for a long time past. I look to 
see remarkable activity in I>uluth dirt 
for the next year. There's a deal of sur- 
plus New Vork cash coming this way 
this year. 

IN RE THE SAULT. 



'llie citizens' meetiojf to discuss school af- 
fairs yesterday afternoon was a thorouKlily 
representative one. It would b« dlflfcult to 
s'.'lcct a more business-like brainy set of men 
than were there conjfregatod. Opinions were 
(riven with a decision and promptitude which 
showed the character ot the men. their realiza- 
tion of the lra|>onance of the purjiost! which 
brought tlicm together and tlie necessity for 
immediate and iutellitrent uction. There was 
no hesitation, tbouKh every Question broujfht 
up was discussed In all Its bearii>gs upon the 
matter in hand, thoroughly and understand, 
inifly. Perhaps the most conspicuous feature 
of the meeting- was the readv eonfldeuce with 
which tlie future was accepted. Each man 
spoke with an assurance of this lieinif a larfre 
city, without any j>eradventure. It is this 
spirit which has built up Duluth to its present 
matrniflccut projHirJLJous, and the same indom- 
itable pluck and energy will see the result ac- 
complished which all are striving for. which. 
In the very nature of things, cannot l>e with- 
held. That Duluth will be a city of luO.iHJO 
people within the next live years, was tiie pre- 
vailing sentiment, not expressed in as many 
words, but the action taken upon the school 
question eiemplifled this view. 
* « * 
"How does it come that I am always found 
unpacking new »rlasses? Well, I'll tell you," 
and the bartender l>egan niLxiag a Tom and 
.lerry. "The glass item In the e-xjienseof 
keeping a bar is no small one. We have at 
least a dozen gitisses broken each day. I know 
more than one man who ha.s a predilection for 
biting pieces out of wine glasses. Such fel- 
lows arc a nuisance, and we always make tiiem 
pay. It's queer, but more sober men break 
glusse'^ than those who are drunk. Another 
thing we have to guard against is sj)oon .steal- 
ing. Who would steal spoons from 
u bamwm? Any number of men! Not 
that such men are conflrmo<l thieves or that 
they steal to sell the results of rascality. I 
know one man, a regular customer of ours. 
Nice old fellow t«o; but he will steal sfxxjns. 
He'll order a drink sent to him, and then 
swear the servaat removed the glass and spoon 
when we call for it. I caught him one day. 
though. He came into the bar r<x)m and or- 
dered a drink. 1 gave It to him with a sixjon 
in the glass. Tlicn I left the rixjm. When I 
came back to the room the spoon was gone. 
But lie's a good customer, and always pays, 
though he don't know it, for the spoons ho 
steals." 



Minneapolis Journal: S«ime pai)ers 
are stirring up the venerable jiroject t)f 
making the Portage lake canal accessible 
to all vessels of Lake Sujierior. There is 
no doubt of the inijHirtance of this out- 
let, and the short cut it t)ffers as against 
the passage around Keweenaw Point. 
But it would Ije l)ett«r for all North- 
western representation to concentrate on 
the appropriation for the Sault. This in 
the matter of paramount commercial 
ini[Mirtance at present. Portage lake can 
wait. Let us have one thing at a time. 
.\tul let the Sault canal be that one 
thing. 

Winona Republican: We in south- 
eastern Minnesota are less dependent 
upon the intiuence of Lake Superior 
than the country to the west and north, 
for we have the Mississippi and our con 
nectioDs with Lake Michigan are close. 
Nevertheless the lines of commerce in 
this entire Northwest are being so mod- 
ified and readjusted by the growth of 
Lake Superior that unbroken communi- 
cation with Duluth will soon become as 
essential to southern Minnesota as with 
Lake Michigan itself. It therefore be- 
hooves Winona to improve the earliest 
opportunity of obtaining such railway 
connection with Duluth its will maintain 
the equality of this city. There is no 
occasion for scouting this suggestion as 
chimerical. The way is already open 
for a new railway through the great 
Chippewa forests, and it requires but 
energy to place Winona in immediate 
contact with the projected movement, 
the consummation of which at no dis- 
tant day, is as certain as the rising of 
tomorrow's sun. 



PROMINENT.PEOOLE. 



Lieut. William E. Whitfield, United 
States navy, died at St. Elizabeths In- 
sane .Vsylum yesterday, aged 37 years. 
He entered the navy in 1870. 

Dr. Henrv A. lowland, professor of 
physics and director of the physical 
lalwratory at the Johns Hopkins univer- 
sity, has l>een elected a member of the 
Royal Society of London. 

Amzi S Dmld of New York, pmpriotor 
of DodilM e.\i>res8, and largely interested 
in baggage and mail trans'portation, is 
dying of brain fever. 

It seems there was a Krst-love romance 
in the life of the Empress Atigusta as 
well as of her husbantl, Empen^r Will- 
iam. Before her marriage she fell in 
love with a dashing young French noble- 
man, but their secret meetings were dis- 
covered, the lover was challenged to a 
duel, and died under the sword of the 
ducal chaml^rlain of Augustas father's 
court. The later marriage of the prin- 
ces.s to William was an affair of the par 
enfs entirely. 

United States Treasurer Huston at 
Washington, who has l>een suffering 
from a severe tiold several days, was com- 
l>elled to take to his bed yesterday. 

Maj. James Pelger, who has been con- 
nected with the railway mail service 
since 1SG7, died yesterday in Jerst>y 
City from di.seases aggravated by a re- 
cent attack of the prevailing epidemic. 

llerr Koch, founder of the postal sav- 
ings banks, died in Germany. 

Mr. Michael C. Henneljerry, commer- 
cial editor of The Cliicago Times for the 
last twenty vears, died vesterdav. 4^ 



Dyspepsia 

Makes the lives of many people miserable, 

causing distress after eating, tjour stomach, 

sick headache, heartburn, losa of appetite, 

a faint, " all gone" feeling, bad t:isto, co.ited 

_ . tongue, and Irregularity of 

Di8trG88 the bowels. Dyspepsia does 

After '*''* set well of Itself. It 

p ^j requires cariAil attention, 

taxing and a remedj like Hood's 

Barsaparilla, which acts gently, yet efficiently. 

It tones the stomach, regulaUss the dlges- 

Uon, creates a good ap- Ciolr 

petite, banishes headache, .^ j . 

and refreshes the mind. HeaCiache 

" I have been troubled with dyspepsia. I 

bad but little appetite, and wbat I did eat 

W&nrt" tUstressed n>8, or did ma 

DUrn would liavc a faint or tired, 
all-gone feeling, as though I liad not eaten 
anything. Wy trouble was aggravated by 
my business, painting. Last ««■.» 
spring I took Hood's Sar- ®OUr 
sap.-u-ill:i, which did me an StOITiach 
immense amount of good. It g.no nio an 
appetite, and my food relished and satisfied 
the cra'ving I Iiad previously experienced." 
George A. Face, Watertown, Mass. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Sold hy all dni>i;Bl,sts. ?1; six for ?5 I'rcimrcd oniy 
bjrC. I. noon 4 CO., Apotheoari«^Lowell, Mas*. 

100 Doses One Dollar 



HAPpy je m. 

The Season of Grand 

Resolves and Sol- 

ennn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All 
You Try, 

Better Try 



"Get There" 
so You ha i 



if 



REAL ESTATE. 



THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



In the death of Col. Dudley, the vice- 
president and general manager of the 
St. Paul <fc Duluth road, the road sus- 
tains a loss which will be deeply felt and 
the railway service of the country loees 
one of its best trained and ablest mem- 
bers. The devotion and worth of the 
service of such a man are only adequately 
measured when they can be no longer 
commanded. To his frienis in all parts 
of the country and especially on the line 
of the road where his familiar presence 
will be sadly missed, the news will be a 
painful shock, for although so dan- 
gerously ill, there was a clinging hope of 
his recovery. 



"I (five you a dead, stralffht pointer," said a 
friend of mine yesterday with more emphasis 
than olegiince, "that the lat)or vote Is going to 
surprise everybody. The lalx)r party is now 
orjranizeti, I.tiiO strong. Tliey intend putting a 
ticket in the field. As-to who will l>e their 
candidates no one knows. They will select 
good men, however, and trust to getting 
enough votes from independents and mug- 
wumps to elect some of their candidates. They 
make the claim that they have 1500 men en- 
rolled, members of the various organizations, 
who will vote the ticket. 

* * « 

Any man possessing the legal (lualiflcations 
may run for any office. All he needs is the 
endorsement of 1 per cent of the last vote 
This is part of the new election law under the 
Australian system. Every candidate for a 
city office, before entering upon the contest, 
must pay a fee of *.5 to the city clerk. 
For a county office a .fin bill has to 
be paid to the c-ount auditor and an aspirant 
for state offic-e mu.st hand over JoU to the state 
auditor liefore he Is privileged to run. Tliese 
amounts are to pay necessary expenses, tick- 
ets, etc., which the city, county or state fur- 
nishes. It is a mistake to suppose, as at least 
one Duluth paper dues, that there is the same 
regulation of the caucuses in the new law as 
in that of two years ago. In the new law 
there are but four sections relating to the 
primaric*8 and one of those is typ<Jgraphlcally 
Incorrect. 

* * • 

G. H. Holden was favorably mentioned as 
candidate for alderman from the Third ward. 
He would be a strong man if he would run, 
but he told me he didn't want it and wouldn't 
have It. The colonel has enough on his 
hands. , 

* Hf if 

Moves are now being made on the political 
chess board, that will determine, before the 
next two days have passed, just who will b 
the republican candidate for mavor. 

* * * 

James Seville is being pushed by a number 
of his democratic friends to come out as can- 



BITS OF STATE NEWS. 



Ciottlieb Horn and August Schultz, 
both of Eyota, have been arrested for 
stealing corn from a car. « 

The puljlic sch(X)lsare closed at Fulda 
on account of inHuenza. 

Napoleon Marlette, a farmer residing 
ten miles west of lied Lake Falls was 
killed by a vicious bull yesterday. Mar- 
lette lived but a short time after tHe at 
tack of the animal which ran its horns 
through his abdomen. 

F. J. Vogelsberg, an ex-alderman and 
an old resident of Faribault died after 
an illness of only four days. 

It is said that the Minneapolis police 
commission will be abolished at the next 
meeting of the legislature. 

There is a curiosity on the Lockhart 
farm at Red Lake Falls. It is a cat that 
had its hind legs cut off above the sec- 
ond joint. The wounds soon healed and 
now she goes through all the antics of a 
kitten on her front legs, with the rear 
end of her body elevated skyward. She 
has even been said to turn around on 
one front foot while playing with her 
tail with the other. She is not for sale. 



What Was HU Naiue-.> 

Sing mo no sonjr of love and home, 
t»f woudrus beauty bright: 

Tell me no tale of Iio|k' and joy, 
For I am sad tonight. 

Nay : ral her choose a sobbing strain. 

And cruoii it low to rue; 
Sing me that song of songs, of him 

Who divetl into the sea. 



Smoke the Bndion cxgm, the tineet in 
the market W. .A . Footk & Co. 



To Keal Kstate Men. 

Pleal estate owners and all others 
operating in Superior real estate sub- 
scribe to "Robert G. McDowell's Atlas 
of the City of Superior." 

Robert MoFbrran, 
Subscription Agent, 
3'27 West Superior street, Duluth. 



The proceedings of the public meeting 
yesterday at the rooms of the Chamber 
of Commerce, to consider the question of 
the new high school building, were re- 
ported in The Herald last evening. The 
objections to tinkering with the present 
old Washington school building with the 
view of adapting it by additions for the 
purpose of a high school were clearly and 
forcibly brought out by the architect 
who is designing the propcifed new 
building. Duluth is not willing to be 
behind any city of its size in the country 
in the intelligent liberality of its expen- 
ditures for public Bchwilg, and the case 
in question is one which obviously de- 
mands a thorough and adequate provi- 
sion and not a patchwork makeshift. 
Let us have a building worthy of Duluth 
and fully up to the demands of the 
present enl'ghtened day in point of 
accommotlation, fitness and sanitary- 
arrangements, t 



didate for alderman in the Second ward. 
all probability he will run. 



In 



"Truthful JaaieTt." 

[Duluth News, Jan. 15.], [Duluth News, Jan. IH.] 
Hough on Hall- \\ There isn't a word in 
Meeting ' ailed In HlsiyesterdaysNews atiout 
Interest Goes Agralnst the meeting's belnfr 
Him.— If M. (>. HallciiUed in the Interest of 
ever had a doubt as to;M. O. Hall 
his inability to win the 
coveted vnisitlun of 
mavor of this city, that 
doubt must have ripen- 
ed into a certainty on 
Monday night. 



Who Is to Blume? 

To the Editor of the Herald: 

The statement in The Herald last 
night concerning the worthlessness of 
the city water works to protect the city 
in case of serious tire has abundant 
proof of its truth. The history of the 
city water works in the past two years 
has been breaking of mains, Hooded 
streets and basements. The city can 
pay these damages as long as 
the / money holds out. But who is 
to blame? Let this matter be 
investigated by the council, and a de- 
mand made that a better service be given. 
Why cannot water be put into the county 
court house? Why cannot street mains 
be put in as they are in other cities 
without continually breaking and wash- 
ing out streets? The Water company 
says: "The people understand 
nothing about hydraulics any- 
how, if they want water they 
can get it." Judge Stearns under- 
stood enough about hydraulics to order 
water hauled to the court house because 
they were freezing during court. The 
insurance agents understand enough 
about hydraulics to stick on a pretty 
stiff insurance rate. 

A Dui^LTH Engineer. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bintlery and job rooms. 



6 PER CENT! 



SPECIAL LIST 



-or- 



BARGAINS 



OFFEKEl) BV 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 150 

1 Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best b»rgain offered now is stock in the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate ot profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Dnimpfoved Propertj. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY, 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONOS BOUGHT. 



c. 



E. RICHARDSON, 

375 West Superior Street. 



COFFIN k WARIIEI! 

30 FARGUSSON BLiKIK. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 6. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15 

All below the market. 



THE NEW Y-AR'S LEAF. 



IChlciipo Herald. J 
Just now is tlic (ime when the averajre man 
HeKins to prospectively uientullv plan, 
.\>< the annual sweurintt offst^iison draws near 
Of the leaf he'll turn over the first of the year. 
Lveiythlujf that Is wrong from his life he'll 

eilaee. 
And n.iuKht that's unjust in his tiioughtshave 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
When he says so and so then the business Is 

done. 
Rut in onler to liave his new plan broken In, 
He d better not tarry a day to bejrin. 
And 'tis Ijcst ht should not use the leaves too 

fast. 

Wlij not employ this year the leaf turned for 

last? 



CUGUF i PRINDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Bulldinf;. 



The Weather Bulletin. 

Meteorologrical report received at 
Minn., 8 a. m. Jan 15, 18fO. 



Duluth 



PLACES. iBar iTher 



Duluth .:jo.64'— i.H 

Pt. Arthur.. :».:>4— a; 
Wlnnliicjr . . liJii.TOi— J8 
St. Vincent ao «.'!— 2S 



Q'Appelle 
Aseinib'ne . 

Helena 

Huron.Dak. 
St. Paul.... 
La Crosse... 
Rlsmarck... 
Moorhead . 



30.72 

."JO.TO 
iO.tIS 
:*).«« 
W.6B 



— '^8 

— k 
-26 
-18 

— 8 
-30 

!— 24 



Wind 



8W 

Calm 
Calm 

w 

w 



Kaln. Weather 



THE SPALDING, 



e. p. EMERSON. Proprietor. 



COFFIN &. WARNER 



Stnctlj Fifst-Class in all ippDintments. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



C. SHERWOOD k CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE GENCINE BARGAINS IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlHt; parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask is for |.. rties to examine our list and 

compare them rlth other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," - HUNTER BLOCK. 



Cloudless 
Cloudless 
,Cloudles,s 
C iiudless 
Cloudless 



STATE EDITORS' 



IDEAS. 
The 



in 



Advance sheets of the trade and navi- 
gation returns of Canada for 1889 fur- 
nish fresh evidence, for those who are 
Btudyinff the trade relations between 
Canada and the United States, of the 
great extent to which the Dominion is 
dependent upon the United States for a 
market for the sale of her natural pro- 
ducts. That the United States is Can- 
ada's natural market cannot be disputed 
in face of the facts now furnished, nov 
withstanding the customs barrier which 
Canadian products meet at the bound- 
ary line. The aggregate trade between 
Canada and the United States amounted 
to $94,0(J<?,000, or forty-six per cent of the 
total trade of the Dominion. Exports 
to Great Britain amounted to 838,100, 
000 and to4h^'niteu States to $4.3,400, 
000. Imports from (ireat Britain 
amounted to ^2,300,000, and from the 
United States to $50,500,000, As 
compared with 1878, trade with 
the United States has increased 
over 8-2O,00O.oa), while with Great 
Britain it remains alx)ut the same. 
Aa compared with 1888, ex- 



Dodge County lieeord: The countr)' 
is flooded with advertisements of so- 
called national building and loan com- 
panies that make the most extravagant 
promises of profits. All propositions of 
this kind should be looked upon with 
suspicion. The legitimate building and 
loan associations offer go«xl profits and 
gilt edge security. This is well known, 
and t<x) often anything tjearingthe name 
is accepted without a question. Shares 
that are represented as certain to earn 
from '20 to 50 per cent on the money 
vested are things to keep away from 

Morrison County Demwrat: The cen- 
sus of Morrison county for 1890 will be 
materially increased by the advent of 
over .500 now settlers on lands adjacent 
to the line of the cut-off. 

Winona Republican: The Winona & 
Southwestern has prepared a statement 
to the various towns along the projected 
line west of Utica to the Iowa Ixjrder, 
asking a renewal of the aid heretofore 
voted, but whii.-h has lapsed bv reason 
of the unex|H)cted delay in buiUling the 
road. Two routes are under corwideta 
tion, and other advantages are so nearly 
balanced that the final selection will be 
determined by the amount of aid. 

M.jorhead News: The attendance at 
the noriual sch(X)l is so large thiit some 
students Hnd it difficult to secure board- 
ing accommodation. 



N P't Cloudy 

8 Cloudless 

Calm Cloudless 

Calm .06 Cloudless 

Calm Cloudless 

SW Clou dless 

I ^u'" '^'" '^"'umn In.licates trace One (1) 
Inch of rain or melted «uow equals ten ( 10) In- 
ches of snowfall. .Minus (—) in temperature 
column indicates below zero. 

W. H. Fallo.v, 

Seriroant Sltrnal Corps 

DoLUTH, Jan. Id.— Local forecitut for 
twenty-four hourti, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
17: Fair weather and nearly station- 
ary temperature. 

Washington, Jan. IG.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending H a. m. to- 
morrow: For North Dakota: Fair, 
wornwr, southeasterly wiu<Li. For 
South Dakota: Fair followed by local 
■snows; southeasterly winds, warmer. 

Life ill Prixen Crf>««k. 

Texas Siftings: Missionary (just ar- 
rived, to mayor of Prizen creek): ''I am 
very sorry to find that there is no suit- 
able place for a young man to spend his 

evenings. I mean to try and " Mayor 

Rattler (becoming excited): Smitten 
vv ashington ! No place for a young man 
to spend his evenings, hey? An't you 
heard of my square faro bank on Cho 
teau avenue? There's a place for a 
young man to stay all night if he's got 
the dust and the sand! Roaring Jehosh- 
phat, what's your idea of a suitable 
resort for a young man'/" 



Humphreys' 

Dr. lU iU"HitKi»'spKnKiis areM-leiitllloallvaud 
careruUy preimrt-.l iirescripilous ; usi-d formally 
years lu private iirati Ice with suceesK.:in<1 forovor 
thirty y.ars us.-d by the people. Kvery slnttlo Spe- 
clncjs a six-cla 1 cure tor the Ulsea.-it named 

Thi-se speclflcs cure wltJ-aut druKKlntf, ounr- 
Insor riHluclng the system, and are In fact aii.i 
deed the soTerelKnremedieaoftheWorld. 



UST OF FRINcn-Al. N08. CTRES. PEl 

1 Fevern, fonKestlon, Inflammation... 
a ^^ orin<«, worm Kever, Wonn folic 
at'rjinB Collc.or'leetldnKof Infauts 
4 Dinrrbea, of children or Adulu . 

9. JV^fntcry. GrlpliiK. lUUouaCoUc 

O t'nolera M orbuH, VomlttDK 

7 C'oUBhs, Colli, Bronchitis 

8 N earn lei H. Toothache. Kaceache . , 

9 Headiii he*. SIckHeadaclie, Vertijto , 

10 Dyxpep.tiii, Ulllous stomach 

1 • Hiippressedor Pninfnl Perioda. , 

!•£ \\ tiileM, too Profuse t'erlod» , 

l.'l Croup. CouRh, DiflhultlireathinK .. , 

11 >nlt Ilhruni, F.ry.-li)elas. Knipttous. , 

1 •> ICheumnllMin. Khi'iinintlc Paln.a 

!L' l;'«',veraml Atfue, (hills, Jlalarh^... . , 

17 PiIpm, "■'"•I or Bleeding 

Xy. ('"""■'■''• tiifliienza. Cold In the Head , 
.7 i """I'ing CooKh, ".^lolent Cotiitlis. , 
.i '/'""'■'■''' "'"hil'lv, -nyslcalWeaknesB , 

•J7 Kidney IliMPHHe . 

'^*J Nervous Oebillty 1. 

JO J riniiry Wenknrsii, Wettlnir Bed. . 

a'.i l'iseuNe!<oribeIIeart,PalpltaUoal. 



B.C.GKIDLSY. J. C. MISHLKK 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Koom2«), Kxchar'.ge liu iding-. 
List your property with usat i»hat Itis worth 
and we will sell It. We invite everybo<lv to 
call in and see us, and solicit e)rn!snc)nde"iice 



Sold by Drtigglsts. or sent pootpald on receipt 
•f price. 1>R. PIiMi-HREVs' SlANt:^!.. (144 paiw*) 
rtohly tionnd In cloth and g-oM, m.il'cd free. 
Humphreyg'.Medic ineC'o.lii'-- Fulton St. N Y. 

Specifics. 



Grand Skating Tournament. 
A grand skating tournament will take 
place Saturday evening, Jan. 18, at the 
VVest End Parlor Skating rink. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Superior street, 
between twelve young ladies. A fine 
gold medal will be awarded to the win- 
ner. Four competent judges will be on 
hand to award the prize. Walkers Mili- 
tary band will be on baud. Everybody 
should try and attend as it will be the 
finest match ever seen in Duluth. Ad- 
mission, gents, 2.5c; ladies, 15c; children, 
10c. The match will take place at 9 
o'clock sharp. Medal can bo seen at 
rink. T. M. Ekicsob, Prop. 

Capt. S. G. Johoflon, Manager. 



Does Kxpenence Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
esi>ecially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown by the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 
^ The head of the firm of 0. I. Hood A 
Co. IS a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all theknowleflge which mtxlern research 
in medical science has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 



Mortgage Sale. 

DEFAT'LT HAVING HEEN MADE IN THE 
payineiu of the sum of three hundred 
flftwn .VHiiO dollars (Wl.-.r*)), principal and 
Interest, which Is claimed to Ik; due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain niort^jraire, duly 
executed and delivered by Francis X. Parent 
aud Mary E. Parent, his vife, to Henry P. 
Davis, bearing date the seventh day of J line 
A. D. iKSit, and duly rcconled in the officre of 
the rt^Kisterof deetls in aud tor the county of 
St. Ixtuis, and state of Minnesota, ou the 
oijrhth day ..f June A. D. ISsti, at H o'clock aud 
lU nuuotes, A. M., in H.Kjk 41 of Mortg-.tti's, on 
ptiffo 67, and no action or proeeo.jin(f at law 
orotlierwisehavinfrbeen institutitl to retx)ver 
the debt secured by said Mortjfajre, or any part 
theix-of: 

Xow ther<>fore. notice is hereby given, that 
I'y virtue of a jjower of sale conUined in .said 
niortg^asre, and pursuant to the statute In such 
ease made and provided, the said .MortiTOKi' 
will be foreeloM'd. and the premi.«es describetl 
in and coven-d by said mortgUKc, viz: 

Lots thre«' iSlaud four (4i, of se<tion ei^liteen 
im and lot (.3), of section nineteen (l»), all 
in township si.xty-thre« (fiS), north of range 
twelve (I'-'i, west of the 4th principal meridian 
in .St. Louis county, and state of Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and appur- 
tenauws, will l>e sold at public auction 
to the hiKhest bidder for ca~h, to pay said 
debt and iiiten>8t, and the taxes, if any 
on said pn inises, and twcnty-llvo dollars 
altorueys fee, as stipulated in and by 
said mortgage In ease of foreclosure and the 
(lisburscmenta allowed t>y law; which sale will 
!«• made l)v the sheriff I'f said 8t Ix)uls 
county, at the froiU door of the Court House 
In the city of Duluth in said county and state' 
on the anh d;k»- of January. A. D. ISim. ut 10 
o'cltK-k a. in. of that day, subject to redemiv 
tion at liny time within one year from the day 
of sale, as provided by law. 
Dat^d December 13th, A. D. im>. 

HE.NHV P Davis, 

D »i ., Mortgrag«o. 

B. N. Makhlk, 

Attorney. 

Dec. 14-21-38. Jaa, 4-11-18^. 



IWIONEY TO LOAN IN 

sums on Duluth 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 an 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 
Room 3, - . Mil'^r Block 



ALL 

Real 

8 per 




GREAT ENGLISH REHEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 

■■ ~^- A gruarantC' cure for all ner 
vous disease such as Weak 
Meraorv, Loss Brain Power, 

Hysteria, Headache, Fain in the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhiea, Universal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
lency and general loss of power 
of the Generative Organs;— in 
either ee.x, caused by IndlRcre- 
ll«f|l*T>Uac> tlon or overexertion, and which 
ultimately lead to Premature TradenarS. 
Old Age, Insanity and Consump- 
tion. ll.OO or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mail on re- 
ceipt of .price. Full particalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We tioarautoe Six 
BoxeH to cure any ca«e. For 
every $5.00 order retxilved, we 
send six boxes, with a written 
guarantee to refund the moueymi^ j_L|T^ 
If our Specific does not effect a cure. Address 
sUoommunlcatlous to the sole manufaeturern 
THE MDHRAY MSDICINBCO 
, „ Kansas City, Mo. 





Best St>t 
of Teeth. 



$8.C0 

guClum; 

Painless Dentist. 

Boom 1-7. 406 Weet Superior Street. 
Farguoson Block. . TMiuth 



NOTICETO ST[AM FITTERS 



Sealed proposals will bo received until 3 
o'clock p. m, January .SJth, isiw, by E. R. Jelfer- 
son. chairman of committee on court house 
and county Jail, for the stcain-heating ajipara- 
tus in the new i-oiinly jail, in accordance with 
plans and spt>citIcatioiis drawn by (>. G. Tra- 
phagen, architect, on file at the ofllce of the 
county auditor. 

Each pro|)osal must be accompanied with a 
certihed check for two liundrt>d dollars, to lie 
forfelte<I to St. l<ouis County in the event that 
the proposal which said check lu-eom aiiies 
shall be accepte<l by the county commissioners, 
anil that the person making the proposal shall 
fail to comply with its terms. 

Address all proiHisals to E. K. Jefferson, In 
careof county auditor, Dulutli, Minn. 

For further Information apply to John F. 
Schlenues, superintendent, Duluth, Minn. 

The t^mmisslonors reserve the right to reject 
any aud all proposals. 

Deo 14-18^<iS4-28Jan l-4-8-U-16-lfr2i2. 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year I 889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
jjarks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved"-althouigh it* is ^x 
ce^lent now---and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The way to make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be c'elight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing oneS"-we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 

Your real(ty) friends, 

C. [, LOM & CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. J 




AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



DK, GKO. 1». HAYCOCK, 



Miuiager 



Two Nights of Meifiinent 

MONDAY AMD TUESDAY, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

First appearance here of 

W. W. TILLOTSON'S 

Merry Comedy Comp'y 

la the New York sueci'ss of two seasons, 

.ZIGZAG. 



PresDiited with the original cast, headed by 
he charming soubrettc, ANNA BOYD. 



UUOM 10, 



HUGO &. CO., 

IiTS";;rs,,^-<j-CE. 

MkTK()P(>I.1TAN Bixx3K. 
TELEPHONE 242. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER,~I06 Second St. East. 



FOfi SALE, ETC 



Sale of seats Thursday, Jan. 23. 
in pi Ices. 



No advance 



PEiOPLES THEATER. 



CULUTH, 



JOHN 8. BAPCNES. Mer. 



'?his week, commencing JAN. 1 3, 
The Great Attraction, 

PRISON LIFE 

—AND — 

The Best Variety Show in the Northwest 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 

Ad vertiM>ments under this head received at 
thelollowing places, besides the liusiuess of- 
llce of file lieraid: 

Kudiou I'hanuacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 
Itoyce Jt Tutiiian, c.>rner Fourth avenue 
and Superior street west. 

J. W. Nclhun. No. l,xol, comer Eighteenth 
aveiue we..<t anu Superior street. 

l>. .luhuisou, ciiicf clerk Phillips hotel. W«6t 
Uuluth. 



Help Wanted. 

WANTED— A cook for a small family, 
quire, aau East SM.H;.)n<l street. 



In 



WAN rKI>-Two kitchen irirls at Hotel St. 
t<ouis. • - 



w 



ANTEU-A Urst-class German nurse ,?-lrl. 
Address Koom ■Jir.i, First National bank. 



WANTED-A stenoKrapher and typewriter 
for leu days. 

iWli^H to employ a few ladies on wilarv to 
lake charg-c of my business at their homes. 
Light, very lasciualiuj? aud healthlul Wages 
»lu iK-r wees. ICelci-f'ncc jfiven. Good pay for 
pan time. Address witli stamp. Mrs. Marion 
Walker, Lt)uisvilJe, K.y. 

ANTbU 
. . liiully 
Ninth avenue east. 



AIT' ANTbU— A g-irl for general house work; 
>V liiullyol ihi-ue. CaU iu fureuooo. 411 



ADMISSION: 



TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



THREE 



x^/ */ ^ •■'^ALAKV, «o eii-eusos in advance, 
t^KJxJ allowed each mouili. .>?teady em- 
I'lu.N iiieiil ut home or ti'a\'eliUK'. No soUcitlug-. 
L>uii«s ileUvcriug aud making colicclioUb. No 
IRHttal cards. Address with stamp, Hafer ii 
Co., Piqua, Ohio. 



WAM'ED-Pastry i»ok, 
Juquire Phillijis hotei, 



also other help. 



AirANrEI>— At the Womaus Employment 
TT llureau, :;il superior pli-ecl east, two 
second girls and a doicen girla lor general 
house work. Kmploynioal obtained tree of 
cost. Mrs. A. i). Ayers. 



Kor ^Sale, 



T710K SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
X? at A. »V. Eiler's SM I..ake menue south. 



I J^OK ff-ALK— My residence with ht) or 1(K) feet 
Xj at aiij tast seconu street. Terms to suit 
purchaser, tl. A. Gilbcri, '.I iJoard ot Trade. 



ACREAGE 



Bargains 



HEAVY HOKsES n)U .SALE— 15 head of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake I'ant, ou 
tlic Northern I'acuic ro.id, lor sale by C. VV. 
Harvey. C/au Oe seen at ilowara baru, on the 
lake shore, Minnesota |ioint. Kesideuce, SS 
West Fourth slrci-l. 



If taken at once. 



LosU 

Part of a goid-Iiuk cuff button in 
thive rings. Lo^t iu Su|)erlor 
or Duluth Finder win receive reward by 
leaving tne same al my office. Hoberl G . Mc- 
DoweU, ic;; \V est eupt rior street. 



LJST- 
sliape of 



LG^T— The record and account liook of the 
Friends in Couucil society. Coutaius 
loout lUU pagvs aud is eight or nine iuches 
square. A liberal reward will be paid tor its 
return to Alworth's abslracl otlicx-. Sir, West 
bU|>erior ^lreel. 



2?\Oil KENT 
. steam, etc.; private famU>' 



Hei-aia office. 



tor IteuU 

D^bU-able room; liath, gas. 
Address S., 



LT^OK liENT— A ten-room bouse comer Third 
JU siiL<el and fifth avenue east. Furnished 
or uuf uruisUeU, wuj boani with leuant or not 
as they may desire. C. S. Allen, room 'AJU, 
bleusou block. 



WANTED— A furnished house for the win 
ter. L. .1. Tausjig, No. !» Pnoenix block 



Land situated near 



Financial. 

I^ULUTH MOUTGAGi- LOAN tXtMPANV 

JL' loans mouey iu any amount ou furm- 
lurc, pianos, lioises and wagons without re- 
moval tix>m owuei's possession ; also ou ware- 
house leceipls, bank stocKs, and any pro|>erty 
ot value; UoU-6 disco. .nle»; partial payments 
received aiiu y our own lime gi-auted tor pay- 
r>eut; uo delay ; mouey ou hand auo furuistied 
immediately after sc-curily is appiviveu. Wm. 
Horkan, >iauager, Hoom iZ, i'argussou block, 
DuluUi, Minn. 





iF VOL WISH 'TO SELL OU UCV DULUTH 
or feuperiorbauk stock, corporation or iu- 
vestincui securities, call on or address U. Mur- 
phiu, broker, M itannmg block, Duluth, Minn. 

_ MISCELLANEOUS. 

^yr H. WlLStJX, Al'TOKNEV ANDCOUN- 
jA • sellor at Law. Will practice iu State 
auti I. ni ted Slates Courts. All buaiuess given 
prompt attention, 44 Fargusson block, Duiuth, 
MiuQ. 



— THE- 



Greatest Snaps 



|JLASTEU1NG. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Office, room D, Hun- 
ter block. 



M 



RS. J. 8. DINW JODIE. 



Teacher of Piano F'orte. \'oicc and Sight Sing- 
ing. Chorus and Choir tXmductor. 

Music i-ooins at J. J. Wlirgias's, lb East Su 
perior sti-eet. and at residence. Ul Teuth ave. B 



M«H 



PAKKEK KOBINSON, 



In the market. 



VOCAL iNslHUCnON, 
» MILES BLOCK. 



^CMILLKN & 

^ and superin 

-, Exchange building. 



McMILLKN & 8TEBBINS, AKCHITECT8 
and superintendents. Office, room No, 



I 



r 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms 510, 511 and Si;, Dylolb Union National Bank Building. 



R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
^ Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

I Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing alj) 
I kinds of furs a specialty, at^- Good workm . if 
^^ ship guaranteed. / 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 

209 East Superior Street. - . Duluth. Minn. 



.^ 



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i 




^ 







PALMEK A HALL. AKCHITBCTS AND 
Sui>erintendeuts.room 4<). Exchange build- 
ing-. Ouliiih, .Muiii. K. .S. ruliner. L. P. Hall. 




ADDRESS 



r. H. 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



CHRiST JAN SC IENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY ANO READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge . 



I *^* 



Gkeat trench remedy. Dii. LkDccs peb- 
lODiCAL PILLS, from Paris, France, act only on 
the Bt-neratiFe organs lu females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (fn)mwhjit. 
ever cause), and all iMjrlodlcal troubles p«H;u- 
Ihir to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted Ui excite menstruation or inonev re- 
tunded. Should not be use<l during pregnancy. 
The large proportion of the ills to which ladles 
are subject is the direct result of a disordered 
and irregular menstruation. Kobt. Stevenson 
&Co., ihiaigo. III., H. lloswarth St. Co., -Mil- 
waukee, Wholesale Agt«. The gienuiue only 
euppUed by Boyce & l\>tman. Sole A«rt8., Du- 




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II V 




DUIjUTH EVENTNG HimAliU JANTTABY 16 1890. 



THE m m SCHOOL 



Somewhat of Size and Cost of 

the Projected New 

Building. 



Some More Expressions of Du- 
luth Opinion on Thi^ 
Subject. 



Leaven of the Eight-Hour 

League Working Among 

Trades. 



The sentiment of citizens generally in 
regard to the meeting yestenlay after- 
noon, details of which were given in The 
Herald last night, in favor of razing the 
Washington school building and erect- 
ing a new #ructure which shall be sufli- 
cient for some years to come. In this 
citizens generaliy concur with the views 
exprepsetl at the meeting. 

Subjoined will be found expreesioa of 
few. ['resident Bradley of the school 
board referred to the fact that the at- 
tendance at the high school had increas- 
ed lit) per cent in the last two years, 
and dwelt upon tlie importance of hav 
ing a building sutliciently large to 
accommodate the increase for some 
years to come. The committee to ex- 
amine buildings at St. I'aul, Minneapo- 
lis, Winona and Stillwater noted that 
where the buildings erecte<l some time 
ago to accommodate present needs have 
been built on to from time to time the 
results were far from satisfactory. He 
favoreil putting upa building that would 
ac-commodate from StX) to UiOO pupils. 

H. W. Pearson submitted that to build 
annexes would have the etTect of cutting 
otf the light, which would render the old 
building valueless. He also favored the 
removal of the building as the Iwst way. 
To remoilel the old building would en- 
tail an expense of dll,iMS. The salvage 
in case the structure was taken down 
would amount to about ^1>0(X>. The 
plans contemplate a building 260 feet 
long with a depth of ITu feet and would 
coBt not less than ^kH.t,aH,). 
It was estimated that about ^150,000 
woul be Dearer the tigure. 

D. (i. C'asii suggCfited that a fejisible 
plan would be to l>uild wings on either 
side of the old building and leave it 
intact until the wings were reatly for <x- 
cupancy. But it was denion.strated that 
this plan would not l>e feasible on ac- 
count of the lightncj^s of the foundation 
walls of the Washington building. 

B. Silberstein wasciii[)hatii-aly infavor 
of having the old buikling taken down 
and a new one erected, not only suf- 
ticient fur jjresent needs, or for two or 
three years, but for the future. He was 
in favor of expernling j?l."jt).000 for a 
building as large as the grotimls would 
permit. 

Judge Ensign spoke very earnestly, 
the seotiment of his remarks being that 
the old building should be removed 
forthwith, not only because of its inade- 
quacy, but for the reason that it was not 
well ventilated; was built to conform to 
old ideas and old style; it was not worth 
preserving, nor tit to be occupied by 
children. 

It was carried at the meeting that 
the present school be removed entirely 
and that the board proceed to erect a 
suitable building on the present site. 

The plans contemplate besides accom- 
modations for KKX) i>upils, an assembly 
hall in the center of the building w hich 
will seat a like number. The building 
will be provided with manual training 
rooms, A clock tower will also be a con- 
spicuous feature. 



By 



THE EIGH T-HOU R DEMAND. 
Whom 



it Will Fir>t he .tiade; the 
iHKiie in I'oliticM. 

Several letters and printed circulars 
have Ijeen received in Uuluth by promi 
nent labor representatives, differing 
slightly in the wonlmg. perhaps, but all 
tending toward that expected millenium 
of labor— the eight-hour system. The 
leaven which will eventually province the 
change is already at work here as else- 
where, and the o^wning of the demand 
will Ije made soon. It will not come in 
the form at tirst of a general demand, 
but will be made by those trades which 
are fully prepared and organized to sus- 
tain a demand. The other trades will 
follow in their order as they become the 
better able to luake the stand, and in 
each instance they will receive the help 
of those Uxlies in other trades which 
have been successful. 

That is about the plan i>f action which 
will prevail all over the countrj', and in 
Duluth the lirst move will be made by 
an utter refusal to support by votes, for 
any municipal otlice, any canilidate who 
does not pledge himself to set about 
making eight-hours a day's work in the 
department <jf city government over 
which he presides. Tlie labor element 
in Duluth will i«j11 at the next munic- 
ipal election about .jUO votes from the 
"dinner x»ail brigade" alone, and at least 
75 per cent of that numljer will be from 
organized labor. 



Won the Suit Aj^in. 

The famous case of Becker vs. How- 
ard, involving SOW).(XX) in lands, was de 
cided in favor of the defendsint yester 
day in the supreme c<jurt at Madison, 
Wis. Becker sued ex State Senator J. 
D. Howard of Duluth for the value of 
several hundred acres of land acr<«s the 
bay, that are now worth at least a half 
million dollars. The plaintitT claimed 
he gave a deed of trust fi>r the property, 
the defendant holding the deed t*< be a 
legal, warranty transfer. The su])reme 
court ruled with the defendant. 



The >«w M[sg<l»l«n. 

Lillian Lewis was seen by another 
small audience in "The New Magdalen" 
last evening at the Temple. .\s Mercy 
Merrick Miss Lew fe again showed her 
wide range of talent. The ajtupany 
plays tonight is Xower, opening the new 
opera hou.se. The Temple w ill be closed 
until the 27th, when "Zig-Zjig" will ap- 
pear for two nights. There will l>e no 
attraction after then until Feb. 10th. 
Murray & Murphy oj^ning at that date. 

The Lower C ourt. 

Edwin S. Johnson arraigned this 
morning on the chariie of abusive 
language, was found not guilty. 

Wm. Fox OD a similar charge preferred 
by his wife Will Ije tried this moruinc 

Wm. Van Uaalen on the same charge 
was found not guilty. 

Andrew Mabosky, a simple drunk, was 
committed. W'lu. King, also a drunk, 
brought to jail in a back, was fined $3 
and costs. Sentence was .suajjended in 
this case. John O'Neal paid his tine. 

WaN Cii;hteeu Below. 

The minimum degree of cold reached 
this morning was eighteen degrees 
below zero at 7 o'clock this 
n-.orning. There is still 

intense c<jld in the Northwest, but there 
were prosjjecta of a let up, the barome- 
ter going dowTi; which indicates a cor- 
responding rise in the temperature. 



PROBLEM OF GO VERNMENT. 

Hon. Seth Ix>w Continuen Uitt DiiMTOuriie 
ou the iiultjet^t. 

[The Herald publi.-hes Ijelow a eighth 
installment of the address of Hon. Seth 
Low of Brookljn, to the students of 
Johns Hopkins university. In view of 
the interest awakened in Duluth over 
municipal government and the future of 
this city, the matter will be of interest. 
It will be continued from day to day 
till completed.) 

Foresight and civic counige are quali- 
ties which it is easy to say <3ught to 
lH>rtain to gootl city government, but it 
IS not equally easy to say how they are 
to 1)0 had. They depend, so far as the 
otlicials are concerned, altogether ujwn 
the quality of the men. Even more, how- 
ever, they depend uptMi the public spirit 
and public sentiment of the place. It 
seems probable that tl'C form of organi- 
zation which has been suggestetl in this 
paper, that is, a city government in which 
the mayor is the real head rather than 
the ndmiual head tmly, will tend to 
set-lire those ginid qualities more gener- 
ally than they have appeared in connec- 
tion with city governments in the past. 
Uniler such an organization the mayor 
feels the inspiration of the great city Ix"- 
liind hiin. He occupies a iKtsitionVvliere, 
for the moment, he emboilies the aspira- 
tions and hoiH's of the community as 
such. It is natural for one so placeil to 
kK)k forward, as well as to consitler mat- 
ters of current administration. 

The ij*)wers which are entrusted to the 
mayor m such a case invite the service 
of the lH.>st men in the town. It is worth 
while for any citizen to l>o mayor of a 
city, with such iK>wersaudop|H)rtuuitIes. 
The system, therefore, tends in the right 
direction; but after all, the main hope 
lies in the public spirit of the iK'ojde 
themselves. They must have an intelli- 
gent pride and interest in the future of 
their city, so as to demand for it from 
their ollicials not only good current care, 
but alsi.f wise provision for the future. 
This is the foundation uik>ii which all 
hope of Ix'tter city government in the 
I'nited States ultimately must rest. The 
\ Liters of a city must be kept informed as 
to its needs, and must bo appealed to in 
ever} way that gives luqw of cultivating 
in them a large public sjiirit. 

To this end three things are essential. 
First, that they shall believe the city 
government is easily within their con- 
trol. Second, that the voice of the 
people shall be truly declareil as the re- 
sult of elections. Third, that their 
natural pride in their city shall be fos- 
tered by every means which can develop 
in a p<,)pulati(m civic courage and a higli 
ideal for their city. The tirst of these 
comlitious, the feeling on the part of the 
people that the city government is easil\ 
w ithiu their control, can be had along 
the line presented in this pajier, by giv- 
ing to them opportunity of electing a 

luavor with i»<,)Wer to make an entire citv 

• ' . .... 

government on its executive side in sj'iii- 

pathy with himself, and for w liich he in 
turn must be responsible to the jH^ople. 
The second condition, contideuce in the 
result attained at the polls, is to Ix- had 
through the ojteration of gixxl regi.stry 
laws on the one hand, and on the other, 
through the procurement of g<xKl ballot 
reform laws which shall deprive money 
of an undue intluenco in the attainment 
of results. The third condition, the ile- 
velopment of public spirit and civic 
courage in the iMjpnlat ion at large, fol- 
lows naturally, to a large extent, from an 
appeal to the pe<.)ple every two years to 
determine at one time the character of 
the whole city government. 

So long as the people feel that the 
olHcers whom they elect have little power 
to d<j harm, even if they can accomplish 
little go<xl, elections neces.sarily tend to 
Ixjcome purely and simply strifes for 
oflice. Let them feel that vital conse- 
quences to the city are at stake in the 
issue, and the citizens will Ixjcome influ- 
ential in their demand for the choice of 
gtxxl men, precisely in pro|>ortion to the 
seriou.sness of the results which they 
tx'lieve to be involved. No other means 
appear etfectually to restrain party spirit, 
and this must be restrained in its a[)pli- 
cation to local affairs. The goo«I of the 
city must precede the go<xl of the party 
in the mimls of the voters before it will 
do so in the minds of the ollicials. If 
the city is to take the second place in 
the thought of all, goo<l city goyerutueut 
cannot Lj had. Perhaps the c ief bene- 
fit of the form of city organization sug- 
gested in this pajxjr is to l>e found pre- 
cisely in this direction. By putting it 
within the ixjwer of the people to make 
an entirely new city government at one 
time, it strengthens the determination of 
the ixx)plo to demaiul a gootl govern- 
ment. At least it may be said that, 
under such a system, a community will 
obtain as good a government as it 
de-serves and will sujqxjrt. Under Ameri- 
can conditions, no Ixjtter government 
can be supplied. 

LConcluileU.] 

SPORTING NOTES. 



THIIT CHIPPEWA MEETING 



The Representatives of the 

Last Ten Tribes Go to 

Odanah. 



The Boston Brotherhood club is made 
up of heavy batters. 

The League clubs are going to have a 
hard road to travel in Cleveland, Phila- 
delphia and Pittsburg. 

The Kan.sas City club will have a genu- 
ine walk-over in the Western associ- 
ation pennant race next season. Presi- 
dent Speas has still a number of good 
men on his pay roll that he might dis- 
pose of. 

It is said that President Day offered 
"Smiling .Mickey" Welch a three-years' 
contract calling for ^000 a year to sign 
with the New York club. "Mickey" has 
takep the offer under consideration. 

Manager Mutrie claims to have the 
contracts of sereral Brotherhood play- 
ers, but won't give their names. 

Silater, now of Kansas City, phiyed 
short stop and tirst base for the Amherst 
college team last season. 

Seventy-one clubs representing 
seventy cities are now united under the 
national agreement. Their clubs are 
li£ted in the following organizations: 
National league, American association, 
International league. Western associ- 
ation, Atlantic association, Texas 
league, Inter-State league, Tri-State 
league, Western and California league. 

There is no longer any doubt but that 
Boston will get Herman Long, Kansas 
City's great shortstop. Long has signed 
a Boston contract and the Kansas City 
club has forwarded his release to I^si- 
dent Young of the National leagu^^p^h 
instructions to promulgate the same as 
soon as Boston shall place in his hands 
the sum agreed to be paid Kansas City 
for his release which is JGotXJ. 

The California Baseball league tele- 
graphed Secretary Byrne of the board of 
arbitration today, asking for the protec- 
tion of the national agreement. Pro- 
tection was accorded, as requested, and 
the formal paixjrs will Ixj signed and for- 
warded to the secretary's olhce at once. 



fa8a.:'.:( 
Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 

L. J. Taussig, 

Phtenix block. 



Applew! Apples! 

The choicest ajiples to be found in the 
city can be had at Clark & Metz. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finibhings at 
The Herald bindery. 



The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



Mrs. Jim Blaine, Jr., Bobs Up 

the Newspapers Once 

More. 



AsHL.v.M), Wis., Jan. Hi. .\bout 100 
delegates attended the adjourned ses- 
sion of the Indian council yesterday 
afternoon, representing ten bands of 
Chippewa Indians, who claim $100,000 
due them from the United States gov- 
ernment under old treaties. 

They left to convene at Odanha, on 
the Bad river reservation, to avoid pub- 
licity. 'They ha\e conferred with sev- 
eral leading attorneys of this city and 
expect to send B. J. Armstrong to 
Washington to look after their rights. 
The old treaties have been examined 
and it looks as if they ))Md a go<xl case. 
They had a private ses^n here and car- 
ried'it on in their own langiifige. The 
delegates represent reservations of the 
Lii Pointe agency in Michigan, Wisconsin 
and Minnt>8ota, those from Minnesota 
being mostly from near Duluth. They 
will remain in session several days. 



RUMORS OF A DIVORCE. 

The Wife of ,fiiinf<< <i. Ilhtiuf to .Sue for 
Ulvorre. 

New Yokk, .lan. IG.— Before the close 
of the present month if Dame Kiimor is 
correct, papers w ill Ixi tiled in n divorce 
case which is likely to attract m<jre than 
ordinan,- interest. Tlie fair plaintiff will 
l»e Mrs. James (i. Blaine, Jr., formerly 
Miss Elkine of,Pittsburg; and concern- 
ing whoso domestic trials many (Milumns 
have Ix-en written during the past two 
years. Young" Blaine is at pres«.'nt work- 
ing in the railroad machine shojis at 
Portland. Me. 

It has always lH»en eontended that, 
being a iiicml>er of the Roman Catholic 
church, Mrs. IJlaino was j)rohibited from 
availing herself of her legal rights in the 
way of obtaining a dis.suliiticm of her 
matrimonial ImukIs; but it would apjioar 
from the statements made by th<Ks«> in a 
IKisition to know, that she has about de- 
cided to l)rave the displeasure of the 
church authorities rather than to drag 
out her existence with nothing more 
than the name of a husband and father 
who api)arently hasdeserted herforgoo<l 
and all. 

DeLancy Nicoll, the well known law- 
yer, has been retained for Mrs. Blaine, 
and counsel and client have had several 
consultations (jf late. Mrs. Blaine has 
so far recovered her health as to lx> able 
to take frequent carriage drives on Long 
Island, and in wiiicli Mr. Nicoll is often- 
times her companion. 



Waked up KOVct ually. 

X lethargic, dormant condititon of the 
liver is hardly to be ovenx)me with dras 
tic cathartics and nauseous cholagogues. 
A gentler, pleasanter and far more effect- 
ive means exists of arousing the organs 
when somnolent. This is Hostetter's 
Stomach Bitters, vouched for by the 
medical fraternity, tested by the public 
for many years. .\ resumption by the 
biliary organ of its secretive function, 
with the activity attenilant upon health, 
a return to regularity of the bowels, and 
a renewal of digestion, are the no less 
happy and certain results of using the 
Bitters systematically. Its laxative 
effect is never painful and drenching, its 
tendency being rather to perpetuate 
regularity than to produce a copious 
attion. Malaria, nervousness, debilitv, 
kidney troubles and neuralgia it sub- 
dues effectually. 

A Keitl Spook. 

.\ Special to one of our leading daily 
papers from Cochrane, Wis., says: "For 
several years the existence of a ghost 
has been reported here. Last Friday a 
party was organized to investigate. Ar- 
riving at the ghost's walk, we saw an 
object about 10 feet high and (i or 7 
inches in diameter. It slowly advanco<l 
to within a roil of the most daring. 
Some of the party tied, but those who 
remained saw it suddenly disappear." 
No European family of ancient lineage 
and blootl, with any pretentions to note, 
is *'itliout a veritable and well authen- 
ticated ghost. "The Burlington" is 
away ahead of any of its comiietitors in 
this respect, as well as in those of fast 
time, smoothness of track, and «kegan(?e 
of equipment. This is recognized by the 
traveling public generally, and allowed 
by all who patronize the line. For tick- 
ets, time tables, rates, and any informa- 
tion, address agents of "The Burling 
ton" or connecting lines, or write to W. 
J. C. Kenyon, general passenger agent 
Chicago, Burlington ifc Northern railroad, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



CANADIAN P ARLIA MENT OPENS 

The I'UherieA <>ue|^Bii: To AltollMh the 
FreiU'h aLnKUXlte. 

OriAW'A, Ont., Jan, 10. Parliament 
was formally opened today. The ses- 
sion promises to be an exceeding lively 
one. The house will take up the' fish- 
ery question at an early dale and in con- 
nection therewith will consider the 
future policy of the government regard- 
ing .\merican fishing in Canadian waters. 
Many of the members are disposed to 
revert to the treaty of 1818, but it is an 
open secret that Sir Charles Tuffer will 
strongly object to this course: and as a 
result the policy of the government may 
be materially modified. Sir Charles 
TufFer will favor a conciliatory policy 
in view of the unsettled condition of the 
controversy reyartling the Behring 
sea, in which British interests are largely 
involved. .Vnother question which mjiy 
cause some lively sctnes is the resolu 
tion to alxilish French as an official 
language in the Canadian Northwest. 
Ihe Orangemen will also endeavor to 
secure incorporation, but their desires in 
this respect will be antagonized by all 
the Roman Catholic members of Par- 
liament. 



An Karl (an t>e Libeled. 

London, Jan. IG. — The trial of Parke, 
the editor of The North London Press, 
on the charge of criminal libel preferred 
against him by the Earl of Euston, was 
concluded tfxlay. Justice Hawkins, in 
summing up the case, spoke of the great 
and manifest discrepancies in the testi- 
mony of witnesses called by Mr. Parke's 
coun.sel to identifiy the Earl of Euston. 
He s*id that if the storj- told by witness 
Saut. who testified that he and the Earl 
of Euston had committed a criminal 
action in tlie notorious house in Cleve 
land street, was true, he marvelled that 
Saut had not lx?en prost>ciited and that 
the warrant against the Earl of Eust<jn 
had not been api)lied. Mr. Parke was 
found guilty of lilx-ling the earl and was 
sentenced to one year's impri8<inment. 



WEST END. 



GeneritI New.s Notfs of :i liay at the West 
Knd of Duluth. 

The much-talked of ladies' skating 
race, in which live young ladies take 
nart, takes place tonight at Twentieth 
avenue rink. A number of small bets 
have been made as to the outcome of the 
race. 

The memliers of the Norwegian Lu- 
theran church hold their annual meet- 
ing tonight. 

A masquerade carnival is to t>e held at 
Erickson's Parlor rink tomorrow night at 
which three prizes will be awarded. 

Mr. Swan Carlson and Miss Annie 
Johnson will l>e married this evening at 
Normanna hall. Mr. Carlson is a con- 
tractor anil is Well known, having re- 
sided here for a number of years. The 
young lady is also well known. 

Miss Struckmeyer gave her regular 
bi-monthly lesson to the West End 
Social club last night. The club will 
hold a dance next Wednesday evening. 

The pay car of the St. Paul & Duluth 
made the boys happy last night. 



FROM CLEVELAND, TOO. 

The Lake City Will ^i<•ud ( apitaliNU to Bay 
In l>uluth. 

The infiux of capitalists and investors 
to Duluth will begin so<ju. Business in 
New York ia bett^jr than it has been for 
months, and monied men are looking for 
places to put their surplus cash. Re- 
cent news articles of importance in The 
Herald have been extensively quoted in 
Eastern papers and it is bringing about 
good results. 

A party of Cleveland capitalists have 
written that they will come to Duluth 
to seek investments, as they understand 
that this city is to be made the chief 
business terminal of the Northern Pa- 
cific road, and the old plans of Jay Cooke 
carried out. The party will probably 
be here next week to put big money int^j 
Duluth real estate. A gentleman now 
in the city, who has visited Cleveland 
recently, says that monied men there 
are hxiking to Duluth as the best place 
in the Northwest in which to make in- 
vestments. 

.Vnd Cleveland capitalists form but a 
small portion of the investors in other 
cities, who will come to Uuluth for the 
same purpose. 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 




1882. 



o 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



AND 



TAKE NOTICE! 

Wo are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Be>t inthe World. 



Get our prices anil vou will be 
feetly siitl8lle<l. 



IXT- 



19 West Superiof Stteet 



CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH 



PENNYROYAL PILLS 



R£D CROSS DIAMOND BRAND. 

f^mfv atxl alwaj- r--liftt.it. l.^dU>«« 
i.*k DniKei-i fiT IHamond Brand. In 




PUlAitlte 



Mortgage Sale. 



WHEHEA.«5, DKFAfLT HAS BEEN MADE 
in Ihe e'liHlitlonsofuoertain inortB-iiKL', 
executed iind dclivcn^d by Miiry iShiTwiii and 
Klijuh O. Shi.TWiii, ht-r husbuud, uiorlK'!i>n)r.s, 
to Aloiizo J. Whlteniaii, mortKHtfce, diitod llio 
eleventh day of October A. D., ItW^T, 
and duly recorded in the ollii'o of 
the reirlsiter ot (U-ods of the county of 
Saint Tiouis and staU' of Mimu'sota 
on the Iwenty-elKlith day of Novomber A. 1>., 
INKT, at nine o'cl<x;k a. in., in b4K)l4 'S,i of 
mort«rajres, on pa^c 13, sucli default (Ktnsist- 
injr of the noii-payinent of the princli'iil anil 
interest niojioys si-curcd by said niortvri'fe, ou 
which said luortKaife tlierf is cluiuied to t>e due 
at the date of this notice the amount of 
llvf thou.'iund six hundn^d and thlrty-tlve and 
."Wi-ltiO ii.">.tKi').iV>) diillan*, principal and interest, 
and no action or pnxx'edinK has been iiLsti- 
tuted at law or In euuity to recover the Uolit 
secured by said mortjpKfe, or any part thereof; 
and 

Whereas, said 'inort»rairo w-as duly 
assiirned by the said Aloii/.o J Wliitouian, 
tnortKasree, to AuKUSta Ix'ttau, by ii.ssi)fnnient° 
dated the second day of November A. 1)., 1>*7, 
and recordctl in the office of the rejrlster of 
deeds of tlie county of 8t. Louis in the stat« of 
Minnesota, on the twenty -oiKldb day id' Novem- 
ber A. 1>., 1><87, at '.» o'eliKtk a. ui., in boi>k P of 
niortguiircs, on pagre ST'i. 

Now, notice Is hereby griven, • that 
by virtueof a iKjwer of sale contained in sjiid 
mortjraKc, and of the statute in siicli 
c«se made and provided, said inortKUKe 
will Ik- fori'clost^ by sale of the inorlK' «-cd 
preuiis«-s therein described, at nublic auction, 
at the front door of the court house. In t he city 
of Duluth, in the county of St.I»uis and state 
of Minnesota, ou .Monday the twenty-seventh 
day of January A D., IHtld, at t^uo'cliK-k in 
the foren<»n, to satisfy tin' amount 
which shall then be due on said iiiurtKaKc, with 
the interest thereon, and costs and expenses 
of sale, and scvcnty-tlvo dollars attorney's 
fees, as stipulated in said mortKagv in case of 
foreclosure. 

The premises descrilHvl In said morfra»ie. and 
so to be .sold, arc the lots, pieces or uarceis of 
land, situate In the county of St. Louis and 
^tate of Minnesota, and known and described 
as follows. t.)-wit : 

I>ols number thirteen (115) and fourteen il4) In 
block nunil)er nine l»), Portland division of Du- 
luth. according to the reeonlcd plat then^of on 
Hie in the oflice of the roKister of det-ds in and 
for the county of St. X^ouls. 

Dated Decern ljer:hd. ls-». 

AUUCSTA LKTTAtr, 

Assignee of Alon7.o J. Whitotnan, 
Mortgaaree. 
Wat.tku AvtiRS, 
Attorney of Augusta (iCttau, 
Acslgnee. 
Dec. 12. 1». -M, Jan. 2, 9, 16. 23 



DB.E.C. WESTS 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Specific for ilvHtt-ria, i>i2xuie«M,Kit«, Ncuraltria. W/ik«' 
I iil!)C^s, Mental I>*'prrs«ion, 8<>rteninff of tin- Kruln.rt- 
■>nltlii;r 111 iD'^anit.v ati'l U'a'Jin;; to nib<ei'y <U-<-av ami 
iie;iili. PnmAtiirf "Ol'l Ajre, liarrenm-i*.'*. I.ohs uI Power 
inrithe*' sex, Invol'intary i-oa.>t'!«, asui RpvPlnatori h(pa 
anr«eU bv orer-i-'xcriion of Ihe biaiii. Mjlfothii^e '"■ 
..vci-indiiltff ce Kach liox contain** one month'- irca'- 
nient. $1 a l>ox, or ^ix tor $5. pent by mui! pnp ii.l 
Wiib carh onjer for mIx boxfi, will t-eml ptir has«jr 
/iiaC^Dt'-o to rcfiintl mon^v ir the treat iiH>ni laila tu 
oirov Uuarant«e«( iiibut^l aiwl ifuuumc bulU oaly by 

Boyctj & Totinan. Phoenix Drag Store, and 
7 WcHt Superior street, sole a^euts, Duluth, 

MiQD. 




FROM DESPAIR TO JOY. 

I<h« Palnfal Story of a. I<airrly Itmdyf 
Kiicl How She Vinailly Secured Haj*. 
piaea*. 

Mn. Morton D. Harlan, residing at No. U 
West 25th Street, New York City, has passed 
through a most wonderful experience. Mrs. 
Harlan had a hap])y home 
and through her devotion to 
her home duties over-taxed 
her strength. She bad do- 
,pres»e<l feelings, entire lack 
if energy in life, and Anally 
a cough at night and morn- 
ing which grew worse each 
day. Upon looking In the 

f'taiw she saw dark cirolM under her cjes and 
oinid that she was growing thinnnr and iiwing 
all int4.>rest in lifw. This painful state of things 
continued for months unlll finally she liocanio 
so weak she could not attend to her duties and 
was conflned to her lied the greater part of the 
time. One day Mrs. Harlan's very dear friend 
Mrs. Willard calleil and was amazed to se«! hoc 
so wan and laded. Two bright he<'iic spots 
st<x>d uiion each cheek, her lips were blue, 
her face pinched and dmwn. and there was a 
pit«><iu» Inok in her eyes. Mrs. Will.ird know 
this meant consumption and her heart, wms 
touched for her friend. At liof earnest rcijuutt, 
the use of an English Rem- 
edy for consumption wa» 
tried. At the start very 
little elTectcould be seen, so 
great an inroad had the dis- 
ea-v made, but hy degrees 
Mrs. Tlarhiu began to regain 
her lost appetite, then her 
itn'nifth, then tier hope, 
then her health, and she is to- 
day In perfect physical con- 
(litinn, wholly as a resnlt of 
the use of Dr. Acker's Kng 
Ush Komedy for Consump 

Ion. 

The Ics'on of this simple story should l>e plain 
to all. So man or woman can afford to neglect 
thos<! lirst syniiitoms of consumption, which 
letnn so slight but which becomes so terriblo 
unless taken in time. This Great Itemedy has 
laved the llvcsof h'.indrt'ds of well known men 
tnd women who were on the verge «i the gniv o 
fnim consumption but who arc well and imyiff 
;o-day. It U sold universally. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boycp & Totman 



Boii i lie 



FOR SALE: 





50-14--ln Hcreage, - 
49-15--ln taje, 
Superiof Street 
Dock Property, - 



-II 



l|UUU, 



- 1.000.000 



Lots for Scile as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



Mortgages Negotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Lowest rates for all sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowing elsewhere In- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank, 
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Certificate ol Ameniieil 



ARTICLES OP lOBPORllTION 



OF LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, I 
Cou.NTv »K St. Louis, ( 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRE-SENTS. 
That we. O/ora 1*. Stearns, presiilent, 
and Win. (' Sargent, secretary, of Lakeside 
Land coiniiany, a cori>oration organ i/,ed and 
doing busln<>8B under tlie laws of Minnesota, 
being duly and severally sworn, do hereby cer- 
tify and depose that at a regular meeting of 
the shareholders of th<' said Lakeside Land 
company, duly called and hc'ld at the oflici'S of 
said company at Duluth. Minnesota, on the 
fourth day of , January, isitil, at two o'clm-k in 
the afteriKK)U of said day, the articles of lin-or- 
l>onition of said corporation were aniendeil so 
as to increa.se tlie capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from one hundred and twcnty-flve thou- 
sand dollars, to five hundred thousand dol- 
lars and so a.s to Increase the number 
of shares In lilt! capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from twelve hundred and flfty to live 
thousand, by amending Article S of said 
original articles of incorporation, which fixes 
the amount of the capital stock of said cor- 
poration at one hundriMl and twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, so as to roa<l as follows, to-wit: 

AIITICLE ;). 

"Tlie amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
iK)rutlon shall be five hundre<l thousand dol- 
lars, (*.'.iKi,i)iXt.O(i); to be paid In on call of the 
board of directors." 

And by ameuding Article 7 of said original 
articles of inconKiiatiiin, which fixes the num- 
ber of slia«)S in the capital st(K'k of said cor- 
porpation at twelve hundred and flfty, so as 
t(^pad as follows, to-wlt: 

ARTICLE 7. 

'The number of shart's in the capital stock 
of the cori>oratioii shall be five thousand ih.flM)), 
each of the par valu<: of one hundred dollars 
tiunt («)), which shares when fully paid up 
shall be non-ass<wsalile." 

That there were present at said meeting, 
who voted in favor of said amendments a 
majority in number of tlie shareholders of 
said coriioratlon, who hekl a majority In 
aiuuunt of the shares of stock of the same. 

O/OKA P. Stkau.nh, 
Wm. C Sakqent, President. 

Secretary. 



Subscribed and sworn to before mo this 'th 
day of January, 1>«0. W. K. Pehkv, 

Notarv Public, 
St. Louis county, Minnesota. 
Notarial Seal, 
St. Louis Co., Minn, 



OFFICK OF KKCJl-STKIt OF UKEUS. 

STATE OP MINNESOTA. ( 
Count V ok St, Lonis. f ^ 
I hereby certify that the wi'.hin articles were 
file<l in this office for record on the fth day of 
January, A. I>. Isim, at ;{:10 o'clock p. m., and 
was duly recorded in Hook O of Miscellaneous 
page 1. 

A.MOK SHICI'HAKI>, 

Uegisterof Deeds. 



STATE OK MINNESOTA, » 
Uf.I'aht.mknt or Statk. f 
1 hereby c<:rtify that the within Instrumen t 
wiui filed for record In this office on the llth 
dayofjanuarv A. I). IWK), at 1* o'clock a. 
Ill . and was duly recorded iu lK>ok Y of incor- 
porations on page >'7U. 

H. MA-rrsoN, 
Secretary of State. 

Jan. 13, 14, 15, 1«. 17. 1«, 'JO. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class in everyway. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room iu town. Livery In 
eonnectlon. WILl lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I. 



WHITE BEAVER'S 

(OyGH@AM 

HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

7". H. SPE/tCE, LA CffOSSE, ms. 

DAVID M. FORD, 

Houghton, L. 8.. Mich. 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



OEALICIt IN 



Lake Superior Gold, Iron and Copper Ms 

Michigan Gold Company's Stock a Specialty. 

"The richest mines in the world." 

COKKESPON DKMCK SOLICITKD. 



miam oecHEsiRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM 4U PmOREI-SIENSON BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - - MINN. 



NEW HOTEL. 

THE 

METIiOPOLITAN 



St, Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4 th and 'WaithtnRrton Sta. 

On Cable Car Line. Best Table 111 the Nuitu 
west. IiateRS!i.OOaad Upwards. 

W . U. Babneb. Manager. 



HARWOOD'S 

City Transportation Freiglit and Express, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue West. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFICE 

17 Pi rat Avenue West. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



ADJOININGS 




-AT A 



Bargain 



Inquire of 



L.S., 



Three Valuatile and Nice-Ljing Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VERY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



Tliree Good. Boilding Lots on Nintli Street, 



Near Third avenue eastj 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



(D.jl.:r:ei szez^-A-LID- 



CAUTION 



"W. Li. Dougriae' name and the price 

are st;in)i>i.Hl On the Ixjttoin of all SnoeS 
afivcrtiscd by him Ijcfore leaving hk 
fiictorv ; this protects the wearers against high priceS and inferior gOOds 
I "your dealer docs noi: keep the style or kind you want, or oflcrs you shoes vithou 
^V . L. Douglas' name and price stamped on them, and s.iys they are juht a 
good, do not be deceived thereby, but send direct to the Factory for you can ge 

V hat you want by return mail, postage paid. Dealers make more profit on un- 
known shoes that are not warranted by anybody ; therefore do not be induced to 
buy shoes that have no reputation. Buy only those that have W. Li. Dou^rla^ 
name and the price stamped on the bottom, and you are sure to get full value for 
your money. Ti:oiisands of dollars are saved annually in this country by the 

V carers of "^^ . L. Douglas' Shoes- In ordering by mail state whether you 
vant Congress, Button or Lace, London cap toe, plain French toe, or narrow cap 
t>e, and be sure to give size and width you wear. I can fit any ftjot that is not de- 
formed, as niv shoes are mad*; in a great variety of widths, sizes and half sizes. I 
guarantee a fit, prompt delivery and perfect satisfaction or money refunded upon 
r;turn of the shoes in good condition. w. i.. ixxolas, Brockton. Ki 




W. L. DOUGLAS 



$3 SHOE 



ai 



CENTLCMEN. 

Inn flno m^iiileiiit cnir shoe, with I>on|;oIa 
topH mikI Oak l.eallier bottom*. Tliejr are 
made in CoiiKreHM, Itiittnn and I^aee on Ix>d- 
diin C»|> Toe, Narrow Cap Toe, and Plain 
Freni'li Toe LaittK, in Ktzeii from S to 11, In- 
elii<lin«; lialf NizcH nnd iu nil widtl>% Ifynn 
liavc licf-n payinu: from 95 to 96 for mhnrm 
of thlM <iii:ility do not do ku longer. One pair 
will wear :ik Ioiik uh two pairs of oontmon 
■hoes aold l>y d<-aI«-rR that are mot warranted 
by the maniifaetiirer. 

Our 4'laimH for lit in ahoe aver all •titer SS 
■hees advert iHf<l, nre : 

l»t. It I'ontainit l>etter niat«riaL 

It in more atyUahi better flttliic anJ 

iliiraUie. 

It ifivfN better general aatiBfactloii. 

It roKtii mt>r^ money to make. 

It HaveM more money for thnconimmer. 

It iH sold l>y ntore dealers throasbout 

thel . S. 

It's (;reat KucreHfi iX due to merit. 

It I'Hiiiiot l>e duplicated bjr any other 

ma:iiir:><'tur<-r. 

It Ik ilifi bekt in the world, and haa a 

lar(;er demand than any other SS 

shoe advertiaed. 



Sd. 

3d. 
4th. 
fitli. 
6th. 

7th. 
8'h. 

9th. 



t B.OOO will be paid to any pemon who will prove the a1>ove statententa to be 

The Following Lines will he found to be of the Same Qnality of Ezoelleikeek 



$5.00 SHOE 
I4.00 SHOE 
I3.50 SHOE 

I2.50 SHOE 
$2.25 SHOE 
$2.00 SHOE 
».00 SHOE 
M.75 SHOE 



tlic best shoe 
AB made in Con(?Tess, Button and Lace. 



CKM INK IIAND-SKWRD.wliirh takes the place of Co*- 

toniinaac shnis tliat cost from t7 to (9. 

TIIK ORIGINAL AND ONLY HAXD-8EWKD 'WEX.T 

S4 KliOK. Kqiials custuni-iiiade shoes custinK from |6toS8. 

FOUroi.ICKMKN. Railroad Men and I-etter Carriers all 

wcHftlici:!. .'iinootli iii--ide as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. NoTadCi 

.ir Wax Tlirc-ari to Imrt tlic fett. 

IS INFXCKLLED FOB HKAVY WEAK. Bentt Cdf Shot 

lor the i)ri':i-. 

M OKKI NGM ANVS. Is the best In the wurid for rough wear t 

niiu pair iiu^lit to wc.ii a man a year. 

1 S EgL'.4 1. TO snOKS TU AT COST FROM 93 TO mSMtk 

I III? pair u'ill wear longer than any shoe ever sold at the price. 

FOB BOYS is tlie best School Shoe In the world. 



YOIJTH*S SCHOOL, gives the small Bo>-s a chance to 

world. 



in th< 



W. L. DOUGLAS $3 AND S2 SHOES 



FOR 
LADIES. 

loth Ladies' Shoes are made in si/csfiom i to;, including lialf £izes, and B, C, D, E and £E widths. 

STYLES OF LADIES' SHOES. 

"The French Opera," "Ttie Spiiiiiiih Arrh Op«'ra," "The Amerif^n Oommos- 
(■enHe," "The Me<iium Comiiion-Sentte." All made in Button in the Lateat Style*. 
Also, French Opera in Front Lace, on S3 Shoe only. 

Consumers should remember that W. L. DOUGLAS is the largest and only Shoe Manufactiuw 
li the world, supplying slwes direct from factory, thuflgivins all the middle-men't profits to the 
>«aiu. WT L. DOUGIAS. BroafcW, ll«ee. 

FFORSALEBY SUFFEL&CO. 



Postoffice Box A A. 



MEMBERS OF THE 

DULUTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 



Ainerican Exchange Bank 
B3II & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Siicurity Bank 
State Bank of 
National Bank 
Marine Bank 



of Dnluth 

Duluth 

of Commerce 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
I 00,000 

1 ,000,000 
100,000 
1 00,000 
1 00,000 
250,000 



SURPLUS 

S200,000 

1 0,000 

lOO.OOQ 

26,000 






I 



!, 



T 



I 



iwiJ ^ Sr 



1 



: rtf >. . ■■ » •?» «...« 



».^» » » ll 



•■t 




I 







L 



i 



» - ■ 




UVSAJTH. EVENING HEBAIiB: JAXUART 16, 1890 



The Markets Are All Dull 
Grain and Stocks 
Today. 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



The opening was dull but steady. 
There was little done all day. Other 
-American markets were somewhat 
stronger, on the cold weather probably, 
and the gootl exports from New York. 
There wsis little business at any point, 
however. Cables were quiet and easy^ 
The close was quiet and steady. 

Cash No. 1 hard closed at 79, Xo. 1 
northern sold and closed at TGJ^. No. 2 
northern cKv^ed at 73. January closed 
at 79 for 1 hard and 764 ^or 1 northern. 
May sold and closed at HiH- May No. 1 
northern closed at Slfg sellers. 



DISTRICT COURT. 



The Daily Movement. 

Cars on track: Wheat, 38. 
Receipts: Wheat. 526 bu. 



Com, 1. 
Ship- 



ments: Wheat, 1132 uu. Inspection: 
Wheat, No. 1 hard 17 cars. No. I North- 
ern 19; corn. 14; oats. 8; total, oS. Min- 
neapolis reported 227 cars against 184 
yesterday. Receipts there were 131,000 
bu. Cnicago reported &i cars on track. 

Chicago Grain GoMlp. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler A. Lewis: 

Wheat: a gratifying increase in the 
volume of trade is noted today, though 
most (.>f it was for local account. The 
feature wiis the large concentrated buy- 
ing early, and this coupled with the out- 
side news which was generally bullish in 
character, should have given us a wide 
range, but tlio rut into which the market 
has gotten, is deep and narrow, and it 
seems imp^>ssible for prices for to break 
away. 0;ish 2 red winter commended a 
premium over January, and the price of 
cash wheat at m^st other points in, are 
evidence that the demaad for the actual 
article is good. Clearances at the sea 
board were fair, while 100,000 bushels of 
a speciid grade were reported taken for 
export at Minneapolis with inquiries fT 
as much more. S<^)me higher prices 
should be the result. 



Jack Frost Downed— I«oth Courti* Hard at 
• Work Today. 

Judge Steam's court opened this 
morning with the case of James H. Bon- 
dy vs. Michael W. Glenn which was 
given to the jurj", and who shortly after- 
ward returned with a verdict for $645.89 
for the plaiutitf. A SO-days' stay was 
granted. 

In the case of Alexander D. Cummings 
vs. Michael Fink, the jury was waived 
and the action put on the list of court 
cases. This action is to recover ^,300 
with interest claimed as damages by 
plamtiff through defendant's breach of 
contract in a realty transaction. 

John W. Shellenbarger vs. the Duluth 
Termmal Rjiilway Company was called 
and liegister Shepherd appeared as wit- 
ness for the plaintiff with some thirty of 
his lecord books, the object being to 
show plaintiff's title to property which 
had been damaged by the passage of de- 
fendant's tracks through it. 

Before Judge Ensign Cummings vs 
Pink was set for truil Feb. 7. State 
Bank of Duluth vs. L. H. Grieser and 
Wallace Warner; judgment for the 
plaintiff for 61,050 and interest at 10 per 
cent. H. W. Pearson vs. H. A. Tiffany 
et al, set for trial Feb. 4. Robert White- 
sides vs. H. W. Pearson, to be tried 
Feb. 4. 

Tomorrow, before Judge Ensign, 
Douglas A. Pet re vs. R. S. Munger et al. 
will come up and will take nearly all 
dav. 

On Saturday the case of Nellie K. 
Cramer vs. Albert G. Cramer will come 
liefore the court. An order to show 
cause why a receiver should not be ap- 
jiointed in the matter of the inwjlveut 
druggist, J. F. Erickson, will also be 
argued. Two motions for new trials in 
two separate cases, transferred from the 
district court of Crow Wing county, will 
be heard. Both are imjKirtant. 

Juclge Ensign states that (m Monday 
the following cases will be called up and 
dispoee<l of: 

Charles Chauneey vs. S. W. Burliaus, J. A. 
Robert vs. L'L'nieo St. .lean Baptiste, Lottie E. 
Uiekcn V9. City of Duluth, Lena Wise vs. 
Andrew Wise. w. O. Joerns vs. Kdw. MeKeever 
et al., Terreuce Mourniu vs. James S. IMerce, 
Porter s«team Heatintr fompany vs. W. T 
Bailey, Kohert F. Wilson et* al. vs. Huzeu 
Stevens, Hubbanl i Vincent vs. Mnry Vail. 



FflOM WEST DULUTH, 



Work Going on at the Iron Bay 

Shops and the Iron Car 

Works. 



New Investment 
Formed; General 
Notes. 



Company 
News 



CJTY BRIEFS. 



Sto<-k UoK!<ip. 

Caicago, Jan. 16. — Northwestern and 
Union Pacific were heavily sold today on 
Walker's decision declaring the alliance 
a violation of the Interst:-ite Railway as- 
sociation agreement. After breaking 
Union Pacific a point the bears directed 
their efforts towards the grangers, gen- 
erally with the result that prices were 
marked down nearly a point all around. 
Money was easy and in spite of the 
weakness in the grangers the coal stocks 
held remarkably strong, presumably on 
account of the cold wave. Liead was 
marked up a point and the talk is quite 
buUisu on it. The governmect took an- 
other block of bondi making the total 
for the past three days nearly 45,000,000. 
The market is now heavily oversold. 



Ttae MluueapoiU Cloi»e. 

MntxEAPOUis. Jan. 16.— Closing quotations- 
No. 1 hard. January, 79; February, ra'j; 
May, lei,: on track. T9','»?0. No. 1 northern. 
January. TT^*; Feb. TT'j; May. *'.; on 
track, 7.S. No. 3 northern. January. 74; 
February 744: May, 78: on track, 7i&~6. 



Chleaco Close. 

CHic.\ao, Jan. lo — iri.j p. m. 
steady: January, 77: Mav. Sl'i. 
January, 2sS: ; May, 31^,. 



close— Wheat 
Com. steady ; 



New York Stocks. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported by 
W. W. BiU & Ca: 

Today. Yester- 

Chlcaaro. Burllnirton * Qulncy. lOiJ lOH'* 

Ameri<.-!»n <'otton Oil Sl'i aii^j 

Mi-s<>uri Pacitic 7S'-i TiH 

Northern P;»ciflc preferred 73>!i 73^ 

Chieajfo, .Milwaukee Jt St. Paul.. »<i4 68H 

Suirir I'rust 56S 55 

Gas Trust 16 46 

Loui-iviilei .Vashville H«!?i 87i, 

Chieai:o Ji Northwestern 110 IIOL4 

Hock l>land ioh i»6'-j 

Lakr .-^hore , V^}i, iwi^ 

Keii.hi)(r 3B?i 3Bii 

Ten'i. c.ial and Iroa 86V4 84'-i 

Riclimoiid Terminal 2IJ4 21 

Atchison 31' .311, 

l>eiaw:i.e4 I.ackawanna ia>'4 lai-'^ 

New K i^fland 444 444, 

L'-ad Trust ajag 301, 

We<teru nion »» k1% 

rni.)Qpa.iae 66^ 66', 

Wisconsin Central 3314 343^ 

OU loei^ 106 

The Mills. 

North we.'^tern Miller tomorrow will say: 
The output of Hour was again increased 
last week, being 143,710 bbls, against 
135.780 bbls the week before and 88,050 
for the time in 1889. The amount of the 
manufacture will be smaller the present 
week. Four mills are down, cutting off 
uOOO bbls. One of these, representing 
1600 bbls, will be started tomorrow, but 
the pHKluction for the week is not likelv 
to Mtceed 110.000 bbls. This curtailment 
is clirei;tly tra«.-eable to the dullness of 
the flour market. The three Pillsburv 
mills are in full operation. The current 
output considerably exceeds the sales of 
flour, and every Ixxly is storing some. 
The water mills are not doing as well as 
a week ago. Flour is more depressed 
than ever, and millers complain that very 
few orders are coming in. There were 
some sales for a few days. Pillsbur\- to- 
day rejx.rted the sale of .=3000 bbls pa'tent 
for Gia.'^g(nv at 31s 6d. The exfjort trade 
is still verj light, and some of that flour 
going abroad is being c<jnsigned. Prices 
of flour are kept at about the old stan- 
dard. The direct exports for the week 
were 55.110 bbls, against 63,180 the pre- 
ceding week. 



THE SAULT BILL. 



It ComeA Before the Senate Today: 
Dulnth Represented at Washington. 

The appropriation bill for the improve- 
ment of the Sault canal and Hay lake 
comes before the senate today. . 

Early in the week both Senator Davis 
and George H. Ely telegraphed from 
Washington that Senator Frv e proposed 
to take up the bill ttxlay. antl urged that 
a comiuittee lie sent from this city to 
work in its cause. At the la.st Chamber 
of Commerce meeting it thought, under 
advices from Wa.shington, that the bill 
would have no obstacle presented for its 
passage in the senate, but that the dan- 

fer to It would come from the house, 
►uluth is represented at Wash- 
ington Uxlay by Hon. George 
H. Ely of Cleveland, and Luther 
Mendenhall of this city. Both will do 
good work for a measure upon which 
depends so much commerce of the great 
lakes and Duluth's advancement. 
;-The bill appropriates iSJ,7.38,865 for the 
improvement of the canal and $1,684,115 
for Hay L^ke channel. One million 
dollars have already been expended on 
the canal work, the total estimate for 
the work being $4,738,86.5. Last Thurs- 
day Senator Davis made a powerful 
speech in favor of the bill. Although 
the bill establishes a bad precedent, it 
is believed in Washington that it will 
pass, as the appropriation is so necessary 
and of such vital importance to lake 
commerce. 



Mr. S. W. Clark, of Clark & Metz, 
leaves for Montana this evening with a 
car load of eggs for sale in Montana 
towns. 

Foreman Barl>er, of the Spalding ton- 
sorial parlors has taken charge of Jack- 
son's barber shop near Sixth avenue 
west. 

Oapt. of Police McLaughlin shot a 
valuable horse yesterday under instruc- 
tions from the board of health. The 
animal was afliicted with some spinal 
disease. It was the property of John 
Finn and cost him 83lX>. 

The concert by the Zenith City Con- 
cert club tomorrow evening at the 
Bethel promises to be well attended. 
The excellence of the principals is a euf- 
hcient guaraiitee that the concert will 
be a good one. 

Tne reception committee of Clan 
Stewart to arrange for the ISlst anni- 
verssiry of the poet Burns' birthday met 
last night, and arranged a program for 
the celebration of the event on the 25th 
inst. 

Several officers of the St. Paul & Du- 
luth went out for a short run this morn- 
ing to try the effect of Priest's snow 
flanger on a portion of their track across 
the bay. 

The Duluth Music company has ten- 
dered the Apollo club the use of its new 
wareroom for purposes of rehearsal. 
The offer will probably be accepted. 

Attorney Geo. L. Spangler is in re- 
ceipt of a letter from the assistant secre- 
tary of the interior, stating that owing 
to the great mass of business before the 
department, certain important land 
cases — among them those of Linnell and 
others, which are pending, cannot be 
taken up for a few days. It transpires 
that the lacds in dispute are being 
rapidly denuded of the best timber. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
1' below; 3 p. m., 4 above; 6 p. m., 1 
above; 10 p. m., 4 below; 7 a. m., 18 
below; 9 a. m., 16 below; 12 m., 12 
below; Maximum, 4 above. Minimum, 
18' below. Ditily range, 22°. 

.\ contest, based on the adverse report 
of Special Agent Crockett, was heard at 
the land office today. Mike Odenda wa* 
the defendant in the suit. No decisions 
have yet been rendered in the s'vamp 
land cases. The next hearing has been 
set for March. 

Agents of the Hammill Fire Escape 
company of Chicago are in the city to- 
day. They will exhibit their appliance 
on some high building of the city this 
week. 

The Are alarm b<jx at the corner of 
Lake avenue was burned out Isist night 
by an electric wire crossing the tele- 
graph wire. The trouble experienced 
yesterday from crossed wires has been 
rectifled. 



At the Iron Bay Works machinery is 
coming in rapidly from the old plant 
but is getting along much slower than 
satisfles President Merritt. Only a very- 
little of the heavy machinery is yet 
movetl, outside of a f ujat een-foot lathe, 
and the engine and tnNlling crane. It 
doesn't take long to unload a car of ma- 
chinery when it comes and the workmen 
are anxious to start up. The large 
amount of work on hand is also an in- 
centive to get started. The company 
has bought 200 tons of charcoal pig from 
the Ashland furnace and expects it 
along in a few days. It will be softened 
by Ohio or Alabama iron. 

Five cars .started east last night via 
the Zenith City line. They were loaded 
with flour at the Imperial. Five more 
start tonight, making shipments of Hf- 
teen cars to date. About half the force 
at the works has been ill lately with in- 
fluenza, and those who had been left had 
to do extra work, and even with this the 
works have been severely crippled. 

The rolling mill started up today again, 
several changes being completed. 

The Herald yesterday gave some par- 
ticulars of the new work going on at the 
blast furnace, especially in regard to the 
incline plane and the watertauk. It is 
now learned that the Car company is 
figuring on us ng the same dock as the 
steel company for its receipts by water, 
coal, etc. It ^ intended to build an 
elevated incUae way in some manner, 
connecting tne docks with the car works 
buildings and haul up material of all 
classes to the shops in that way. 

The funeral of O. C. King occurs Fri 
day at 10 o'clock. Services at the house. 
Interment at Forest Hill cemetery. 
Mrs. M. ,J. Rogers of Cleveland, mother 
of the widow, and Geo. F. King, brother 
of the de<;eased will arrive here in time 
for the funeral. 

Five more cars were shipped from the 
Car works yesterday. These, like the 
Ave that preceded them, are to be loaded 
with Imperial flour and sent over the 
South Shore. The works are building 
three cars a day now. As stocks of all 
materials needed are accumulated, and 
the force is increased, this will be more 
than doubled in a short time. 

The village hall building is up and 
village orders have been issued for its 
cost and an election has been held totlay 
to see about paying for it. If the voter's 
of West Duluth think that the officers 
who attend to their business should be 
housed less comfortably than drunkards 
and criminals, they may defeat the pro- 
position. But thev don't think so. Shall 
the village hall and prison \je paid for 
some years hence when the valuation is 
greater than now, or shall the orders 
w hich have been issued be paid out of 
the Hrst taxes? 



KILGORE & SIEWERT 

Will soon make a lively stir in 

Hats - and - Men's . Farnistiings. 

AWAIT DEVELOPMENTS. 



Fine- 



Remember the place, St. Louis Hotel Block. 



THE NEXT 



MOZART. 

Week ; Some 



The Concert to be Held Next 
MuHic Notes, 

The next Mozart concert will be held 
a week from tomorrow at Temple Opera. 
The program is now in preparation and 
will comprise musical and vocal num- 
bers by both professional artists and 
amateurs. The numbers will be most 
oarsfully selected, and nothing but what 
is meritorious will be given a place on 
the program. The details of arranging 
the program are in the hands of Mr. 
Tonning, subject to the approval of the 
music committee of the association. It 
is probable that the Apollo club will 
give a couple of numbers at the Febru- 
ary concert. 

Several members of the Apollo club 
met last night at the studio of Mr. H. P. 
Robinson. After having sung them- 
selves into a state of enthusiasm it be- 
came the sense of the meeting that to die 
was not gain, and the organization will 
from now on take a new lease of life. 

A new musical organization will 
shortly be formed under the leadership 
of Frank Hoare, for the purpose of giv- 
ing some of the light operas. The or- 
ganization will include some of the best 
musical talent in the city. 

The directors of Walkers Military 
band wishes it understood that it will 
not play at the West End rink. 



- THE C ALL IS SUED. 

Republican Call for Caucuii and Convention 
to be Held Next Week. 

All legally qualifl d voters who Intend to 
vote for the rei)ul)lican candidates for the 
various offlces to l>e filled In the city of Duluth 
on Kcbruury 4, IwiHl, at the regrular city elec- 
tion, arc hereby notified that caucuses will be 
licld between the liuura of 5 aud t« p. ni., on 
Jai'Uiiry 'U, ISSK), for tlie purpose of eloctlnif 
dclojfates to the city republican convention. 

Tlie places for hohllni): caucuses und the 

reclnct is 



g caucuses 
iilfh each precl 
entitled have been establisbeii as follow: 



nuinl)er of dek-jfatefl to which each 



Fonnd Frozen. 

A man was found near Sixth avenue 
west last night, nearly frozen to death. 
He had evidently been drinking. He 
was taken t<^ the lock-up. This is the 
second case this year of men being found 
sleeping in the snow, drunk. 

PERSONAL. 



WHERE IS NORTH DAKOTA? 

Why Doesn't It Help Its Own Starring 
I'eople .After Promising: To? 

The officials of Nelson county. North 
Dakota, have is.sued another appeal for 
help from Duluth. The statement is 
made that 4(100 i)eople are in want, many 
of whom have not the commonest neces- 
sities of life. It seems strange that, in 
the face of these appeals, the state offi- 
cials of North Dakota should declare 
that no great suffering exists in this 
county, and that they can take care of 
all destitute. 

The county has been visited by sev- 
eral Duluthians recently, and all report 
that the tales of hunger heard of Nelson 
county are true. A car load of go<jds 
has already been forwarded from Du 
luth. and a consiilerable sum of money 
as well. The [lecjple need all they can 
get, and more clothing, etc., will probably 
be sent to them. 



STREET RAILW AY MEN. 

Officers of the Itulutli Railway Company 

in Session Today. 

Hon. Samuel Hill, president of the 
Duluth street railway company, accom- 
panied by Major Thoa Wilson of St. 
Paul, a director of the company, arrived 
last night for the purpose of attending 
the annual meeting of directors. The 
Duluth directors, fi. (;. Hartley and O. 
C. Chase, were present, and W. W. 
Billson, the company's attorney. 

The forenoon and the greater ixjrtion 
of the afternoon was pa.ssed in discussing 
contemplated improvements for the com 
ing season. The various electric systems 
were discussed and the unanimous 
opinion was that the city should be given 
the best service that could be obtained. 
No definite conclusion was reached on 
this head up to the time The Herald 
went to press. 



NEW INVES TMENT COMPANY. 

W*st Dnlutli Investment Company Or- 
ganized Today With Large Capital. 

The West Duluth Investment com- 
pany has filed articles. It is comt>osed 
of J. D. Stryker, H. W. Coffin, E. W. 
Matter, S. T. Harrison of Duluth, and 
Martin McMinn, Eveleth W. McCor- 
mick and Charles W. Hoyt of West Du- 
luth. The principal place for the trans- 
action of business is name!r at West Du- 
luth and the capital stock is 8100,000, 
the limit of indebtedness half that 
amount. The corporation begins Feb. 1, 
1890 and runs thirty years. The stock 
is to be paid in monthly instalments of 
il per share. The board of directors 
consists of the seven gentlemen named 
divided as follows: C. W. Hoyt, Eve- 
leth McCormick, one year; E. 
W. Matter, H. W. Coffin, two 
years; J. D. Stryker, M. 

McMinn, S. T. Harrison, three years. 

The officers of the company are as fol- 
lows: President, J. D. Stryker; vice- 
president, Eteleth W. McCormick; sec- 
retary, Martin L. McMinn; treasurer, 
Elmer W. Matter; attorney, Samuel T. 
Harrison. The annual meeting will be 
held in West Duluth on the first Satur- 
day in February. The new corporation 
will deal largely in West Duluth realty, 
and will make a very solid business asso- 
ciation. 

See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. Macf.\ri..anf. & Austin. 



IS STILL_ 
The State of the 



DEFICIENT. 

Supply Bad 



Prepare for the grand skating carnival 
at the West End Parlor skating rink. 
Twenty-first avenue west and Superior 
street, Friday evening, Jan. 17. Three 
good prizes to be given away, one for the 
finest ladies suit, and one to the gentle- 
man with finest suit, also one to the per- 
son wearing the most comical suit. 
Come and have a good time. Walker's 
mihtarj band will furnish music. 

r. M. Erickson, Proprietor. 
Capt.S. G. Johnson, Manager. 

Children's (iarnients 

At auction in the St. Louis old dining- 
room. Hale from 2 to 6 p. m. and 7 to 9 
p. m. 



Water 
Ever. 

There was a fresh break on the water 
main on Fifteenth avenue and First 
street, an immense volume of water 
escaping and running down Fourteenth 
avenue and from thence to Bench. This 
will take some time to repair, and the 
water supply is consequently in the same 
condition as yesterday. The volume of 
water has bursted into the storm sewer 
on New York avenue. 

There is likely to be a great deal of 
trouble with the water supply for some 
time. One of the causes of the trouble 
in addition to those stated in The Her- 
ald yesterday, was that where the break 
on Bench street occurred, the ditch had 
been left open which caused the main to 
freeze and burst. This was undoubted- 
ly a piece of negligence on the part of 
some one. There is a great deal of 
trouble on Third street, many of the 
services pipes being frozen and several 
bu rated, and the water supply being cut 
off entirely. The city is still in danger 
of being entirely without water supply 
in case of fire. None of the elevators 
which use hydraulic pressure are 
running. 

The lower streets of the EJast End are 
flooded, and street cars can only get to 
Thirteenth avenue. Jce has formed on 
the roadway and over the street car 
tra<-k8 a foot thick making the streets 
impassable. All the water east of Lake 
avenue and above First street was 
turned off last night, and in several 
residences with steam apparatus were 
compelled to put out furnace fires, or 
run them so low that the houses were 
without heat. 

Owing to low pressure and an absence 
of all running water many of the intake 
pipes leading from the mains to private 
residences and buildings of all classes, 
have frozen and burst and the houses of 
C. A. Long and W. W. Billson were 
flooded. Many others complain from 
the same cause. The Gas &, Water com- 
pany says the breaks will be mended 
today and the mains put in working 
order. 

There is a broken hydrant on Fourth 
avenue west which has necessitated 
shutting off the water at the St. Louis 
hotel and other buildings in its vicinitv. 



Alderman Long has recovered from a 
severe attack of the grip. 

.\ son was born to Mr. and Mrs. John 
Panton yesterday afternoon. 

Alex Michaud will return this evening 
from a month's visit in Quebec. 

Mr. S. L. Merchant returned last even- 
ing from a long stay in New York. 

Mrs. E. P. Emerson returned yester- 
day from a visit to New York and Bos- 
ton. 

Louis Loeb and sister left yesterday 
over the Northern Pajific for a visit to 
Seattle. 

Judge Stearns was the recipient of a 
pleasant little surprise party last night' 
the occasion of his fifty-ninth birthday. 

Mr. R S. Munger and Mr. Ettenger, 
the latter of the Minnesota Iron Car 
company, return from New York tomor- 
row. 

Miss Alice Butchard was ciJled to 
Quebec this morning by a telegni.i an- 
nouncing the serious illness of a lela 
tive. 

Daniel Cox was a passenger on this 
morning's Omaha, bound for a tour 
along the Pacific coast. He will return 
to Duluth via New Orleans and Chicago. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McGonagle re- 
turned last night from Methven, Mass. 
and Philadelphia, Pa., where they have 
been visiting. Mrs. McGonagle has been 
absent sometime. 

Ex-Lieutenant-Governor Sam S. Fi- 
field of Ashland, arrived in Duluth last 
night for a brief visit with Capt. Tom 
Pressnell. Mr. Fifield has recently been 
appointed postmaster of Ashland. 

Wallace Warner left for Bayfield this 
morning to be absent till Satur day 

City Engineer Fuller's child is dan- 
gerously ill. 

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. 
Blackenhorn died of inanition this morn- 
ing. 

City Comptroller Tenbrook has re- 
turned to his post of duty after a couple 
of da:'8 absence in St. Paul. 

Tht news of the death of Mrs. M. J. 
O'Bri jn, on Dec. 28, at Warren, 111., has 
just riachetl Duluth. She was 56 years 
old, and was well-known here. Herald 
readers will remember her husband, M. 
J. O'Brien, who died last July, who for a 
long time was manager for Wolf & Truax 
in Duluth. Husband and wife died in 
the same room, in the same house, five 
months apart. 

Register 'Kesume, 

At The Spalding: A. Steward, W. G. 
Robertson, T. E. Hansen, Ben Romanson, 

F. D. Hagar, J. R. McMurran, J. P. Con 
nell, St. Paul; C. M. Brooks, J. D. Pe- 
rigo, New York; J. K. Stearns, Daven- 
port, la.; F. J. Flynn, J. H. Chandler, B. 

G. Kerr, Louis Templeau, Chicago; T. J. 
Sw«n, Boston; R. A. Kilgore, Philadel- 
phia; J. H. Reynolds, J. Brady, W. A. 
Morris Minneapolis. 

At the St. Louis: R J. Clements, 
Milwaukee; A. D. Douglas, N. Perkins, 
E. J. Trueshall, L. A. Lukly, St. Paul; 
J. W. Cushing, Chicago; William Hug- 
gen, W. F. Smith, Minneapolis. 

At the Merchants: B. D. Rose, F. 
Kilbourn, St. Paul; R G. Woodford, 
Minneapolis; J. G. Hern, Wyoming; L. 
Howiand, Green Bay; Louis Pratt, Ne- 
gaunee; Ed Williams, Marquette; Will 
Annear, Ishpeming. 



First ward -Asa Daley's lumber office, 433 
Lake avenue south. 

Second ward— James McBeth's store. East 
Superior .street. 

Third ward. First Precinct— Store building. 
First avenue east and Hrst street. 

Second precinct—Sil Kast Superior street. 

Third precinct— East End livery barn. 

Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
street. 

Second precinct— 319 West Superior street. 

Third precinct— 701 West Superior street. 

Fifth ward, First preeiuct— ltiU5 West Su- 
perior street. 
TSecoud precinct— aSC Garfield avenue. 

Third precinct— I'.riJ West -Michigan street. 

Sixth ward-iSI West Michigan street. 

Tlie basis of reprt>sentatiou has been fixed at 
one delegate to each KJii votes or maj r frac- 
tion thereof cast for tlic republican candidate 
at the lust presidential election, and one dele- 
gate at large for each precinct. 

Each ward is entitled to the following repre- 
sentation: First ward, 4 delegates; Second 
ward, 3 delegHtcs; Third ward. First precinct 
4 delegates; Second prcclnt, 3 delegates: Third 
precinct. ;i delegates: Fourth ward. First pre- 
cinct, i") delegates; Second precinct, 4 delegates; 
Third precinct, 3 delegates; Fifth ward. First 
precinct, 3 d«legates; Second precinct, 4 dele- 
gates. Third precinct, 3 delegates; Sixth ward, 
.1 delegates. 

JAMCS DlNQWALL, 

John H. LaVaquk, 
P. 8. Anneke. 
Chaiii.bs Duncan, 
H. S. LoKi), 
S. M . Lestbr, 
City Republican Com. 

Call for City Republican Convention. 

All duly electe<l delegates to the city repub- 
lican convention will mi>t!t I i the council room 
at the city hall, nuluth, Minnesota, on Jan. 26, 
IfSM, at 2 p. m., for the purpose of placing In 
uouiliiatlon republican cuiididutes for the var- 
ious offices as follows: Mayor; two aldermen, 
I'lrstward; one alderman, St>cond ward; one 
alderman. Third ward; one alderman. Fourth 
ward; one alderman. Fifth ward; one alder- 
man. Sixth ward. 

M. (). Hall, Chairman Com. 

In Second Ward. 

It is understood that Ben Howard is 
riot to be the only candidate for repub- 
lican caucus nomination as alderman 
from the Second ward. There is quite 
general talk now of D. J. Sinclair, and 
it is quite probable he will run. If he 
should dedide to do so he would be a 
good man and would poll a large vote. 



4^/ 





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.i^ 



SACRIFICE SALE 





Will continue Ffteen Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE 
MUST REDUCE, even at agre#t loss. 
Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence," Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

S7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $15. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Good:;. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at leas : $i 5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us tc take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 



M. S. BURROWS & CO. 



o 
q 

id 



UJ 

u 
cc 
O 

O 

co 

t 

(0 



PIONEER EUEL CO., 



Do Von Want Cloaks. 

Big auction sale at St. Louis' old 
ingroom, commencing Saturday at 
G p. m., and 7 to t) p. m. 



din- 
2 to 




WBATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. IC. —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinitv for 24 hours commencino 10 a.m. 
today: Fair weather; nearly station- 
ary temperature. 

Observes, Signal Office. 



COAL 


CROSS CREEK LERIGH. 

EREE BURNING, 

AilHRAClIE I BITUMINOUS, 


rr 


WOOD 


Dry Maple, 

Hard mixed. 

Slabs, 

Edgia^H. 


CONNELLSVILLE 
llnil GAS HOUSE. 


COKE 



ORDERS P^OMPTiy OtLIVERED 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 

This powder never vanes. A marvel of pur- 
ity, Btreni^h and wholesomeness. More eco- 
nomical than the ordloary kinds, and 
aannot be sold In competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weight, alum or phos- 
phate powders. Sold onlv in cans. Royal 
Baking Powder Co., 108 Wall street, N. Y. 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 




PORTRAITS! 



A LIFE-SIZ[ PORTRAIT GIVEN M WITHv" PURCHASE 

OF $ I 5 OR OVER. 

Commencing Monday, JAN. I 3, and continuing for a short 
time only, we will give away to every customer buying eoods 
amounting to $ I 5 or over, a lite-size Portrait of himself or any 
other person whom he may wish, guaranteeing the work to be 
perfect in every respect, as samples in our window will prove 
This, in connection with our 

Red Figure Mark ■ Down Sale 

Gives yoL 



r,^. .K.>^ ^^^^ *^^" *" *^^ profit, but, as in the past, we are 
?K° 0*^2,° be FOREMOST and LIBERAL, always giving yol 
the BEST goods at the LOWEST prices, and something well 
worth ha>Mng to remember us by besides. 



/ 




YARD: 
Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



For Sale 



iV 



Do Vuu Want Cloaks. 

Bij{ auction sale at St. Louis' old 
ingroom, commencing Saturdav at 
6 p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. 



din- 
2 to 



I>anclnK and Deportment. 

Prof. JameaS. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 



Mr. PrentU-e'H Notice. 

In justice to Mr. Frederick Prentice, 
who is pressing his claim to an un- 
divided one-half in the Third DiviBion 
here in the proper channel of the courts, 
it should be stated that he has at no 
time made any overtures or solicita- 
tions for the settlement of his claim byany 
lx)dy, being entirely content to await the 
final authoritative decision of the court 
of last appeal. In the face of this part, 
The Herald's head-line yesterday over a 
simple notice of his presence in the city 
in response to calls upon him, did him 
an unintentional injustice. As a busi- 
ness method of answering applications 
which have been made to him 
we desired to announce simply 
that he will be at The Spalding for 
two or three days, prior to leaving for 
New York, where any party wishing to 
see him on business connected with the 
property, or desiring to effect a settle- 
pient, can do so. Mr. Prentice says he 
is lead to make this announcement from 
the fact that such men as Messrs. Men- 
denhall, Miller, Harrington, Peyton, 
Macfarlane, Spencer, Forbes, Upham, 
VVilliams, and a number of other leading 
citizens have settled, and several others 
are arranging to do bo. it was at their 
suggestion that Mr. Prentice returned 
here again before going East. The case 
which is to decide the matter will come 
up in the United States court at St. Paul 
soon. 

I can sell a few choice properties on 
Central and Grand avenueson small cash 
payments to good parties. 

John D. Gili., 
over Postoffice, Duluth. 

"The Battles and Leaderb of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



mmm mii 



Notice Is hereby piven that the partnership 
formerly exist i UK between A. M. OrlfBu and 
H. i. Bellepercbc is this day dissolved by 
mutual ci)n?ent, the business to bo hereafter 
i-onductcd by K. F Belleporche, under the old 
firm name, viz.: A. M. Griflin & Co. K. F. 
Ik'lleperche will settle and collect all ac- 
counts. 

(Sjgrned) A. M. GRiKin.v, 

, , RE.MY F. illl.LEPKRCHE. 

Jan. 16, 18fl0. 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— A.VD— 

INSURANCE. 

2, Exchange Qldg. 

MINN. 



Rooms I 
DULUTH, 




rtG, 




327 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

GROUhO FLOOi). 

OPPOSITE ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 
OfFeisthe following 

ACRES AND LOTS 



FORT! ACfiFS 



-IN THE- 



EAST END 



-AT A 



IBiWm 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 



This bez utiful property lies just above Oneota. and is about three-quarters 
of a rnilefrcm Short Line depot. It is platted topographically; large sized 
lots, 33xl2£ feet; the view from it splendid; the prices are low, and the 
terms are the very best. So situated that all city improvetnents must enhance 
Its values. 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



MACFARUiNE & AUSTIN, 



WEST DULUTH. 



DULUTH. 



Mortgage Sale. 




am. 



-IN— 



SUPERIOR 



500 Acres at Haywood Sta- 
tion, on line of Omaha, with 
800,000 feet of pine, at $7 
per acre; one-half cash. 

280 Acres in sections 4 and 
5, tp. 47, at $ I 7 per acre, 
2 Lots on West Sixth street. 

10 " " Eighth '• 

Block 7, West I 5th street. 
<< 1 " " '• 

Block on East 23d str:et; 
very cheap. 

I have a deal in acres that 
will take but $600, in which 
there is big money. Come and 
«e» me. \ have the exclusive 
sale of the above. 



Terms - Veif - 




us, 



".? 



creage near the city 
limits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



Default having: been made In the payment 
of thesuinof (hree liundied and sixty 5(l-KI0 
dollai-s, iHm) 60 100) prlnciual and interest which 
is i'lalmed to \ e due at the date of this notice 
upon accrtalt mortgragre duly executed and 
dilivert-d by F auk Doyle.a bachelor.toJani. s 
B. Howard and Alexander H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth lay of November, A. D. IfW, 
and duly recorded In the office of the register 
of deeds In and for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the 12th day of 
November A. D. 18X8. at 9 o'clock a.m., in 
book "26" of I Qortgag^^s, on pag:e 362; and no 
action or proco.'dlnjrac law or otherwls-e hav- 
ing l)ecn instil utod to recover the debt so- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part thereof: 

Now, thereto -e, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a lower of sale contained In said 
mortgage, and tursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said mortgage 
will be for«clo(ed, and the premises descrl lied 
in and covered by said mortgage, viz: LiOts 
numlKjred six Ci), seven (7> and eight (8i and 
the northeast quarter (ne^u) of the southeast 
quarter (se!*) of section numbered twenty-two 
(22), all In township No. sixty-one (61) north of 
range No. twel'-e(12) west of the fourth (4th) 
principal merit Ian, In St. Louis county, and 
state of Mlnnes :ita, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, will l>e sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and Interest, an \ the taxes (If any) on said prem- 
ises, and twent; •-live dollars, attorney's fees, 
as stipulated in and by said mortgage In ctise 
of foreclosure, iiud the disbursements allowed 
by law; which i,ale will be made by the sheriff 
of said St. Ix>uii. county, at the front door of 
the court house, In the city of Duluth. in said 
county and state, on the 2"Jtb da^ 
of January, A. I). 1«W, at 10:;«) o'clock a m. on 
that day, subjec t to redemption at any time 
withlu one year from the day of sale, as pro- 
vided by law. 
Dated Decemlier 13th, A. D. 1889. 



A. FITGER & CCS 

Lake Soperior Bref ery 



Tb the largest in the Stat« sf Mlc netsota ot] 
of the Twii Cltlei, 



aide 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Pawlflc Short Line, 



DITLITTH TOSCrPKRIOR. 



B. N 



Marble, 
Att<irn }y. 
Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-11-18-35. 



James B. Howard, 

and 
Alexander H. Davis, 
Mortgagees. 



Except Sunday... 
Except Sunday... 
Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Kxciept Sunday. . . 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . . 



Leave 
Duluth 



6 30 am 
T 35 am 

8 56 am 

10 (10 am 
1135 am 

1 10 pm 
215 pm 

3 26 pm 
3:»pm 

4 00 pm 

4 35 pm 

5 40 pm 

6 46 pm 

7 15 pm 

9 26 pm 

11 10 pm 



Leave | Arrive 
W. Sup'rISuperior 



652 am 

8 0^ am 

9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 
1 35 pm 
2.37 pm 
3 47 pm 



6 45 am 

7 55 am 
9 loam 

10 15 am 

11 50 am 
12«pm 

2 3 1 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 

4 50 pm 

5 55 pm 
7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 46 pm 

1127 pm 



4 26 pm 
4 67 pm 

6 02 pm 

7 07 pm 



115.3 pm 



SCPKRIOB TO DCLUTH. 



s 



Notice to Contfactofs. 



Dally 

Except Sunday.. 

Dally .. 

Except Sunday. . 
Except Sunday.. 

DaUy ... 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . 



700 am 7 



Leave Leave l 
Superior W. Sup'r 



6 45 am 
07 am 
40 am 
817 am 
932 am 

10 66 am 
11 15 am 
12 42 pm 

162 pm 
3O0pm 
4 16 pm 
6 13 pm 
6 10 pm 
6 17 pm 
7aipm 

11 62 pm 



8 10 am 

9 25 am 

10 ih am 

11 05 am 

12 :i') pm 
1 45 pm 

3 60 pm 

4 (15 pm 
6 06 pm 



610 pm 

7a)pm 

1145 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

705 am 
723 am 

7 55 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 
11 10 am 
1130 am 

100 pm 
3 07 pm 

3 15 pm 

4 30 pm 
6 30 pm 
6 86 pm 

6 35 pm 

7 46 pn. 
12 10 am 



"V rthem Pacific Railroad. 



Dining Cars on Pacific 
Express Trains. 



1 Care of Herald, Duluth. 



Sealed proposi. is will be received at the of- 
fice of the undei signed until the 35th day of 
January, IHHO, f( r the ercKJtii.n and completion 
of 150 dwelling houses, more or less, at West 
Duluth, Minn, ; or the Minnesota Iron Car 
company, accon ing to plans and speciflcntlons 
prepared by the underslgneti and now on file 
at his office. Ea;h contractor estimating on 
this work will b< re<iuired to submit with his 
proposal, a properly executed bfjud of two 
reeiK)nsil)le sure ;ies In the sum of 8500 as a 
guarantee that 1 1 case the contract is awarded, 
he will within a 'easonable time e:<ecute acou- 
tract and bond s itlsfactory to the owners. 

The owners reterve the right to reject any 
or all bids. 

O. G. TgAMAGEN, 

„ ■■ 1 Architect. 

Booms510, 611, 5l2and613Flr8iin[tiOBal bank 
building, Dulu >h, Minn. .(» 



Leave Arrive 
i Duluth Duluth 
' Dally. Daily 



Pacific Express (limited) for 
Fargo, Helena, Butte, Ta- 
coma, Seattle and Portland, 
Grand Forks. Grafton, Win 
nlpeg 

Dakota Express, for Fergus 
Falls,. Wahpeton, ''argo, 
Jamestown and intermediate 
points 

Chicago Express, for Ashland, 
Milwaukee, Chicago and all 
Wisconsin Central and Mil- 
waukee, Lake Shore & West- 
ern points 



3.80 pm 



7.16 pm 



6.26 pm 



4.00 pm 



All trains dally 

Duluth on Dakota , 

m . Free Colonist sieepe; 
Express leaving Duluth at 3:30 

« JNO. C ROE.„^„.,, 

Ticket Afent, Ualoa Depot. 



Through sleeper from 
express leaving at 7:16 j>, 
rs are run on PaoiM 
it 3:30 p. m. 
JNO. C KOBINSON 




g:.'.' . .. , gc 



f 



»^»hw w :m -j< ii »i»w»»kw»— 





I 



/ 



/ 



I 



P 



I 



) , 



I 



I 



I 




/ 



h 








ACRES 


Near 


Short Line Park on railroad. 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326;West Superior Street. 



Slinu Ihtovcaltoomy 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



VOL. 7; ^O. 245. 




FOR BARGAINS 



—SEE— 



E.CC. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDINO 



DULUTH, MINN.,liliIDAY, JAXLAHY 17, 1890. 



Do you Want to BofFow Money? LAST [QITION. 



We can let you have it and without delay. 

MONEY ON HAND 

Provided you have sufficient security. 



BULLOT BOX fOBGEBY. 



AUSTRALIAN SYSTEM. 



Rec- 



Testimony Seems to 
Conclusively What 
Trouble Was. 



Show 
the 



Oiir Rates are the Lowest Obtainatile ! 



Doings at Washington Today; 

The Blaine Pall 

Bearers. 



in 




Applications for loans wanted at once 

BULUia WEST DULUTH Ofi WEST SUPERIOR 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



URGE - 3R - SMIILL - 




We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 

SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



k 



All cash. 




Beal fcstate. ftcres 'and Business Pfoperty a Specialty. 

Call and see what we have. 




FIRE 



INSURANCE. 



The best Foreign and American Companies rep 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



LOUIS LENA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 
West Superior street, has opened at 



26 



28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



T 



With a complete stock of 



1 




f 




L 


y 



\ 




Imported and Homestic Cigars 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Pine Cut aod Plug Tobaccos, [tc. 



WASHijfGTO.N, Jan. 17.— Ex-Governor 

Foraker uoatinued his testimony before 
the house committee of investigation 
of the ballot box forgery this morning. 
He said that after parting with Wood, 
he got a letter from him on Aug 17, say- 
ing that Crosstey (who had the contract) 
was absent: that Mayor Mosby was favor- 
ably inclined towards his application for 
a position as smoke inspector; that a 
line from him (witness) would help the 
application; and that as soon as the in- 
spector matter was settled, he (Wood) 
would go to Washington and get such 
infurmation as might be secured in the 
other matter. 

Witness replied that Wood should get 
the letter of recommendation from him, 
as he had promised when he (witness) 
got the information Wood had promised, 
and not before. 

On the 2l8t witness got a note from 
W^ood saying he had valuable papers and 
wanted to see him for fifteen minutes. 
Witness saw Wood, who produced a let- 
ter signed W. M. Langdon, dated Detroit, 
Aug. 19, addressed to W^ood, which 
seemed to confirm Wood's previous story 
that an elFort was being made to secure 
Gov. Alger's signature to new contracts, 
which witness did not have now. They 
had no relevancy to what the witness 
was interested in and he made no use of 
them. 

AV'ith respect to the gun contract, 
Wood produced a letter, dated United 
States patent otlice, Aug. G, 1887, ad- 
dressed to him, and saying that Lieut. 
Wm. H. Bell had secured a patent for 
improvement in gun carriages, and the 
copies of sj>ecificatiou would be fur- 
nished ujKjn application. Another letter 
said that Lieut, and Capt. Bell were the 
same person, and added that Peter would 
help in the Dods worth case. Wood said 
that Col. L. C. Campbell and (Jovernor 
Campljell had been buying up and get- 
ting control of a number of inventions 
relating to ordnance. These were 
a part only of a number of papers 
he had that had been submitted 
to him for investigation. Wood . anted 
a letter of introduction to President Har- j 
rison. Witness gave W^ood the lett -r 
and wrote that he expected him with 
the letter not later than Thursday. The 
letter commended Wood as an old 
soldier and inventor of merit. Septem- 
ber 9th Wood telegraphed witness from 
Cincinnati, asking where he could see 
him. Witness was impatient and re- 
plied that he could see him at appointed 
place. Wood was not to hesitate alxjut 
getting facts and staying with 
Foraker during the campaign. W^itness 
never had any communication with Hall 
until after the election. Witness called 
particular attention to these letters, for 
it would appear from another witness 
that the paper was not forged until the 
next day after Wood had written that he 
had the paper. Previous to that, on 
Sept. 7, witness had a conversation with 
Mayor Moseby, about W'ood's applica 
tion for the place of smoke in8pector,and 
succeeded in having action deferred. 
Sept. 11 Wood came to Columbus and 
brought the forged paper. The first 
thing witness found that he did not ex- 
pect to see was the name of Senator 
Sherman. He had understood that the 
paper bore the names of Messrs. Butter- 
worth, McKinley and McPherson. Wood 
said that he was surprisctl to see, as it 
was not on the paper when he tirst saw 
it. 

Witness said he accepted the paper 
without question as to its genuiness. It 
led to all the mortification he had ex- 
perienced about this wbole letter. As 
any honorable man, would, he felt mor- 
tified that he had been imposed upon by 
that paper, which, in the light of sub- 
sequent events, it appeared should not 
have deceived him, but preliminary 
statements had prepared his mind for it. 



The New Uallol, With AuinndiuenU 
ouiiuenrted For Mi>r>lanil. 

Annapolis, Jan. 17.— Senator Poe in 
the legislature, introduced the Austra- 
lian ballot box bill recommended by the 
Business Mens club, with amendments. 
The amendments provide that ballot 
clerks in all counties are to beapinjinted 
by the governor. An unofficial ballot, 
printed on paper of different color from 
ollicial ballot, may be taken into th© poll- 
ing room by voter, marked in advance, 
to assist him in making his official bal 
lot. This amendment is copied from the 
Xew York bill. 

An express provision is made for ad- 
mission into the polling room of federal 
oflicials appointed under the revised 
statutes of the United States, and of an 
equal number of state officials, whom 
the governor is to appoint for the coun- 
ties, and whom supervisors of election 
are to appoint for the city of Baltimore. 



WOBLD'S FAIB OUESIION. 



Great Interest Is Manifested 
it in the House 
Today. 



in 



PJilCB THKliai CEXTS. 



The Resolution to Appoint 
Special Committee 
Passes. 



Bliii-kuinil b> » .Sport. 

Chu-aoo, Jan. 17.— The case of Mrs. 
Lena Edwards of Memphis, Tem., who 
was arrested some two wee»co goon the 
charge of olitaining money under lalse 
pretenses from Bob Church, the well- 
known gambler and sport of that city is 
on the docket for disposal by .Judge 
Clifford in the circuit court totlay. 'J'he 
defendant, who is a woman of extraor- 
dinary beauty, claims that tlio scheme 
to take her to Tennessee is bl ickmail. 
According to her story she repelled 
Church's advance and he is taking this 
method of getting even. 



Interstate AHsociation Formed. 

PHiLAnKLi'uiA, Jan. 17.— The conven- 
tion of non-partisan temi)erance women 
wjis resumed today at the hall of tiie 
Sunday School union. It was decided 
to form an interstate association and Ui 
send delegates to the coming national 
convention at Cleveland. liesolutions 
were adopted declining to further ap- 
prove, by remaining in the W. C. T. U., 
of a policy that_con8cience and judgment 
condemned, and urging an active na- 
tionnl campaign in the interest on non- 
partisan Christian temperance work. 

Tired of KnicUnh .Syntiioateii. 
St. Louis, Mo , Jan. 17.- The English 
syndicate is seeking a renewal of its 
option on the United elevators in this 
city. Yesterday J. Brooks Johnson made 
the elevator company a proposition for 
an option on a majority of the sto<jk at 
870 a share, good until the first of July, 
for which he agreed to put up 810,<XXt 
cash at the Bank of Commerce, to l)e 
forfeited if the option was not taken and 
to go in as part of the purchase price if 
the deal was closed. Mr. Johnson was 
told that the company was sick of Eng- 
lish syndicates and that no such option 
would be given to anybody. 



Superior Itelt Line. 

Madison, Jan. 17.— A patent has been 
issued for the construction of the Su- 
perior Belt Line railway, the same to be 
wholly within the county of Douglas, and 
to extend from some point on the St. 
Louis bay through, in and around the 
city of Superior and surrounding terri- 
I tory of Al>juez bay, and thence to the 
I place of beginning, as near as practica- 
ble. The capital stock is «I,2.j0,00U and 
the incorporators are Frank A. Flower, 
Franklin G. Wilson, John Mather, Frank 
A. Ross and Howard J. Campbell of Su- 
perior, and James B. Thaver of River 
Falls. 

C>eutll<;!> VM. Muriuoim. 

Salt Lake, Utah, Jan. 17. -According 
to present indications the Mormon ele- 
ment will be defeated at the municipal 
election which takes place next month. 
Both the Gentiles and the saints are 
working like beavers, but the opponents 
of the latter are making a desp.irate 
effort to break the political power of 
the church, and the chances of their suc- 
cess are good. 



Washington, Jan. 17. — Great interest 
was taken in the vote on the W^orld's fair 
question today. Members representing 
cities were active in consolidating their 
forces and in keeping their men in line. 
Dozens of members kept tally, and every 
vote was closely scanned. The most 
energetic of the Chicago men were 
Messrs. Cannon. Mason. Lawler and 
Springer. The Missouri troops were 
marshaled l)y Messrs. Hatch, Dockery, 
Frank and Bland, while the New York 
interests were attended to by Messrs. 
Flower, Farquhar and Cummings. 

The result of the fight was that a spe- 
cial committee of nine members will be 
appointed, without receiving any in- 
structions. It may choose a site if it 
sees fit, but it is mora probable that the 
determination of that question will be 
relegated to the house. 

Washinoton, Jan. 17.— In the house 
this morning question recurred on the 
adoption of the resolution, as follows: 
"Resolved, That a select committee of 
thirteen members be appointed bv the 
speaker to be called "The World's" Fair 
Committee." to which shall be referred 
all matters relating to the proposed cole 
bration of the 40(»th anniversary of the 
discovery of .\merica, or the World's 
fair of 18!)2." The resolution was 
adopted— yeas, 141; nays, 13(>. Mr. 
Springor of Illinois, changing his vote 
from negative to allirmative, in order to 
enter a motion to reconsider. 

Mr. Springer said that he only desired 
that the c»mmittee should be instructed 
to reiwrt next week to the house, a plan 
by which a location might be selected. 
As it now stood the committee would be 
authorized to select a location. He with 
drew his motion to reconsider, stating 
that he would trust to the fairness of 
the committee and of the house. Mr. 
Flower, of New York, introduced the 
New York World's fair bill, and it was 
referred to the special committee when 
appointed. 



BELIEVE IN TIMBE R CULTURE. 

NebriiNka HortlialturMliiitM Wjint the Av 
Tented in Good Faith. 
Llncoln, Neb., Jan. 17.- An importani 
memorial to congress has been adopted 
by the Nebraska Horticultural Societv 
which IS in session in this city. 

It protests againet a movement which 
has lately been organized to secure tht 
repeal of the timt>er culture act. It ad 
mits that there have been frauds prac 
tioed on the general government undei 
this act, but suggests closer inspection 
and stricter construction of the laws, so 
that the party entering may understand 
that the government requires that he 
shall grow trees, and tliat the objects of 
the act shall not be fulfilled until every 
requirement is complied with. They as- 
sert there is hardly any portion of laud 
east of the liocky mountains on which 
timber cannot successfully be 
without irrigation. 



grown 



A PRIN TER K ILLED. 

Thrown Out of a. Saloon With .Such Forve 
i«H t<» Fracture His Skull. 

Kan.sas City, Mo., Jan. 17. -Charles 
M. Davenport, a printer, received injuries 
last night from the hands of some un- 
kriown person or persons, from which he 
died this morning. He was knocked 
down by a violent blow, the back of his 
head striking the pavement. His skull 
was fractured. 

He and a companion, named Louis 
Day, went to a saloon and became noisy 
after they had a drink or two of whisky 
John Waters, the bartender, and Tate 
White, the colored porter, tried to put 
them out. Waters took hold of ] )ay and 
White of Davenport. They took the men 
to the swinging doors and pushed them 
through. White probably struck Daven- 
port, the appearance of the dead man's 
face indicating that he did. White evi- 
dently pushed Davenport to the street 
and then struck him, his feet slipping 
from under him, and throwing him vio- 
lently to the stone pavement. The police 
will hold White for the coroner's in- 
^quest. Davenport leaves a wife and four 
children. 

EFFECTS ON FISH TRADE. 



PREPARING FOR TRAFFIC. 

The RailroatU Alieatly Freparin^ for a 
Tremendouii Ore Traflic-. 

Negaunkj.;, Mich., Jan. 17.— The rail- 
roads are making extensive preparations 
for handling the ore traffic of the ap- 
proaching season. The Chicago & North- 
western road has decided to equip all its 
twenty-ton ore cars w ith air brakes, and 
a large number of cars are now in the 
shops at P^Iscanaba being supplied with 
the appa-atus. The cars tlius provided 
with power brakes will be used in haul- 
ing ore from the mines on tlie ( Jogebic 
range to the lake at Escanaba. The 
haul between tiiese points is a long one 
and time is an important factor in hand- 
ore from that range. The use of air 
brakes will permit the ore trains to run 
at a greatly increased speed, and it will 
reduce the danger uf accident, for a 
loaded ore train when in motion is a 

with 
is mak- 
ing a number of improvements on its 
docks at Escanaba this winter, and it 
will be in a position to handle a vast 
amount of ore next season. 

The Diiluth, South Shore & Atlantic 
IS repairing its docko at Marquette. A 
portion of the ore dock at St. Ignace is 
being taken down and the timliers will 
be used to ext(>nd one of the docks at 
Marquette. St. Ignace never cut much 
of a figure as an ore shipping port, and 
having need of more dock ro<jm at Mar- 
quette. The company decided to curtail 
the dock at St. Ignace. The road is 
going to cut a wider swath this year in 
the matter of ore shipments than ever 
before. General Manager Fitch has 
gathered around him men who under- 
stand every phase of the ore trade and 
tranic, the rolling stock 



.-„v.^v. ...c iriniii niitjii lu motion 
very difficult thing to stop quickly 
hand brakes. The Northwestern is 



THE COm^ENTION. 
An Kxplanation of its Somewhat Ambigu- 
ous Terms of Expression. 

The call for the coming republican 
convention, as published in The Herald 
vesterday. was rather ambiguous, and 
has excited much comment. It wUl how 
ever not differ materially from others 
Said the chairman this morning: "The 
delegates from the various wards will 
meet in secret session during the con- 
vention, and after deciding uix)n a candi- 
date for alderman, the name or names 
will be given to the chairman, who will 
announce the candidate to the conven- 
tion The choice by the delegates is the 
tin:il action, as the c-onvention will not 
imss u^on the action of the delegates. 
iUe convention as a whole, however. wUl 
nominate a candidate for mavor. 



riatM. 

six weeks 



Sieveral New 
Within a month or six weeks several 
additions to Duluth and suburban plata 
wil be put on the market, adding sev- 
eral hundred acres to Duluth 's residence 
lands. Of these the Sixth division to 
VVest Duluth 18 the most important, as 
It will l>e fit for business propertv. Lake- 
wood plat, division No. 2 of Bav View 
Heights, the plat of the Highland Im- 
provement company, the new division at 
Lester Park and the Spirit Lake Land 
company's plat will eoon go on the mar- 



r 



Charged With MisleadiuK Oirl». 

PiTT>.BUK«, Jan.l7.— The entire Heart 
of Gold dramatic company, which has 
been barnstorming in Western Pennsyl- 
vania for some time, was before .Magis- 
trate (Jripp today on the charge of mis- 

... leading yt)ung girls. The complaint 

„ ami dock facili- '*"* ®°^'",*'^ '^>' -J^'in Lippig, whose 15- 

ties have Ijeen increased, and under such ' ^f ^r-old daughter had left Dome. Lizzie 
favorable conditions the South Shore ' ^'^^^ee was held in $000 and Frank Cu 



will surely make an enviable record dur- 
ing the coming season. 



Walker liUine'd Funeral. 
Washingion, Jan. 17.-- Final arrange- 
ments for the funeral of Walker Blaine 
were completed today. There will be no 
services at the house, except a prayer by 
" — Dr. Hamline, and only intimate 



Re 



friends of the family and the President 
and members of his cabinet are expected 
there. Services at the church of the 
Covenant will also be brief and very 
simple. The pall bearers are: Hon. Wm. 
F. Wharton, assistant secretarv of state; 
Judge John Davis, Sevellon A. Brown, 
Mnrcellus Bailey, M. L. Ruth, A. P. 
Jenks, F. B. Loring and William llay- 
wo<k\. 

IVIARRIED ONE GIRL 



TOO MANY. 
Charge of 



HIb llofiy to be Sent Home. 

San Fkancisco, Jan. 17.— The remains 
of Col. James Allison, the Australian 
theatrical king, who died suddenly of 
pneumonia in this city on Monday last, 
have been embalmed and will be for- 
warded to Sydney on the next outgoing 
steamer. At a meeting of Elks and 
members of the theatrical profession to- 
day, appropriate resolutions were adopted 
and a committee appointed to escort the 
casket to the vessel. 



A PARADISE FOR SPORTSMEN. 



f 



Don't forget the number, 



Thousands of lilrd!i and Animals Take 
Kefuge on a Kuilway Kmbaukment. 

Hazleton, Ind., Jan. 17.— White river 
at this point makes a regular horsehoe 
l^nd of some five or six miles, embracing 
several hundred acres of low bottom 
land through which runs the EvansviUe 
& Terre Haute railroad on a high em- 
bankment, this being the only land visi- 
ble for miles. 

During the recent flood it was the 
refuge of myriads of quail, pheasants, 
wild turnoys, squirrels, foxes, deer, rac- 
coons, opossums and rabb^' „ Alto- 
gether over 10,000 of the fow and ani- 
mals mentioned were slain ,t captured 
dead or alive by hunters. Among them 
was a large catamount or wild cat which 
was captured alive after a great fight. 
It nearly ate up half a dozen dogs before 
it wjis overcome. Besides those killed 
by hunters ee eral were killed by the 
cars as the trains went steaming through 
the living mass of fowls and animals on 
this long narrow strip of earth where 
they had taken refuge from the flood. 



Won't Stand England's Klulf. 
Lisbon, June 17.— English residents of 
this city, who have been victims of the 
public animosity occasioned by the atti- 
tude of England toward Portugal, pro- 
pose to appoint a deputation to wait on 
Lord Salisbury to urge that Great 
Britain adopt a more conciliatorv pylicy. 
The feeling toward England 'is very 
bitter. Many English employes of Portu 
guese houses have been discharged. 



Sympathy for I'ortugal. 

Madbid, Jan. 17. — A proposed public 
meeting to be held in this city on Sun- 
day by the republicans for the purpose 
of expressing their sympathy with the 
Portuguese in their dispute.with England 
has been abandoned. The republicans 
decided, however, to visit the Portuguese 
legation and leave their cards as an ex- 
pression of sympathy. 



The Weather. 

Wa.shingson, D. C. Jan. 17.— Forecast 
till 8 a. m., Saturday: For Minnesota, 
light snow, slightly colder except in ex- 
treme northern and extreme southeast- 
ern portions; warmer northerly winds. 
For North and South Dakota: Light, 
local snows; northeasterly winds, be- 
coming variable; slight changes in tem 
perature. 



Walter Uallard In .lull on 
Uiganty. 

Murphysuoro, 111., Jan. 17.— Walter 
Ballard, a bigamist of only '20 summers, 
lies in the Murphysboro jail. Last 
spring he married a girl named Bloom- 
berg, but after four months of wedded 
life left her. Last Saturday, without a 
divorce, he married Miss Agnes Cham- 
berlain. He gave the name William 
Ballard, instead of Walter, to obtain the 
license. The officiating justice sus- 
pected something wrong. It wasdiscov- 
ered that Ballard was already a married 
man. The sheriff started "in pursuit 
and caught the young couple a few miles 
out of town^ Ball ard was placed in jail. 

Hlow to Washington's Luutber Uusiness. 

Seattle, Wash., Jan. 17.— The great 
lumber trust of the Pacific coast— the 
Pacific Pine Lumber company of San 
Francisco has just issued an order re- 
quiring all mills controlled by the trust 
to close down and reduce the working 
time to twelve days in each month. 
This will not only work great hardship 
to the 10,000 men deriving support from 
the mills, but will be felt in many other 
branches. The boats also find business 
much depressed. The cause of this lat- 
ter is announced as the great scarcity of 
▼essels for carrying lumber to foreign 
ports. 

Abused a Woman. 

Eau Claike, Wis., Jan. 17.— John 
Kroeger and his wife, of Ludington 
township, were arrested on a charge of 
felonious assault upon Mrs. John Shad- 
dock, a neighbor, who is soon to become 
a mother. It is alleged that Kroeger 
and his wife, for some fancied injury, 
knocked Mrs. Shaddock down in the 
road; that they stamped on her and 
pounded her badly; that Kroeger stabted 
her with a knife, the point of which 
broke off in her body, and then gashed 
her on the breast. Mrs. Shaddock's in 
juries are serious. 



The Warm Weather Has Its EflectM on the 
General Fish Market. 

Baltimore. June 17.- Among the 
•jueer antics of the winter is its extra- 
ordinary effects produced on the fish 
business. Fish dealers said today that 
the weather has pushed the litil'. season 
ahead of time just about si.\ weeks. 

"We do not look into the air," said he 
"for Hying birds to tell us that summer 
18 coming, but we look to the water for 
the first shadow of warm weather as a 
harbinger of summer. Fish we are 
already handling are spots, Spanish 
mackeral and trout. This month we 
have had trout that were caught in the 
Rappahannock river. They usually come 
about .Vpril. 

Yesterday we got shad from Chesa- 
peake bay that were at least six weeks 
ahead of time. We got some from North 
Carolina that should, in the regular 
course of things, have come next month; 
and since last Friday we have had .TOOO 
shad from Florida. At this time of year 
we ought to be selling lake fish from the 
West, but we are not, as others are tak- 
ing their place." 



He Oefamed ratll. 

Citv of Mexico, Jan. 17.- The editor 
of the newspaper FA Progreso has been 
sent to jail for defaming Adelina Patti. 



Children's Garments 

At auction in the St. Louis old dining 
room. Sales from li to C p. m. and V to 9 
p. m. 



m- 

mings in 6KXX). The cases of Kittie 
Dardine, "leading lady," James liobin- 
son, "Irish comedian," and John Mc- 
tadden, "heavy man" were held under 
advisement. 



l>o Vou Want Cloaks. 

Big auction sale at St. Ljuis' old din- 
ingroom, commencing Saturday at 2 to 
G p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 

block. 



Large aod Stvlish Stock 



-OF- 



CLOAKS 



SECU RED C LUES. 
l>etectives .Secure Clues That may Lead to 
I>etectlon of a Murder. 
Ashland, Jan. 17.— Detectives have se- 
cured clues by which they may clear up 
a murder mystery. Several years ago 
the body of a jeweler named W^ells, who 
came from CIrand Rapids, Mich., was 
discovered in a barn with a bullet hole 
through his head. The man who was 
suspected of murdering him has left the 
city, but another suspect is now supposed 
to be in this vicinity. The wife of the 
deceased lives with her parents at Erie. 
Pa. Wells' etfects were returned to her, 
but a diamond pin is missing, and by 
tracing that the detectives have hopes 
of securing their man. Relatives of the 
murdered man appear determined to 
find the real culprits and before long 
something may be done in bringing the 
guilty ones to justice. 



-AND- 



;- C 




Gafinents -:- 



TO BE SOLD AT 



AUCTION ! 



A BAD BOSTO N FIRE, 

A Big Wholesale sli.,,- und Leather House 

Destroyed This Morning. 

Boston, Jan. 17.— A fire started about 
8:30 this morning in the building, No. 
i:J8 Summer street, in the shoe and 
leather district, occupied by Wm. Claflin, 
Coburn & Co. Two alarms have been 
sounded. The loss will be heavy. 

The fire, which is believed to have 
started on the lower fioor of Clafiin, 
Coburn & Cfj.'s building spread with re- 
markable rapidity to the upper stories. 
The building is of stone, four stories 
high. It is thought that the fire will be 
confined to the building in which it 
started. 

An estimate of the loss places it be- 
tween 8150,000 and 8200,000. The loss 
on the Clafiin building alone is about 
$100,000. 



IN THE OLD DININGROOM, 



Hotel St Louis 



COMMENCING 



28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



Chance for Kdgar Saltur. 
^L^RION. Ind.. Jan. 17.— Paul Sellers 
was arrested today charged with the 
abduction of his sister-in-law, Miaa 
Celina Lainbriotte, to Dunkirk, where 
he passed her off as his wife. The girl 
was recovered and restored to her 
parents. Sellers is in jail. The pri.soner 
has a wife and two children at New 
Albany, Ind. 



I 



LOUIS 



LENA. 



She Killed Three. 

Faribault, Minn., Jan. 17.— Cannon 
lake, about five miles from here, was the 
scene of a horrible quadruple murder 
and suicide today. Mrs. McNeal, the 
wife of a prosperous farmer, in a fit of 
despondency, shot her three children, 
aged respectively 4 and 2 years and 3 
weeks, forced another daughter, aged G 
years, to drink carbolic acid, and then 
took a dose herself. She and her daughter 
may recover. Despondency owing to 
recent illness is the cause. She said she 
expected to die and could not bear the 
thought of leaving her children behind. 



The Oldest Member of Commons. 
London, Jan. 17.— Christopher Rice 
Mansell Talbot, liberal member of the 
house of Commons for Glamorganshire, 
is dead. In point of service Mr. Talbot 
was the oldest member of the house of 
commons, having sat for his county un- 
interruptedly for G3 years. 

I'leusing Outlook. 
Winona, Jan. 17.— The lumljermen in 
this vicinity are jubilant over the out- 
l(X)k for 1890. The vast decrease in the 
supply of pine timber in Northern Min- 
nesota and W^isconsin is being felt, and 
the operators here say they are advising 
their foremen to be very saving this 
sea9<jn. The cut commenced five weeks 
ago, and with eight weeks more cutting 
enough logs will be banked for the 
season of 1890. 



Butter! 

Choice creamery 
Clark &, MeU. 



Butter! 

and dairy 



butter at 



Deaths in Mexico. 
_CiTY OP Mexico, Via Galveston, Jan. 
17.— Influenza is spreading in Mexico. 
Several deaths from the disease are re- 
ported to have occurred at Villa Lobas. 

The first bill passed by the South Da- 
kota legislature to become a law was 
signed by the governor. It provides for 
the appointment of a commission to 
finally settle the accounts between 
North and South Dakota. 



Children's Garments 
At auction in the St. Louis old dining- 
room. Sale from 2 to 6 p. m. and 7 to 9 
p. m. 



Frank Benson .\rrested. 

Ashland, Wis., Jan. 17.— Frank Ben- 
son, alias Frank Smithing, was arrested 
here today on an order from the chief of 
police at Hurley, as he was alx)ut to 
take the train for St Paul. It is said 
that he is implicated in a sensational 
robberj and that a warrant is also out 
for him at Iron wood, Mich. 

Died in a Sneezing Fit. 

Cincinnati, .Ian. 17.— Ljite last night 
Wm. Gerling, a mulatto aged 32, died 
in fit of sneezing. He had been suffering 
from influenza only during the evening, 
and about 11 o'clock was attacked with 
sneezing, and died before relief could be 
obtained. 

BOGU S BU TTER. 

Over a Ton of Ole<>ni.irt;arine Confiscated 
Here Yesterday. 

-Xssistant State Dairy Commissioner 
Laurence confiscated over a ton of oleo- 
margerine in Duluth yesterday. He 
visited the Armour company's ware- 
house and fnspected the contents and 
found 1000 pounds of the butter, which 
was promptly taken and shipped down 
to St. Paul. 

The commissioner made a tour north 
of the city early in the week.and at Two 
Harlx>r8 another lot, in the jxwsession of 
Bradley & Hanford, was confiscated. At 
Tower quite a ijuantitv was found in the 
camps of Saunders & Bailey. This was 
also taken, and the whole aggregates 2500 
pounda It is put up in tubs and lolls 
in exact imitation of dairy butter. The 
tubs were labeled "oleomargarine," in 
compliance with the old law, which al- 
lowed its sale in the state. There is no 
doubt that oleomargarine is a great deal 
better for eating, purer, cleaner and more 
wholesome than a good deal of the regu- 
lation butter, but the state law doee not 
allow its sale. 



To Help the Farmer. 

Llncoln, Neb., June 17.— Governor 
Taylor has addressed an open letter to 
the general managers of the Burlington, 
Northwestern, Missouri Pacific, Union 
Pacific, liock Island and Omaha rail- 
roads, urging them to put into effect a 
rate on corn at least five cents per 100 
lower than that now in force. 



SATURDAY, JAN. 18, 



At 2 to 6 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M. 



h 



Advaueemeut of .Surgical Skill. 

Chicaoo, Jan. 17.— A strange oper- 
ation was performed at the Presbyterian 
hospital on a six-year old liockford boy. 
He was paralyzed Christmas so he could 
not move a muscle. His spinal column 
was laid bare and a clot of blood 
moved, and it is said he will get well 



re- 



TELEGRAPH BRIEFS. 



Mayor Fitlerof]'liiladelphia,has signed 
the ordinance grunting the right to the 
Philadelphia & Rt>ading Railroad com- 
pany to construct an elevated railroad 
through the city. 

The journeymen stone cutters of Buf- 
falo have taken the initiative on the 
eight hour movement here, by making a 
demand ujion the employers that short 
days shall go into effect July 1. All the 
building trades are expected to follow 
suit. The employing stone cutters are 
in favor of granting the demand. 

In the course of his speech before 
parliament, the governor-general of 
Canada said: "In consequence of the 
repeated seizures by the cruisers of the 
United States navy of Canadian vessels, 
my goveinment has strongly represented 
the necessity of protecting our shipping 
while engaged in their lawful calling as 
well of guarding against the assumption 
by any nation of exclusive proprietary 
rights. 

The Union hotel at Prescott was 
burned to the ground. Ihe inmates 
being asleep, the fire was under great 
headway before it was discovered. It 
started under the kitchen floor in some 
sawdust, which made a dense smoke and 
nearly suffocated the guests. 

Four men were killed and several 
badly wounded by the premature explo- 
sion of a blast near Johnson City, Tenne- 
see. 



J. M. BECKMAN 



I 



AUCTIONEER. 



F^EAL ESTATE 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

3 Lots in Endion, $4500. 

2 Lots in Highland Park, S2500. 
20 Acres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lots adjoining London, cheap. 



r 



A few of the choicest lots inSMurray & Howe's Addition for 
saUi on easy terms. 

Twenty acres on the hill at a great bargain. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Rooin 9, Metropolitan Block. 







r*- 




t 



i; 



4*" 



i 



i^-^* 





DUL.TJTH I^V^EKIKG HEBALD: JA:NTJARY 17, 1890. 



EVEN^IN^a HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD, PublKher. 



PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Dallv, by mail, per year *I"55 

Dally, by mall, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mall, per one month 'o 

IS TH« CITT. 

Dally, by carrier, per week '8 



Entered at the postofflce at Duluth, MlQO., as 

•econd-oloAS mall matter. 



0r~The Washington oflBce of The Herald U 
at \1ii4 New Vork avi-nue. N. W.. where the 
paper is kopt on ale and where The Herald 
correstKiiiiieut will welcome visitors 
Northwest. 



from the 



the 

is 



Call for Kepubllran Caucus. 

All lejrallv nualifl d voters who intend to 
Tote for the repuMieuu candidates for the 
variKUS oOiees to l>e Ulle<l in llie eity of Duluth 
on IVbruHiN 4. ISlHi. at the rejrulur ulty elec- 
tion, ure hei-el'y notined tbdt caucuses wil, be 
held between the hours of 5 and."* p.m., on 
January 'U. l>w. for the purpose of electlnsr 
deleyiiic s lo the city repuUiica i convention 

Till pl.-ice-i for holiliiiR caucuses and 
nuiulHT of delcjfutes to which each precinct 
entitled have l)eeu e^lablished as follow: 

First ward- A>a l>aley 8 lumber office, 4SJ 
Lake avenue south. •• 

tifc-oiid ward— James McBeth's store. East 
Superior street. . ., ,, 

Third ward. First Precinct— Store building. 
First avenue east and First street. 

Second precinct— ;Ol East Superior street. 

ThinI precinct- Kast Knd livery barn. 

Fourth ward, blrit precinct— 113 West First 
street. 

ficcond precinct— 319 West Sui>erior street. 

Third precinct- Tul West Superior stre»H. 

Fifih ward. First precinct— IBUS West Su- 
perior street. 

Second pi- -r'o Garfield avenue. 

Third pi. : W.-.-t .Micliitra" street. 

Sixihwji. > .-st -Mich itrau street. 

The basis ot repre»eiilatiou has been ILved tit 
one delcKate to each lit' votes or maj r Irac- 
tlon tlicre<>f casi tor the republican candidate 
at the last pr<sidcuti:il e.ection. and one dele- 
gate at larg-e for eaih precinct. 

Jiach ward is entitle*! to the following- repre- 
sentation: First ward. 4 delegates; Second 
ward, a deiegites: Third ward. Fii>t precinct 
4delegal s: Sei-oud prvcint, ;! delegates: Third 
precinct. .'J delegat.s: Fourth ward. First pre- 
cinct, .J dc.cg.ites: Second precinct. 4 delegates; 
Thinl prcciijct. J delegate?; Filth ward, First 
precinct. :> delegates; Second precinct, 4 dele- 
gates. Third precinct, a delegates: Stith wanl. 
o delegates. 

James Dixgwalx., 

JOH.V H. La\ AVLE. 

p. S. Anxekk. 

Chakles DL'SCAN, 

H. S. Lord. 
S. M. Lester, 
City Kepubllcan Com. 



the call it might be inferred that the 
body of delegates would select the 
candidates for aldermen as well as mayor, 
but the chairman of the city committee 
explains that the chosen delegates of 
each ward will put in nomination the 
candidate for alderman from each ward, 
and that the ward selection thus made 
will be final and accepted as such by the 
convention without question. This is as 
it should be. but it is well to have such 
points definitely stated in advance of any 
possible question. 



LITTLE CHUNKS OF NEWS. 



The Montreal Witness observes that 
"the census of the United States, from 
being a simple numbering of the people 
for e.ectoral and other political purposes, 
has become a decennial analysis of the 
elements and forces of the nation. In 
some important respects, however, it 
fails to accomplish what it aims 
at. For instance, it furnishes 
no dat a from which the increase of 
different races can be computed, a ques- 
tion, which, in its bearinj; on the future, 
is one of immense interest and import- 
ance." This may be so in Canada where 
the present constitutional provisions 
seem artfully calculated to keep race 
lines closely drawn and distinct, but it 
is not so vital a question here where the 
blending of race lines towartl an unified 
American type is remarkable and rapid. 
In the South alone is the race problem 
difficult of solution. 



Call for City Republican Convention. 

All duly elected delcfe'-aics to the city repub- 
lican convention will meet in the council room 
at the city hu 1. iniluth. Minnesota, ou Jan. Si. 
!?»'. ai ■-' p. m . for the purpose? of placing in 
uoiuin.tlion rcpubiican candidates for the var- 
ious otHces as tullows: Ma>or; two aldermen. 
First ward; one alderman. Second ward ; one 
alderman. I'hird ward; one alderman. Fourth 
ward: one alderman. Filth ward; one alder- 
mao, SLxih ward. 

M. O. Hall. Chairman Com. 



A SIGNAL MISTAKE. 

The nomination of John M. Clark for 
collector of customs at Chicago is a 
signal mistake of the President, from the 
republican party standpoint. It is cer- 
tainly surprising that a man so sagacious 
and prudent as Mr. Harrison has re- 
peatedly shown himself to be, should 
have gone deliberately astray from the 
common sense course in this instance. 
We believe that the President should 
always bear in mind that he is the chief 
executive of the country antl not the 
chosen representative of a political part 
of it merely, but that is no reason why 
he should entirely ignore the fact that 
he is inevitably looked to as the leader 
of his party and necessarily concerned in 
the shaping of its policy and the legiti- 
mate strengthening of its organization. 

Such an act as the nomination of 
Clark in open and apparently causeless 
contempt of the representative political 
sentiment of Illinois necessarily leads to 
disaffection, dissatisfaction and disor- 
ganization. If there is any sound reason 
for such wilful disregard of precedent, 
courtesy and party unity it certainly 
should be stated forthwith. Otherwise 
President Harrison must be charged 
with a wilful and arrogant assertion of 
unwarrantable contempt for the recom- 
mendations of the authorized spokes- 
men for his party in Illinois. There is 
no fault to find with the selection of Mr. 
Clark personally, but grave complaint is 
justly made of the manner of the selec- 
tion and with the rejection of the recog- 
nized party candidate. 

It is no light thing to provoke the fol- 
lowing bitter comment of Senator Far- 
well: "This nomination was sent to the 
senate without consultation with any of 
the members or either of the senators 
from Illinois and against their known 
wishes. Xor was Mr. Clark a candidate 
for the appointment. The delegation 
was in entire accord in supporting Camp- 
bell. They knew of no opposition to him 
froir anyone authorized to speak for the 
republicans of Illinois, and they have 
never heard of any charges against him 
or that his character or fitness was ever 
questioned by anyone. I have talked 
with many senators on the subject, and 
©verjone of them declares it to be a 
great outrage upon the senators and the 
repu blicans of the state. I regard it as 
a personal blow at me without cause 
or excuse and entirely unesplainable. 
If there had been a division of 
opinion in the delegation or a contest 
over the office, if any senator or member 
had objected to Mr. Campbell or in- 
dorsed Mr. Clark, it would be different; 
but Campbell not only was entitled to 
the office, but was indorsed by everj- 
body. There was never a case like it." 

No one will be more ready than The 
Herald Uj assert and justify indejiend- 
enc© of thought and action when there 
is sound ground for it. It is tied to no 
man's kite and no party's kite. But it 
is one of the vainest political errors for 
any accredited party representative to 
cut himself away from support which 
he should rely on for the empty 
gratification of standing alone on a 
pedestal of his own conceit. Ex-Presi- 
dent Cleveland at times acted in office 
as if he could do without friends and did 
not care whether he retained them or 
not, and both his administration and his 
party, not to speak of his own political 
future, suffered sorely from this mis- 
take. We sincerely trust, for the sake 
of the respect we have for President 
Harrison and our regard for the future 
of the republican party, that he will not 
fall into the same pit. No President can 
wisely or fairly forget his party or his 
friends. 

Some curious question has been called 
out by the published announce- 
ment of the chairman of the 
city republican committee that all 
duly elected delegates to the city 
convention will meet on the 2.5th of the 
month for the purpose of placing in 
Domination the republican candidates 
for the various offices. On the faoe of 



The house committee on rules has 
split on the question whether the World's 
fair shall be reported to the house by a 
sj^cial (XJmmittee or one of the regular 
house committees. The majority will 
report in favor of a special committee 
and the minority in favor of reference to 
the committee on foreign affairs, with 
instruction to report on these three 
salient points: 

1, Whether there shall be a World's fair. 

2 Whether such fair shall be held east or 
west of the Alleghany mountains. 

3. How the location of the fair shall be deter- 
mined. 

For the sake of the success of the fair, 
if decided upon, and the ending of this 
dragging question, we hope it will be 
brought to a head as soon as 
possible. The artful Cannon. 

Springer and Butterworth who present 
the minority report have framed point 
number two shrewdly to divide the 
countrj- on the Alleghany line if possi- 
ble, relying on the pull of Chicago as 
soon as the site is put west of the line 
by the weight of the body of the coun 
trj-. This and other points of vantage 
will be sharply contested, but the coun- 
try at large is getting weary of the 
scheming and ciphering for points, and 
calling for the main question. Where 
shall the World's fair be held and when? 



Capt. E. S. Smith: Yes, that's a fact 
about catching of whitefish that have 
evidently been planted here. I have 
had a better catch this fall and winter 
than for several years and, aa The Her- 
ald said, the fish were such that we 
knew they were planted, 1 l«ok for great 
increase in the first supply soon. 

Fish Commissioner Sweeney: We 
are going to do big work at the hatchery 
this year. It was expected to put a crew 
of expert fishermen over on the south 
shore spawning beds this fall to fish for 
eggs alone, but the Lake Erie 
fgH gatherers had sach luck that 
the project was abandoned. Next fall 
we thall probably do it, and collect a 
large share of our eggs ourselves. The 
fishermen go to the spawning beds and 
net both male and female fish, from the 
females they strip the eggs and mix them 
in buckets with the milt. It doesn't 
take but a few hours to see the differ- 
ence if the eggs are impregnated, and it 
doesn't take very long, with good luck, 
to get 100,aXt.0(X) whitefish eggs. 

A Marquette man: I understand that 
the Carp furnace, which is to be started 
up soon and of which Mr. Burt will be 
manager, has had an offer for its entire 
product of pig iron for a year at $"Jo a 
ton. The iron will cost at the furnace 
about 815. Evidently these people be- 
lieve that pig is to be worth something, 
or they wouldn't offer such a price for a 
year's product. The Carp will turn out 
thirty-rive to forty tons daily. 

A. S. Chase: The policy of the Duluth 
Street Railway company is to give its 
patrons the best service. Over SIOO.OOO 
will be expended for this purpose in 
IStW. 

M. S. Burrows: Business is good with 
us this week. A good many firms are 
complaining about sales, but cold 
weather is helping us out, and then you 
know we advertise a good deal. There 
is a good improvement in our sales this 
month over a year ago. We are increas- 
ing our business all the time. 

AMONQ STATE PAPERS. 



STATE NEWS. 



SEEN AND HcARD. 



"We don't enjoy ourselvco half so much." 
said a fine old lady, who has lived here since 
X). as when there were only ten families. In- 
cluding ourselves, in Duluth. There was us, 
Sid Luce's folks, Luke Marvin and bis family, 
the Wakelin'?, J. B. Culver's people. Rider's, 
Waterman Green and Henry liurke'g families 
Some of them lived on Minnesota Point; our 
house was on a little clearing not far up the 
bill, and when we visited back and forth, the 
ladles used to ride horseback. There was no 
road, only a trail winding through the woods 
down to the Point. We never paid any atten- 
tion to the weather; no matter how hard It 
stormed, we visited just when we felt like il 
But it.'s ail changed now. Most of them are 
dead and gone. We visit but little with the 
people now," and the old lady sigliedas though 
she longed for the return of the good old 

primitive times. 

* * m 

Anyone would not usually suppose that 
Washington society was above all else intel- 
lectual. As the center of governmcut and the 
place of the statesman and diplomat. Washing- 
ion social life should be one of solous, scien- 
tific gatherings, polities, social clubs, etc., etc.. 
etc. But. alas! while such things, of course, 
are to be found, in the main its society is the 
most Hippant and butterflyisb in America. It 
is a constant scramble for place and position. 
For the past ten years there has been a big 
ttghl as to whom should be the second, third 
and fourth ladies in the land; and the ques- 
tion isn't decided yet. There's more show at 
Washington than in any other city. 

* * * 

You meet all kinds of women in this society, 
from the cheap adventuress to the belle whose 
reign is based on ancestry, intellectuality and 
beauty. Some of the congressional "rackets" 
would make material for a book fully as sala- 
cious lu its features as any of the tales of 
European devilment. If you have a little 
money, are clever in social ways, have an 
oHicial aOquaintauee. can gossip and talk of 
other people, you are tltted to be a Washington 
resident. ^ 

THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



Mankato Free Press: A Milwaukee 
t«Jeeram says that an English syndicate 
is after the cement mills of the country, 
and if such is the truth doubtless Man- 
kato will receive a visit from them. The 
purchase of all the cement factories of 
the country and their operation in such 
a way as to make some money might not 
be an entire evil. 

Red Wing Republican: The press and 
people of St. Cloud were favorable to the 
location of the state reformatory there. 
The situation was selected by a commis- 
sion that chose a point where convict 
labor might be employed with the least 
interference with the work of honest 
people. St. Cloud was chosen. News- 
papers and citizens presented so strongly 
its advantages as the site of abundant 
granite quarries that the commission set 
the prison down on the granite ground. 
It would have looked better if the objec- 
tions to the state going into granite 
working had been made before the state 
was invited to come there expressly to go 
into business. 

St. Cloud Times: Senators Davis and 
Washbprn have had a "talk;" J. C. Don- 
nahower of St. Pet^r. has been agreed 
on for marshal, and Marcus Johnson for 
collector. 

The Little Falls Transcript gets out a 
neat issue, setting forth attractively the 
virtues of the town and its advantages. 
From the Transcript The Herald would 
presume Little Falls and Morrison 
county to 1x5 in a most prosperous con- 
dition. 



A lamp exploded in one of the rooms 
of Albert Lea college last night, and but 
for the timely use of a fire extinguisher 
in the hands of Miss Bessie Underwood, 
one of the students, a large blaze would 
have resulted. .\s it was only a slight 
injury resulted. 

The Alexandria High school has GOO 
scholars enrolled. 

Governor Merriam yesterday appointed 
G. A. Carlson of Red Wing, member of 
the state board of equalization for the 
First district. 

Morrison county will have a new court 
house located at Little Falls, and cost 
ing 840,000. 

The Farmers Mutual Insurance com- 
pany of Bath, elected the following ofli- 
cers at its late annual meeting: Presi- 
dent, H. P. Jehnsen; secretary, Soron 
Jacobson ; treasurer, C. F. Pederson. The 
total:exp©oses were .^±!2,260. There are 
21.1 (iblicies in force. 

Senator Davis present^ed a petition 
from citizens of Faril>ault, asking that 
material for shipbuilding be admitted to 
this country free of duty. 

Ah Her is Talked. 

He — Now that you have made me 
the happiest of mortals, can I kiss you"? 
She (Boston) -Never having had any 
personal experience of your osculatory 
abilities, Mr. Gesner. I do not know if 
you can, but you may. 

I>rtnk It fliiuself. 

Wahpetpn Gazette: With §-2700 worth 
of liquor on h.ind, under a constitution 
that prohibits selling or giving it away, 
what is the owner to do with it? Will 
some mathematician furnish an answer 
that will be acceptable all around? 

An Agtlti AUlker. 

Suburban Resident — Yes, I want a 
useful man about my country place. 
Can you milk'r Applicant— Vis, sor. 
Resident — Which side of the cow do you 
sit on when milking? Applicant— Wull, 
sor, oi niver milked but wan cow. an" 
she was a kicker, sor; an', bedad, a good 
dale av the time oi was on both soiils av 
her, sor. 

Th« Wisather Bulletin. 

Meteorological report received at 



Minn.. 8 a m. Jan Hi. I.S.U. 



Duluth 



places. 



Duluth 

Pt. Arthur. 
Winnipeg . . 
St. Vin-ent 
Q'Appolle.. 
Asslnib'ne . 

Helena 

Huron. Dak 
St. Paul . .. 
La Crosse. . . 
UlsTnarck... 
Moorhead .. 



Bar 


Ther. 


Wind 


;i0.4« 


— 2 


NW 


.•J.>..>4|— is 


S 


::t.i.T0|-36 


sw 


:iu.(M 


-34 


w 


m'M 


-is 


NW 


:i^l.40-l« 


N 


:iu.li» i 


N 


;ki 40 6 


Culm 


■iiiM —14 


E 


.10.54 


-10 


N 



Kain. Weather 



.03 



'Snow 
iP't Cloudv 

... I P't Cloudy 
. . Cloudless 



.OS 



T. 

.10 

T. 



Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Snow 

Snow 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 



T In rain cohiraa indicates trace. One (1) 
inch of rain or melted snow equals ten (10) In- 
ches of snowfall. .Minus (—) in temperature 
column indicates below zero. 

A' U. Fallon. 

Serireant Signal Corp< 



6 PER CENT! 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



The first gun of the municipal contest wU] 
be fired by the labor party tonight. There 
will be a meeting in the Knights of Pythias 
hall In the Hunter building at h 
o'clock under the auspices of the 
labor party. This meeting Is called 
for the purpose of discussing the con- 
tract system. There will be several speakers 
who will be announced from the platform and 
address the meeting as above indicated. Tlie 
disadvantages of the franchises given by the 
city to the corporations will also be discussed. 
Tlie meeting is to l»e a general one. The labor 
element bus a few things to ask for in the 
coming election, which will be presented to" 
night. Political issues as applied to the Ialx)r- 
Ing classes will be also a theme of discussion. 

* * Hf 

Since an article in The Herald yesterday 
mentioning the probability of the aldermauic 
candidacy Of D. J. Sinclair, 1 understand 
that Mr. Sinclair is in fact a can- 
didate, and an avowed one. He 
has a .strong following in the Second ward and 
appears to be prettv sure of a nomination, pro- 
vided the nominations are made by ward dele- 
gates and not in open convention as would ap- 
pear to be the expectation of tlie commi ttec by 
their call. 

* * :» 

There is a goo<l deal of quiet talk about 
George liupley for mayor, and it is likely that 
if he would allow the use of bis name he would 
unqufstiotiably be a creditable nominee. 
But the talk for the past week has been de- 
cidedly Sutphiny. and while the present mayor 
has been disinclined to run again, the pressure 
brrjugbt to bear u[X)n him may change his 
mind. If he d(jfs. a gooil muiiy calculations 
will be knocked out of shape. 

* « * 
Interest in government appointments Is set- 
tled in the land office. 8. L. Frazer, of Os 
bourne & Frazer is wanted by Commis.iioner 
Grofr as the receiver, but the latest movement 
Is a petition endorsing Harry Armstrong, at 
present alderman from the Fifth ward. Those 
behind Armstrong claim to have been re- 
queited by the powers that be to "send us 
some names." It is hardly probable that Reg- 
ister Colvllle will go soon but bis successor Is 
likely to be Alex Frazer or Frank Burke. If 
Col. Colvllle Is removed at tbeezplration of bis 
term, or before, he should be given a place 
where he can servH with ease and where he 
can be sure of iberth. If any man is entitled 
to a mjtt place for life. Col. Colvllle Is that 
man. 



T. W. Caskey, a Southern orator, de 
clares that "Jefferson Davis was the 
greatest man that has lived since the 
days of Jesus Christ." It is not our 
purpose to belittle Mr. Davis, but we 
would remind Mr. Caskey that George 
Francis Train arrogates this claim ex- 
clusively to himself. 

A gentleman who recently returned 
from Europe says that James Gordon 
Bennett's hair is now gray and that he 
is one of the most distinguished-looking 
men in Paris. Mr. Bennett is turning 
his attention to yachting again, and 
some results of importance to the world 
of sport are expected. 

Mrs. Esther Greeley Cleveland, a sis- 
ter of Horace Greeley, died from pneu 
monia on Friday night at the Coleman 
house. New York, where she had lived 
for many years. She had been ill for 
only four days with the disease which 
has proved fatal to so many people dur- 
ing the last month. 

Lord Hartington's death just now 
would be likely to precipitate a general 
election, as it is likely that most of his 
personal followers would return to their 
allegiance to Gladstone. 

John G. Whittier has instructed his 
barber to destroy all the hair which he 
cuts from the poet's head, so that it 
may not fall into the hands of the relic 
hunters. 

Mrs. James Brown Potter has sailed 
for .\ustralia. The antipodean stage 
had to be elevated, and Mrs. J. B. P. 
feels that she can safely undertake the 
contract. 

Mr. Joseph Plankinton, one of the 
oldest members of the Philadelphia bar, 
died in that city on Saturday. He cele- 
brated his 90th birthday on Christmas 
last. 

As Tilings Go in Life. 

McFingle — Do you know that seedy- 
looking individual over there? Mc- 
Fangle— He's the inventor of one of the 
most wonderful and useful engines in 
the world. McFingle — Indeed! And 
who is that handsomdly-dre-sed, pros- 
perous-looking man to whom he is talk- 
ing"/ McFangle — Oh, he invented an oil 
can to use on the engine invented by 
the other. 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Unimproved Pfopertj. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTQAQE8 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



CLAi;U[ & PRIU, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 




*^a**^^**^**— **<a,i*,>*^— >„^**M4* 



The Importance of puilfying the blood ran- 
not be overestimated, for without pure 
blood you cannot enjoy good health. 

At this season nctrlf every one needs a 
good medicine to piirifj-, vitalize, and enrich 
the blood, and Hood's Sarsaparilla is worthy 
your confidence. It iit peculiar in th.at It 
strengthens and builds t.p the sy.steni, creates 
an appetite, and tunes the digestion, while 
it eradicates disease. Give it a trial. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla is sold by all druggists. 
Prepared by C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

100 Doses One Dollar 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



—or— 



BARGAINS 



OPVERED BV 



C. E. RICHARDSON, 



Acreage on the hill, Just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half Interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior I 60 

1 Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best bargain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An Investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E. RICHARDSON, 

376 West Superior Street. 



COFFIN i WAHNFe, 

30 FAHGySSON «L"X!K. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 6. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 



W, C, SHEIIWOOO k CO,. 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

H.WE GENUINE B.A.l<OAINd IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlSti parts of the city 



ACRE PROPERTY 



and 
ADJOINING. 



All we ask Is for i : rtieBtoexamlncourllst and 

compare them f 1th other prices l>efore 

buyinjir. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



Humphreys' 

Da. HcMPHRKva' .■5i"E(i>i(„-i are sclent lllrallv and 
carefully prepared presenplloiis ; used forniany 
Tears lu private riracllfo with success.and forover 
thirty years used by the pt><>ple. Every slnKle Spe- 
ciac^is a Mpecia 1 cure for the dlfeanf nunied. 

These .siH-elfles cure witijut druKKlng. purg- 
ing or reducing the s.vstera, and are in fiiot aud 
deed the sovereign remediesoftheWorld, 



UST OF PRINCIPAL SOS. CTHE-O. 
1 Fevers, (niiKestlon, lutlamraatlnn. 
rn]<4, Wi.rm Fever, Worm I'oiii' . 
rjitiK Colle.cneethliiKof infaiita 
4 Diarrnea, of C'lilUlreu or Adults ... 
!i Ovseutery. Orlijlug, HIllous folic... 
U ( holcra MorbuH. VoniUlug 



i U orni 
3 Crjina 



7 Coiinh.t, <'olii, brouchltl*.. 
h Neuralitia, Td 



Ik! a, Toolhaehe, Kaceache 

!l lleadni'heN, Sl.-klleailnclie, Vertigo 

10 I>J«lM-pNin, Bilious Stoiiineh 

11 SuppreHHcd or Painful i'erlods. 

I'i \\uiteH< tooProfu.se Periods 

13 Croup. Cough, Dlftlcult lireathlng... 
11 Salt ttbeum. Kryhlpelns, Eruptloua. 

1-5 Khrnmuti-^m, Hheaniatio PoIdfi 

m KeviT.niul .\ eae. <hlll.«, Malarlu 

17 IMIes, """'1 or r.lecding 

19 rmnrrh, lutluenza. Cold Inthe Head 
Mit Whuopinic ('ouBh, "'olent Coughs. 
'it <.i-nerrii Itehilily, rhyslcal Weakness 

'i7 Kiduey DiNea-iC ."50 

US NervuMs Debility 1.00 

eO I rinary Wrakneis. Wetting Bed. .5M 
4 I)i>ieaciesof IhcUcart.PalplUUonl.OO 

Sold hy Druggists, or sent postpaid on receipt 
©f price. l)u. HiMPHREYs' Mamai.. (144 pages) 
rlcnly hound in cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Bumpfareyii'nedicinero.li'if Fulton St. N Y. 

SPECIFICS. 



PKICEli. 

.'ir, 

.'2,-i 

'M 

.'i:i 

.-a 
.•2-i 
.i.-i 

:i 

.'to 



Grand .Skatlni; Tournament. 

A grand skating tournament will take 
place Saturday evening, Jan. 18, at the 
West End Parlor Skating rink, Twenty- 
tirst avenue west and Superior street, 
between twelve young ladies. \ tine 
gold medal will be awarded to the win- 
ner. Four competent judges will be on 
hand to award the prize. Walkers Mili- 
tary band will be on hand. Everybody 
should try and attend as it will be the 
finest match ever seen in Duluth. Ad- 
mission, gents, ■.i'jc; ladies, 15c; children. 
10c. The match will take place at 9 
o'clock sharp. Medal can be seen at 
rink. T. M. Eiticso.N, Prop. 

Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. 

I>oes Kxperieiice Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown by the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 

The head of the firm of C. I, Hood & 
Co. IS a thoroughly comi)etent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
mem l>er of the Massachusetts and Am 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern research 
ill medical science has developed, com- 
bined with long experience, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
I itB great curative value. 



CHRIST IAN SC IENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY ANO READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table Is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building Free of charge. 



Mortgage Sale. 



DEFAULT HAVING HEEN MADE IN THE 
payment of the sum of three hundn>d 
fifteen Wl-lUl dollars (Kll.jfiO). prlnelpal and 
inten-st, which Is eluiuicd to be due ut the date 
of this notico upon a certain morttfiijrc, duly 
exiciilcd and delivered by FrancL-< X. I'arent 
ami Mary K. Parent, hjs vifo, to Honry F. 
Ihivls. l)earintr dute the seventh day of .June. 
A. U. If^Ht, and duly recorded in the ollicc of 
ftie register of deeds in iind tor the coniitv of 
St. lyouis, and stntc of Mlnncw)Ui, on 'the 
elKhth day of June A. I). 1M», at « o'elwk and 
10 minutes, .\. M.. In Hook 41 of Mortisr.iKes. on 
pajre •)". and no action or prtK-eiHiing' nt l:iw 
or otherwise haviiiK been instituted to recover 
the debt secured bj said Mortgage, or any part 
thereof: 

Now therefore, notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of n power of sale contained In said 
ruortgage, and pursuant to the statute In such 
case made and provided, the said Mortgage 
will Im,' foreclosed, and the premises described 
in and i.-overed by said mortgage, viz: 

lAjts tlir«3<» i:iiand four (4i, of section eighteen 
(IS), and lot lit), of section nineteen (I!);, all 
in town.shlp sixty-three (tJ3», north of range 
twelve (I2i, west of the 4th principal meridhui 
In St. Louis county, and state of Minne- 
sota, with the hercflitaments and appur- 
tenances, will be sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for ca-h, to pav said 
debt and interest, and tin- taxes. If" any, 
on sulil premlsei,, and twenty-llvo dollars 
attorni-y's fee. as stipulated in and by 
said mortgage in case of foroclosuro, and the 
disburs4!ment8 allowed by law; whh^h sale will 
l>e made bv the sheriff of said St. Ijouls 
wjuiity. at the front d(«)rof the Court Hou.se. 
in the city of Duluth in s-'ild county and state. 
on the a>th day of January. A. D. IMxi. ut lo 
o'dwk a. m. of that day, suDject to redemp- 
tion at an) time within one year from the day 
of sale, as provided bv law 

Dated December 13ih, A. D. ItWO. 

Hbnrv F Davis, 

D XT «. Mortgagee. 

R. N. Marble, 

Attorney. 
Dec, 14-21-28. Jau. 4-11-1^85. 



J. D. & R. C. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B," 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



K. C. GKIDLEY. J. C. MISHLKK 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

U(>om 2n, Exchaige BuUdlng. 

List your property witli us at 'That It Is worth 
and we will sell It.* We invite everybody to 
call In and see us. and solicit c^)rn>spond<?nce 



M 



ONEY TO LOAN IN ALL 
>ums on Duluth Real 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 8 per 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOVt'ARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'^r Block. 



GREAT ENGLISH RSMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 




;h'?!;^ Aguarante* 
voiie disease 
.Mcmorv, Loss 



cure for all ner 
such as Weak 
Brain Power, 



Hysteria, Headache, Pain In the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhoea, Universal I.,assl- 
tudc. Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
t«ncy aud general loss <>f power 
of the Oencriitive Organs: — in 

either sex, caused by indiscre- 

BlfcltTtlfl»Ci H Ti or ovcr-exeitlon.and which 
uTuuiuic:\ lead to Premature T>*4«Ha;K. 
Old Age. insanity and Consump- 
tion. ti.'M or a box or six boxes 
for K.OO. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of, "price. Full partlcalarB 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
ap()lic;illt. We Oai»ruiit«?e .Six 
Knxes .to cur« any case. For 
every l.j.OO order received, we 

send six boxes, with a written^ 

guarantee to refund the ""'""'yuft** T«|i|>», 

If our Spoolflc does liot effect a cure. Addrees 

sllcoiD'iUJtilcatlous to the !»ole manufacturers 

THE MDRKAV >iRDI< INECO. 

KHnsas City. Mo 

.„•;<« «,T ;\<iltit.1> ^.^• M*» 'vVlrth 




$8. CO 
n 



Best Set 
"of Teeth. 



t f or 



Painless Dentist. 



Kt'Om l-T, 4jiti West Superior Street, 
Panruseon Block. - Oiiluth 



ilETOSTElMFIITEIIS 



Hjppy jw m. 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



AllofWhichisWellinlts 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All "Get There" if 

You Try, so You ha i 

Better Try 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



IChlcugo Herald. J 
.Just now is the time when the average man 
Begins to prospectively mentally plan. 
As the annual swearing otf season draws near. 
Of the leal he'll turn over the Ilrst of the year. 
Everything that is wrong from his lifc"he'll 

efface. 
And naught that's unjust in his thoughte have 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
When he says so and so then the business is 

done. 
But in onler to have his new plan broken in. 
He d better not tarry a day to begin. 
And 'tis best he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Whv not employ this year the leaf turned for 

last? 



Sealed proposals will be received until 3 
o'clo<!k p. m , January 3Jth. 1K9U. by E. R. Jeffer- 
son, chairman of conimlitj'e on court house 
and county Jail, for the steam-heating appara- 
tus in the new crounty jail. In accordance with 
plans and speclllcatlons druwn by»). ti.Tra- 
phageii, architect, ou tile at the office of the 
county auditor. 

Each ptoiKwal must be accompanied with a 
certltlcd chc<'k for two hundred dollars, to be 
forffiteii to SI. lyouls Codnty in the e\ent that 
the proposal wliich said check accom anies 
shall be accepted by the county commissioners, 
and that the person making the proi>osal shall 
fail to comply with Its terms. 

Address all proposals to E. R. Jefferson. In 
care of county audittu'. Duluth, Minn. 

For further infurmation apply to John F. 
Schlenues, su|)erlntendent, Duluth, Mlun. 

The commissioners reserve the right to reject 
any and all proposals. 

Doc 14.1ii-21-24-28Jan 1-4-H.U-16-1M8. 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now-"and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be c'elight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselvi s 

Your real(ty) friends, 

c. L mu\ & CO., 



^n Isiondr/maidis hope 

is Ihe-S/llM • CI^JS • SOAf- 

^1 pFit saves hS[ herVurie and her kW, 
^ ji Aid s\e]] fjjid tl|at Jier clothes wilh a 

I 1 brilliaJiq/ ^Jows 

If'- ipjvi aj-e^er than those of her 




\^m^/. " f" ' 



L 



^ - 1^ i .0Aj/,4^A 



./'^.Z^t 




SANTA CUAU8 



M a nufacti—d 
only Irv 



K.FAIRB.tKKftCIU 



■ y 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



DR. GKO. It. HAYCOCK, 



Manager 



N 



I HOOM 10, 



Two Nights of Meffiment. 

HOKDAY AID MSDAI, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

First appearance here of 

W. i/V. TILLOTSON'S 

Merry Comedy Comp'y 

In the Nt w York success of two seasons, 

ZIG ZAG. 



Presented with the original cast, headed liy 
the char uinj? soubrette, ANNA BOYD. 



F. HUGO & CO., 

.M ETKOPOL,lTAN BLOCK. 
TELEPHONE 242. ^^ 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER.Hoe Second St. East. 



WANTS, m SALE, ETC 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 



Sale of seal s Thursday, Jan. 23. No advance 

in prices. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 

DULUTH . JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



This we ek, commencing JAN. 13, 
'Oie Great Attraction, 

PRISON LIFE 

—AND— 

The Best \arietj Show in the Northwest 

ADMISSION: 

TEN m\ ! TEN CENTS ! 



AdveititK'iucnts under this head received at 
the lollowiuK |'lacc:^, Itesidca the business of- 
Uce ol Ihe licraid: 

Kndio:i IMiarmacy. 127 TeiUh avenue east. 

IJoyce & Tutiuau, coiner Fourth avenue 
and biiiHTlor street wcbt. 

J. \V. NeUun, No. IHil, corner Eighteenth 
avenue west and Superior street. 

U. Johuson, chief clerk PhUlips hotel. West 
Duluth. 



WANTED— A cook for a small family. In 
quire. ;tJu Eiist Second t-treet. 

WANTED— Bell boys wanted at Hotel St. 
Louis. 

w 



ANTED— Two kitchen ijrir.s at Hotel St. 
ix>uis. 



w 



ANTED— A first-class German nurse g-lrl. 
Address Uoom •Jtr.i. First National bank. 

1 WISH to employ a lew iailles ou salary to 
take charge of my buAUiess at their homes. 
Light, very tasciuatiug aud healthful. Wagea 
ilu |>er wcuc Uelcreuce given. Good pay for 
pan time. Address with eiamp, Mrs. MarioD 
N\ alker, LouisvUle, K.y. 

WANTKD— A girl tor general house work; 
l...mUyot ihix-e. Call lu tore noon, 411 
Ninth avenue east. 



THREE 



JICriEIIG[ 



Bargains 



L.ost. 

L'-IST— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
shape of three rings. Luft in SuiMjrior 
or Duluth. binder will receive rewai-d by 
leaving the same at my office. Itobert G . Mc- 
Doweli, yjT. West buptrior street. 



I taken at once. 



Land situated near 



V»i/.*/'^SALA«Y. wo expenses in advance. 
*^\j\J allowed each mouth. Steady em- 
I'loj ujci.l at homi.' or traveliug. No .soliciting. 
Duiico delivering aud making coUeclious. No 
l>ostal oards. Address with stamp, Hafer Je 
Go., Piqua, Ohio. 



w 



ANTED— Pastry cook, also other 
Inquire Phillips hotel. 



t>elp. 



WANTED— At the Womans Employment 
Uuix-au, Ull iupi-rior street ca«*l, two 
second gills and a doxcu girls lor general 
house work. Employuieut obtalued tree of 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Aycrs. 



i''or Aiaie. 
A heavy working team cheap 



tT^OU SALE 
J at A. W. Eilcr's 'iti\ Lake avenue south 



J."^OK SALE— My residence with 50 or 100 feet 
_ al 315 East oocoml street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. E. A. Gill»ert, ■•:l Board ot Tradtv 



HEAVV HOUSES FOU SALE-15 head of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake Pari, ou 
the Nortljern Pacidc road, lor sale by C. W. 
Harvei'. Cau be sceu at Uowaru baru, on the 
lake shore, Minnesota poiui. Kesideuoe, 'SA 
West Fourth sti-eel. 



Ir^OK RENT- 
J steam, etc 
iicrald oihce. 



i'ur. littiiU 

■Desirable room: bath, gas, 
; orivaie fauiiiy. Address S., 



w 



ANTED— A furnished house for the wla 
Icr. L. J. faustiig. No. '.• Phix'uix block 



Finauclal. 

DULUTH MORTGAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money lu auy amouut ou furni- 
tuie. piauos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval lix>m owner's pos-sessioii ; also ou ware- 
house leceipts, bank slocas. aud any projierty 
ot value; notes discouule.i; partial payments 
received aua your own time granted tor pay- 
a>eut; no delay; money on hand aud furnished 
immediately after security Is approved. Wm. 
Uurkau, .Niauagcr, Room lA Fargusson block, 
Duluih, Mluu. 



IF YOU WISH IX) SELL OH BLY DULUTH 
or sufierior bank stuck, corporal Um or iu- 
vcslment securities, call ou or address B. Mur- 
pbiu. broker, U Banning block, Duluth, Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



"Vr H. WILSON. ATl-OKNEY ANDCOUN- 
J3I • sellor at Law. \V Hi practice In State 
and L ui led Slates l>)urts. All business given 
prompt alleutlou, 44 Fargusson Block, Duluth. 
Mluu. 




-THE— 



32 Fargusson BIdg. 



Greatest Snaps 



"pLASTERlNG. . 

H. T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering doDo. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Othce. room D, Hun- 
ter block. 



M 



us. J. S. DlNWtWDIK, 



Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Stng^ 
ing. Chorus and Choir Ck>uducu>r. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wiggins's, 16 Bast 8u 
perior street, and at residence, 131 Tenth ave. B 



"m^B. H. PARKER ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION, 



8 MILKS BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN i STEBBINS, AKCrilTECTB 
and su|)erintendent8. Office, room No. 
— , Exchange building. 



PALMER Je H.ALL, ARCHITECTS AND 
Suiierlntendcnt.-.room 4»>. Exchange bulld- 
Ing. Duluth. Minn. K. S. Palmer. L. P. Hall. 



In the market. 



ADDRESS 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class in all tppointments. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



Gre.<t French remedy. Dk. LeOccs pk»- 
lODiOAi. iiLLS. from Paris. France, actonly on 
the generative organs In females and posl- 
Uvely cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause t, and all perlo<l leal troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, wai^ 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
tunded. Should not beuseddurlngpregnancy. 
The large i)ropoitlon of the ills to which ladlea 
are subject Is the direct result of a disordered 
and Irregular menstruation. Robt. Stevenson 
& Co.. 1 hlcago. 111., H. Boswarth & Co., MU- 
waukee. Wholesale Agts. The genuine only 
•upplled by Boyoe & Xbtoian. Soft Agts.. ~ 



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DULUTH EVENTNG HEBAU) JAIOJABY 



THE INCLINE PLANE. 



Some Description of the New 

Hillside Railway to be 

Built. 



Ornamental but Very Strong, 

Waitine for the 

Conncil. 



WEST END. 



8ar<ibaKK:«cl !>>' » KiceH I'oint 
Npwa of Skatem 



But<-li«r; 



What Was Done at the Session 

of Street Railway 
Men. 



At the meeting of the directors of the 
Street Railway company, held at its 
office in the Clark building, the principal 
matter under consideration was the in- 
cline railway on Seventh avenue west 
for the Highland Improvement com- 
pany. 

The structure will be immensely strong 
and constructed entirely of iron and 
steel. The framework of the structure 
will be set on iron posts. In addition to 
its substantiality the incline plane will 
be ornamented to a high degree, and a 
handsome piece of work in every re- 
spect. The grade will run from 15 
to '2i feet U) the iLK). There 
will be two cars going continually up 
and down on each track. These cars 
will be drawn by a very stri>ng wire 
cable, from the power house at the 
top of the hill on ninth street. 
Loaded wagons will also be taken up 
and down as required. The estimated 
cx»t of the entire plant is ^■J2o,lKX>. 
It will be begun as soon as the frost is 
out of the ground, provided the contract 
with the Improvement company is rati- 
fied by the city council and this will 
probably be done. The Street Car com- 
pany ask certain rights and privileges in 
the matter of franchises, which the 
Highland company is considering, lliere 
is no doubt but iheee matters will l>e 
amicably arranged in a very few days. 

In regard to improvements in the car 
service: The matter of an electrical sys- 
tem for Duluth was exhaustively dis- 
cussed by the board. Tne conclusion 
arrived at was not to introduce any sys- 
tem at present, until that now being ex- 
perimented on at Miuuea{>olis is 
thoroughly tested. If it proves satis- 
factory that is the system that will be 
used here. In the meantime there will 
be an entirely new equipment of the 
present service. New cars, so construct- 
ed ^ to admit of electrical apparatus 
being applied to them at any time 
when wanted, will be furnished. 
These are built with all the 
latest mo<.lern conveniences, and 
will be a vast improvement over the 
cars now doing duty. The new cars will 
be sixteen feet long. Horses will be 
used instead of mules. A new barn with 
largely increased facilities and tilted up 
with all conveniences will be built early 
in the spring on a site to be selected. The 
tracks at both the Bench street exten- 
sion and the West End will be doubled 
so as to make the service tirst-class. All 
necessary extensions will be made but 
where these will be was not decided 
upon. This point will be settled in a 
few weeks, when another meeting will 
be held at which Mr. Jjowry will be 
present. 

The benefit of having the experiments 
of electrical systems carried on at Minne- 
apolis is very obvious. The policy of 
the company is to put the road in tirst- 
class shape, to keep all necessary im- 
provemeniB up to the highest notch. 
Duluth isnot to be behind any city in 
the state. 



Several are taking ice out of the bay, 
near the point where the Michigan street 
sewer empties. This ia something which 
the health department should look into. 
.V masquerade carnival will take place 
at the Parlor rink this evening. 

Mr. Swan Carlson and Miss Ida M. 
Johnson were married last night at Nor- 
manna Hall, Rev. Colin officiating. 

.■\ young Norwegian says that he was 
sandbagged by a Superior street butcher 
ar^d his employe last Wednesday night. 
The story of the young fellow is that ho 
went into the shop and bought some 
sausage but complained that he had been 
overcharged. Whereupon hot words en- 
sued and while he was passing out the' 
door he was hit on the head with some- 
thing which stunned him. As soon aa 
he got on his feet he started to run, with 
the butcher chasing. When he got in 
front of Chas. Pierce's hardware store he 
was again hit on the head. A policeman 
who bad watched the proceedings in 
front of the store from a distance, 
came up and asked him what was the 
matter. He told him the story as above. 
The policeman went to the shop and 
saw the butcher just then entering; 
but before he could reach him the 
door was locked. Although the of- 
ficer pounded on the door for some time 
the butcher would not appear. The 
butcher is now a defendant in a larceny- 
case and has acquired considerable 
notoriety of late. 

It is rumored that Harry Armstrong 
will not be a candidate for re-election. 
There seems to be no doubt that if he 
would run that he would be elected; but 
other business it is claimed will keep 
him from attending to aldermanic du- 
ties. 

Fi^e young ladies. Misses Lester, Ken- 
nebrook, Johnson, Larson and Jurgen- 
son, were entered in the skating race at 
Twentieth avenue rink last night. The 
first prize was given to Miss Minnie Lar- 
son while the second prize waa awarded 
to Miss Mattie Lester. 

Thomas Pinto, the jeweler, left last 
night for a short visit in Chicago. 

Daniel McDonald has returned from a 
two weeks' visit in Sudburg, Canada, 
where his sister is now residing. 

Miss Gusta Willman of Altona, W'is., 
is spending the winter with Mrs. Chas. 
Court. 308 Gartield avenue. 



EIVE POUNDS OE QUININE. 



Claimed that Nearly that Quan- 
tity Used in Duluth 
Daily. 



finally decided that there is no money in 
fighting, for him at least, and after one 
more glove contest he retires perma- 
nently from the business and never will 
fight with bare knuckles again, for law- 
breaking is decidedly unprofitable. 

ARMOJR VS. THE STATE. 



Call in Drug Stores 
loons for Cold 
Fever Drugs. 



and 
ani 



Sa- 



A MUSIC HALL. 



Something that Daluth Has Loug R«quir«<I 
lor ItA 3f usicalesi. 

A music hall is something that has 
long been needed in Duluth, and at last 
the city mis been furnished with one. 
An addition has been built to the Du- 
luth Music company's music room, mak- 
ing a hall about 40x05, capable of com- 
fortably seating 200 people. In the rear 
of the hall a stage will be built, upon 
which musicales and concerts can take 
place. The stage will be fitted with a 
drop curtain and other accessories. A 
concert piano has also been purchased 
for the room. To further beautify the 
hall. Mr. Anderson will purchase some 
potted plants, and will adorn the walls 
with works of art. 

The acostic properties of the place are 
perfect, no echo being heard. It is the 
intention of Mr. Anderson to give after- 
noon and evening musicales at the new 
hall, and the Mozarts may ase it for con- 
certs and receptions. It is bound to be- 
come a great resort for musical Du- 
luthians. 



Duloth Kaightu Visit Superior. 

About sixty Duluth members of the 
Uniform Rank Knights of Pythias went 
to Superior laot night to attend memo- 
rial aervicea in honor of the founder of 
the order, J. H. Rathbone. The memo- 
rial oration was delivered by Rev. Mr. 
Wright. It was an eloquent tribute to 
the memory of the deceased founder. 
The services were perhaps doubly signiti 
cant from the fact that Mr. Rathbone 
co.mpoeed the rituals of the order at 
Eagle Harbor. At the conclusion of the 
services Allouez division, of Superior. 
Uniform Rank Knights of Pythias, pre 
sented Mrs. Wright with a fine portrait 
of her husband. 



The A inerirun. 

The committee for the investigation 
of the affairs of the derelict American 
Building A Loan association of Minne- 
apolis expects to confer with the gover- 
nor early next week. Mr. Ingalis of the 
local committee thinks that while the 
asstjciation has apparently kept within 
the letter of the law in regard to Us 
methods of doing business, there is a 
strong probability of recovering the bulk 
of the amount paid in by the Duluth 
stockholders. This much accomplished, 
those who have foolishly been allured by 
the specious representations of a Minne- 
apolis rotten building a3so<.'iation will 
jterhaps learn not to do so any more, but 
be content to deal with home associa- 
tions that do business on the square. 

The Tempenmce Tallier. 

Rev. F. E. Sturgis in behalf of Xatick, 
(Mass..) pastors said of Mr. liurdick: 
Mr. Burdick had high recommendations 
when he came to Natick, but the half 
was not told. He far surpassed all ex- 
pectations a." a temperance ^.speaker. It 
is the universal verdict that his equal 
has never Ijeen heard on the temperance 
platform. He has now sjjoken two weeks 
and his addre&ses are as fresh and {nnv- 
erful as the day he began. The town is 
being deeply stirred by his overwhelming 
presentation of the truth. And large 
audiences gather nightly to listen spell- 
bound to his captivating e!<x|Uence. All 
classes are present, and everylxxly mani- 
fests the clotest interest. It is no effort 
to follow him, and once inside the hall 
there is no getting out. 

Very Funny — I'nUer the CircuuttanceA. 

Ashland Press: In order to get even 
with West Superior or enhance its own 
location by the destruction of a formid- 
able rival, Duluth hopes to have a canal 
cut through a point of land opposite the 
mouth of St. Louis river, which means 
entire destruction to Superior bay and 
the harbor of iJuperior. Petitions have 
been sent to Washington from Duluth 
favoring the scheme. Superior has en- 
tered a protest and will defeat it if pos- 
sible. 



A fine gold medal costing 825 is to be 
given to the most graceful lady skater at 
the West End Parlor skating rink. 
Twenty-first avenue and Sui)erior street, 
next Saturday night. Remember this 
race, as it promises to be very exciting. 
Competent judges will decide the race. 
Everybody come and have a good time. 
Capt. S. G. Johnson, manager; T. M. 
Enckson, proprietor. 

Smoke the Endion cigar, the tinest in 
the market W. A. Footk A Co. 

Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



The .>Iozart Concert. 

Following is the program for the Mo- 
zart concert to be held at the opera 
house on next Friday evening. It is 
not necessary to enlarge on the merits 
of this c-oncert. A perusal of the pro- 
gram is sufficient to show the excellence 
of the principals aad the high class of 
music to be given. 

UoDilu, op. 73, for two pianos Chopin 

Madame Beaulieu and Gerard TouainK- 

Loreley, Soprano solo Lizzt 

Miss French. 

Symphony, id major) Haydn 

[Arranjred lor eight hands: Adagio, allegro, 
acdante, minuetto, iille^retto eon brio.l 
Madame Beaulieu, Mi»sea Coetello and Bost- 
wick and Gerard Tonaiug. 

Duett, Vocal Goldbeck 

Miss French and Mr. Robinson. 

Romance, itwo pianos) Sattcr 

Madame Beaulieu and Mr. Tonning. 

Ter/.etlo, from ""Fideiio" Ueeihoveu 

Miss French. Mrs. Gunnis§ and Mr. Roblii-(on. 

Rural dauco and procession Salter 

Madame Beaulieu and Mr. Xouuiug, 

The Bethel Concert. 

Tonight the concert at the Bethel for 
the benefit of that worthy institution 
will be presented. Those having the 
matter in charge say that the program 
will be a finished and elaborate as well 
as enjoyable one. The program will con- 
sist of instrumental and vocal music. 
Charles A. Collins will give several piano 
numbers. Miss French, soprano of the 
Presbyterian church, will sing in solos 
and part songs. J. W. Johnson, the 
well-known basso, will also render a solo 
and will also sing in quartet with Miss 
Slauson, Mr. Wagar and Miss French. 
A male quartet will also be a feature. 
Several other loc^al singers will assist. 
Stephen H. Jones will officiate as accom 
panist. 

The !»., C. & >'. Roiid. 

Money has been secured, it is said, to 
build the Duluth, Crookston «t Northern 
road from Duluth Northwest to the in- 
ternational boundary line, with branches 
from Crookston West to the Red river, 
and from Crookston South to Brainerd, 
Minn. 

That Political Meeting. 
To the Editor of The Herald. 

Will you allow me to state that Wes- 
enberg did not call that meeting, that 
the meeting was called for the purix>8e 
stated by Hans Wahl in Wednesday's 
Herald, and for no other purpose; that 
Wesenberg did not pack that meeting; 
that Mr. Johnson of Bredesen & .John- 
son did state that the contract system 
must be abolished; that he did not state 
that we must refuse support to anyone 
who did not pledge himself to abolish it; 
that O. Stenson was Hall's only straight- 
out supporter; that one other friend of 
Hall's tried to pave the way for Hall 
but in a round-about way and that 
Hall's friends were few but tried to en- 
gineer it for Hall. With these correc- 
tions The Herald and The News are 
both right, with this one additional mis- 
take of The News, that the collection of 
funds for the police cut no figure. The 
expressions I have beard from many 
Scandinavians and others seem to indi- 
cate, that that collection will cut a fig 
ure. ItespectfuUy, M. Wksknukkc;. 



TotjM) Fuhllc : 

From tonight on, until March 1, we 
shall close our store at 7 o'clock evenings 
except on Saturday. The Eagle Cloth- 
ing Co., IS West Superior street. 

Lkvy Bros., Proprietors. 

$JK3..'{3 

Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. TAUS.SIO, 

Phoenix block. 



Apples! Apples! 

The choicest apples to be found in the 
city can be had at Clark &, Metz. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



"Give me a couple of grains of qainine 
with that whiskey," said a customer to- 
day as he leaned expectantly against the 
edge of a bar in one of the most gorgeous 
saloons in the city. 

"Yes, give me some, too; make it four 
grains in mine," said another customer. 
The two men gulped down their whis- 
key, paid for it and departed, and The 
Herald reporter then asked the dispen- 
ser of beverages, "Do you have much 

of a call for quinine?" "Yes," was the 
answer, "I use about two ounces a week; 
it comes in little white porcelain jars 
containing an ounce, which cost me 
$1.25. Since last December I have been 
noticing the increase. Before that time 
an ounce would last me nearly 
a month. I have quite a little call for 
antibrine, too," and the toddy artist 
turned away to minister to the wants of 
another thirsty soul, while the reporter 
put on his thinking cap and sallied out 
in quest of statistics regarding the con- 
sumption of tjuinine in Duluth. A tour 
of sixteen drug stores (not including the 
one in the dual legal grasp of Sheriff 
Shar\'y and Officer Gillon) revealed a 
wonderful increase in the sales of the 
patent drug, and also in antipyrine, 
antifebrine and phenacetine. Seven of 
the leading saloons were visited, and the 
same report was made. 

It is probably speaking within bounds 
to say that the average daily consump- 
tion of quinine in Duluth considerably 
exceeds ;{0,<X)0 grains, or nearly five lbs , 
or nearly three-quarters of a grain jjerday 
for every man.woman and child in the city. 
"Why," said one druggist, "I have just 
sent an order to St. Paul for thirty 
ounces of quinine, and that, in ordinary 
times, is a large order. There is another 
drug called antipyrine, for which there 
is such an increased demand that it is 
almost impossible to get an order for it 
filled in any reasonaljle time from the 
wholesalers; I sent three orders for it, 
and then telegraphed to my wholesalers 
and they went out and bought a bottle 
of the powder from a retailer. Anti 
febrine, too, is getting quite scarce, and 
there is a largely increased demand for 
phemacetine." 

The ordinary or most frequent form 
in which quinine is taken is in capsules 
containing two grains, and then there is 
a large call for pills and powders, ac- 
cording to the prescription or taste 
of the applicant. The cruggists till 
a great many prescriptions calling for 3, 
4 and 5 grain capsules, ane there are a 
number of consumers who take even 
larger doses. Mayor Sutphin wrestles 
with a lO-gram dose of quinine, and 
City Clerk Budden smiles a smile of 
resignation as his favorite dose of 
8 grains of antipyrine in capsules falls 
into his capacious stomach. 

The leading saloon men notice that 
the call for quinine in whisky or brandy- 
comes largely from a new class of cus- 
tomers, or as Tom Connors expressed it, 
"There are a large number of new cus- 
tomers over my bar who have only 
been patrons for the last five or six 
weeks, and it would surprise you to keep 
tab on the list. One gentleman in par- 
ticular, who has known me ever since I 
came to Duluth. and who never bought 
a drink for himself over my bar until 
between Christmas and New Years, now 
gets three drinks of brandy and quinine 
daily." 

The cost of (juinine to the consumer 
in wholesale quantities is about $1 per 
ounce; antifebrine, $1.10 per ounce; 
antipyrine, 81.50, and phenacetine 81, 
and the total consumption is at least 
three times greater than ever before 
known here. 



The Dressed Beef Law Before the Federal 
Supreme Court. 

Washington, Jan. 17. — The case of 
Armour & Co. vs. The State of Minne- 
sota was argued in the supreme court 
today. The case arose through the pass- 
age by the legislature of Minnesota of a 
bill known as the Scheffer dressed beef 
bill which prohibited the importation 
into the state of any dressed beef. Ar- 
mour & Co. do a large business in vari- 
ous parts of the state, especially in the 
northern p^rt of the state, about Du- 
luth, where this case was originally 
heard and are contesting the constitu- 
tionality of the law. W. H. Sanborn of 
St. Paul appeared for them and argued 
that the law was unconstitutional, as it 
interfered with interstate commerce. 
W. C. Goudy also appeared for .\rmou r 
& Co. Gen. Gordon E. Cole of Fari- 
bault; Minn., argued for the state of 
Minnesota that the law is nothing but a 
sanitary regulation. The case was taken 
under advisement. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 

First class In every way. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room In town. "Livery in 
eonnectlou. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open Novonnber I. 



■MINNESOTA. 




NEW HOTEL. 



-THE- 



METROPOLITAN 



St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli ftn<l WnNliinf^lon Stn. 

On Cable Car Line. Beft ThWu iu the Noiuj 
west Katei) £i.(X) and I pwards. 

\V U. Barnes. Manager. 



Mortgages Ifegoliated. 



THE PANAMA NOT DEAD. 



.So Say» tlie Cttiuiuittee .Sent There to Inveii- 
tigate Report*. 

Pana.ma, Jan. 17, via Galveston.— The 
president of the committee which is 
studying the Panama canal works, in an 
interview with a Star and Herald re- 
porter, said the committee had found 
the condition of the works and plant ex- 
tremely satisfactory. He denies the 
statement that the committee, five mem- 
bers of which are here, is or has been in 
any way influenced by the De Lesseps 
party. The committee is composed of 
twelve engineers who have had no con 
nection with or interest in either the 
Panama or Suez canals. 

No report of the work of the engineers 
here will be published until they return 
to Paris and join their associates, who 
are studying plans for the comj>letion of 
the canal. Then a final report will be 
made as to whether the completion of 
the canal, under the conditions conceded 
by Colombia in 1878, is considered pos- 
sible. 

Southeruen UlMurve Arl>or Day. 

Jacksonville, Fla., Jan. 17.— Arbor 
day is being very generally celebrated 
throughout the state. In this city sev- 
eral thousand young trees have been 
planted, the school children participat- 
ing in some of the ceremonies. 



6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Lowest 
security, 
quire of 



ratea for all sizes and frrades 
Before borrowlnfir elsewhere 



N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat, lianlc. 
NATIONAL BANK BUIl Dl 



NQ, 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Certificate of Ameoileil 



Keeovery Aftiiured. 

Chk'aco, Jan. 17. — The announcement 
is made that Mrs. George M. Pullman, 
wife of the sleeping car magnate, who 
has been seriously ill for several weeks, 
and whose recovery was at one time 
despaired of, has passed the crisis and 
that her recovery is assured. 



AilTiCLES OF INCORPORIITIOII 



OF LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY. 



AMONG THE BALL PLAYERS. 

.Jiui Hart to Work InChieaeo; Minor Base- 
ball Notes. 
Chicago, Jan. 17. — Jim Hart, erstwhile 
manager of the Bostons, and who en- 
gineered the trip of the Browns and 
Bostons to the Pacific coast, has arrived 
in the city. He comes to Chicago, it is 
said, to act as secretary of the Chicago 
League club the coming season. He will 
also accompany the team and look after 
its finances. Mr. Hart reported a fairly 
successful trip on the slope. The two 
teams came out about even on the vent- 
ure, but neither made any great money. 

Xatioual Trotting AsAoriatlon. 

Nf.w York, Jan. 17. — A special meet- 
ing of the National Trotting association 
opened at the Fifth Avenue hotel today. 
The question of admitting pacers to the 
standard rank is the most important 
question on the program and definite 
action will be taken regarding it. 

Skaters' Meetinsr. 

Newburg, N. Y., Jan. 17.— The fifth 
annual championship meeting of the 
National Skating association opened 
here today. There is a large attendance 
of amateurs from the East and West, 
and a number of new features will be in- 
troduced for the first time. 



Sporting Notes, 

Manager Hanlon of Pittsburg, will not 
consent to Dunlap's transfer unless he 
secures a good man to take his place. 

President Byrne of the Brooklyn 
League team, will make no opposition to 
the American association placing a club 
in Ridge wood. 

Manager Macullar of the Des Moines 
club, has signed left fielder Walsh of the 
Poughkeepsie club, and right fielder 
Brimblecom of the Peoria club. 

Von der Ahe is going to nake another 
effort to secure those of his reserved 
players who have signed with Players 
league clubs. He says he will pay as big 
salaries as the latter. 

Relative to the reported desertions of 
Tucker and O'Connor, .Ned Hanlon de 
clares that these men will be restrained 
from playing with their teams. They 
accepted advance money from Brooklyn 
and the manager will not consent to its 
return. 

The New York and Pennsylvania 
league, the California Baseball league 
and the Michigan State league^ have 
been accorded protection under the 
national agreement. 

It is whispered about that the Brook- 
lyn club, which is to be placed in the 
American association, would be used to 
fight the Players league team in that 
city, and if the new club did not have 
the financial, it had the moral support of 
the magnates. 

The special meeting of the board of 
arbitration, to select Secretary Byrne's 
successor, will, we presume, be held 
simultaneously with the National league 
meeting in New York Jan. 28. That 
may not suit the convenience of the as- 
sociation members of the board, but 
just the same they must dance as the 
league pipes. 

John L. Sullivan intends to retire from 
the ring after one more battle. He has 



A BurKted Miuiui; Kiiii;. 

Milwaukee, Jan. 17.— The petition of 
John Burton, the once great mining 
king, to be freed from his debts on the 
ground that he is an insolvent was taken 
up in the circuit court today. The total 
of his debts is 8729,985, of which i^'xil, 
495 is secured and 1^198,530 unsecured. 



Waked up Kfl'ectually. 
A lethargic, dormant condititon of the 
liver is hardly to be overcome with dras- 
tic cathartics and nauseous cholagogues. 
A gentler, pleasanter and far more effect- 
ive means exists of arousing the organs 
when somnolent. This is Hostetter's 
Stomach Bitters, vouched for by the 
medical fraternity, tested by tlie public 
for many years. A resumption by the 
biliary organ of its secretive function, 
with the activity attendant upon health, 
a return to regularity of the bowels, and 
a renewal of digestion, are the no less 
happy and certain results of using the 
Bitters systematically. Its laxative 
effect is never painful and drenching, its 
tendency being rather to perpetuate 
regularity than to produce a copious 
attion. Malaria, nervousness, debilitv, 
kidney troubles and neuralgia it sub- 
dues effectually. 



A Keal Spooli. 

A special to one of our leading daily 
papers from Cochrane, Wis., says: "For 
several years the existence of a ghost 
has been reported here. Last Friday a 
party was organized to investigate. .Ar- 
riving at the ghost's walk, we saw an 
object about 10 feet high and (! or 7 
inches in diameter. It slowly advanced 
to within a rod of the most daring. 
Some of the party fled, but those who 
remained saw it suddenly disappear." 
No European family of ancient lineage 
and blood, with any pretentions to note, 
is without a veritable and well-authen- 
ticated ghost. "The Burlington" is 
away ahead of any of its competitors in 
this respect, as well as in those of fast 
time, smoothness of track, and elegance 
of equipment. This is recognized by the 
traveling public generally, and allowed 
by all who patronize the line. For tick- 
ets, time tables, rates, and any informa- 
tion, address agents of "The Burling- 
ton" or connecting lines, or write to W. 
J. C. Kenyon, general passenger agent 
Chicago, Burlington & Northern railroad, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



B 



RO 



WN 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



—AND- 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and you will be per- 
fectly satisfled. 



19 West Superior Street. 



STATE OK MINNESOTA, ( „ 
Cor.NTV or St. I.duis, f 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS. 
That we. Oz!ira 1'. Stearns, president, 
JUKI Will. (' rfrtrjfeul, seen-tiiry, of l.;iliesido 
Lund coinpHiiy, a eorporiition org:iiii/.e<l and 
doiii^ l>iiKiues.-« under tlie laws of Minnesota, 
beinjf duly and severally sworn, do Uereliy cer- 
tify and depose that al a nxKliir nieellngof 
t lie shareholders of the said Lakeside Land 
eonipiiny. duly called hikI held at the ollices of 
said <-oiiipan>' at Oulutli, Miniiosola, on the 
fourth day of .lanunry, l.s'.K), at two o'clock in 
tlie afternoon <jf said clay, tlie articles of Incor- 
l>oraUon of said corponit ion were amended so 
as to Increase the capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from one liiindred and twenty-tlve thou- 
sand dollars, to tlve linndi-t>d thousand ilol- 
lars and so as to increase the uuinbor 
of shares in the capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from twelve hundred and fifty to tlve 
tho.isand. by ainciidlnf< Article ."? of said 
ori^r.nal articles of incorporation, wUlcIi fixes 
the iiinoiiut of the eiipltai stock of said cor- 
iwration at one hundred and twenty-tlve thou- 
sand diiUars, so as tu read as follows, to-wit: 

ARTICLE 3. 

"The amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
poration shall bo Bve hiiiidre<l thousand dol- 
lars, (ifjj(»l,(KXi.Oil); to be paid in on call of the 
board *)f directors." 

And by amendiiiK Article 7 of said orig-inal 
articles of Incorporation, which ttics the num- 
ber of shares in the ciipital stock of said eor- 
porpation at twelve hundred and fifty, so as 
to read as follows, li>\vlt : 

AHTICLE 7. 

"The number of shares in the capita! stock 
of the corp<jration shall l>e five thousand (5,niJ0i. 
each of tlie par value of one huinlred dollars 
i*K«l ui), which shares when fully paid up 
shall be nou-assessablo." 

That there were present at said meetinfr, 
who voted in favor of said aniendinents a 
majority In number of the shareholders of 
sjiid corj'oratiou, who held a majority In 
amount of llie shares of stock of the same. 

O7.oit\ P. Ste.\k.\s, 
Wm. C. Sakoent, Preaidont. 

Secretary. 



SnlKscribed and sworn to before me this '^th 
day of January, liStO. W. E. Perkv, 

Notary Public, 
St. Louis county, Minnesota. 
Notarial Seal, 
St. Louis Co., Mlun. 



OFFICK or RKGISTCR OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, )_ 
County of St, Locis. f '"■ 

1 herebv certify that the wr.hin articles were 
tiled in this office for record on the f*th day of 
January, A. U. l««t, at ;i:10 o'clock p. ui., and 
was duly recorded luUookG of . Miscellaneous 
pag-e 6. 

Amos Sheph.uid, 
Iteirlsteror Deeds. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, t 

I)EI'AIIT.ME.VT Of ST.\TK. > 

1 hereliy certify Unit the within Instrumen t 
was tiled for record in this oflice on the 11th 
dayofJanuarv A. 1). l.'^ltO, at W o'clock a. 
m., and was duly recorded In book Y of incor- 
porations on pagu '.!70. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 

Jan. 13, 14, In, 16, 17, 18, 30. 



Mortgage Sale. 



WHEKEAS, DEFAULT HAS BEEN MADE 
in the c'TiKlltlous of a certain mortgajrc, 
e.xecnted and dellveix'd by Mary ^herwin and 
Elijah O. Sherwin, her husband, iiiortffutrors, 
to Alon/.o J. VVhlteman, inortjfajjee, dated the 
eleventh day of October A. I)., llSbV, 
and duly recorded in the oBico of 
tlie re;ristcr of deeds of the county of 
Saint Louis and state of Minnesota 
on the twenty-eijfbtli day ..f November A. D., 
1>*T, at nine o'clock a. m.. In book Zi of 
inorttrages, on page 13. such default consist- 
ing of the non-payment of the principal and 
Interest moneys secured by said mortgage, on 
w^hich said mortgage tliere is chilmed to be due 
at the date of this notice the amount of 
live thousand sl.\ hundred and thirty-tlve and 
55-1110 ili),(i;j.j.5r)) dollars, principal and Interest, 
and no action or pnx'eediug has been Insti- 
tuted at law or Id ciiulty to recover the debt 
.secure«l by said mortgage, or any part thereof; 
and 

Whereas, said mortgage was duly 
assigned by the .said Alonzo J Whiteman, 
mortgagee, to Augusta Let tan, by assignment 
dated the sei-oud day of November A. D., 18t<7, 
iinil reco'ded in the oUlco of the register of 
dwds of the county of St. Ijouis in the stat« of 
Minnesota, on tlie tweiitj -eighth day of Novem- 
ber A. D., 1S87, at H o'clock a. m.. in tKX)k P of 
mortgages, on page 377. 

Now, notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale coutalne<l In said 
mortgage, and of the statute in such 
c^e made and provided, said mortgage 
will l)e I'oreclostHi by sale of the mortg ged 
premises therein described, at imblio auction, 
at the front door of the cotirt house. In the city 
of Duluth, in llu> county of St. Louis and state 
of Minnesota, on Monday the twenty-seventh 
day of January A. D.. is".n>, at ton o'clock in 
the loronixju, to satisfy the amount 
which shtill then be due on said mortgage, with 
the interest thereon, and costs and expenses 
of sale, and seveuty-ttve dollars attorney's 
fees, as stipulated iu said mortgage in case of 
foreclosure. 

The iiremlses described In said raorgage. and 
so to Ik- sold, are the lots, pieces or parcels of 
land, situate Iu the county of 8t. Louis and 
State of Minnesota, and known and described 
as follows, to-wit: 

Lots number thirteen (13) and fourteen (U) In 
block niinilier nine (!'i, Portland ilivision of Du- 
luth. according to the recordcnl plat thcrtH>f ou 
file in the office of the register uf deeds in and 
fur the county of St. Loms. 

Dated I)ect>mtjor 3rd, l.s-«. 

ACOCSTA LETTAr, 

Assignee of Alonzo J. Whiteman, 
Mortgagee. 
Walter Ayehs. 
Attorney of Augu.sla Lcttau. 
Assignee. 
Deo. 12. 1», -M, Jan. 2, 0, Iti. 23 



D&E.G. WEST'S 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT 

Rpi'elfle for Hysteria. DIxzliiess, Fits, Neuraltrla, Wake 
fiilnfsf), Mental IVprcKsioii. Soltenlnifof tlie lirain.nr 
^ultill;( ill in^anily and Iciulinur to miser-y (lt.,-av afTil 
ileiith, Prt'iniitun* "OUl Agt*. Il.trrctinoss. Loss ol l*ow,.r 
in either sex. Involuntary Lobf-es, antl Hpennatori hrea 
raurt«d bv over-exct tion of the biain. i^ejr-nl'Ti'e oi 
over-lndrlffiMU'e. tach box contain* one nn>ntir- treat- 
ment. 81 a box. or six lor $5, tent bv mail prepaid. 
With each onler for fix tiox,^**. will hend pun liaser 
^araiit4*o to n-fnni] niont-y it' flip treatment fails to 
core. Uuarant«e« issueU unit Kuuuiue buld uuly l>jr 

Boyce & Totmao. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 
Mian. 



Boiis i lie Hi 



FOR SALE: 

50-U--ln llcreage, - 
H-15-lri taie, - 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertf, - 



|UUU| 



1, 



WANTED! 



Purchasers for 



l)UUUi 



Lots for Sale as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



601 West Superior Street. 




and Nice-Lying Lots 




On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



HARWOOD'S 

Citj Transportation Freight and [xpress, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue Weet. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VEBY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 




CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFICE 

17 First Avenue West. 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM m PASIORET-SIEIISOII BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - - MINN. 



FOR SALE 



Forty Acres 



Tliiee Good Building Lots on Nintli Street, 



Near Third avenue east 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 




ADJOINING^ 




-AT A 



Bargain 



Inquire of 



LS.. 



Postofflce Box A A. 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



C-i^IBE e:eib-^il.id- 



HIE BOLTON HOT WM MM 



Hfis the best record for the longest time 
in the coldest climate. See one set up 
in our store. 

F>. V. DWYER & BROS., 

Telephone 179. | 207 W. SUPERIOR STREET. 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



J Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
A^ kinds of furs a specialty. Ji^'Good workmen- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 
209 East Superior Street, • • Duluth, Minn, 







i 

1 

i 

i 


- 


1 


1 




t 








i 
I 

■ 

i 




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1 

1 


I 




1 


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1 


1 


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1 
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1 








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1 

5 


1 


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O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms SIO, S11 and i\l Dulotli Union national Bank Building. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DULUIH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 






Americc.n Exchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. SURPLUS 

$300,000 $200,000 
100,000 10,000 



! ,000,000 
I 00,000 
100,000 
100.000 
260,000 



I 00,000 
26,000 







i 


! 1 




1 


\ 






\ 1 

4 — , . 





.-^- 



IB- gt- ^ Kl^ l J. 'g l ■ 



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liUI.XJTH WTENIUfa HEBAIiD: JAXUART 17, 1890 



WOHLD OF C0M.1RCE. 



The Markets Are All Dull 
Grain and Stocks 
Today. 



for 



DISTRICT COURT. 



Caiteii; 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



There was more life in the last few 
minutes of the market today than there 
has been for some time. It was due to 
the break in wheat at Chicago and the 
sympathetic decline here. Prices opened 
Ig lower here, improved shgatly. then 
held steady until near 1 o'clock, when 
sellers became plentiful and there was a 
decline of \^. The close was rather 
weak, but not so weak as at other places. 
While Chicago was dropping ~g, Duluth 
declined only 3c. Sales were fairly good. 

Cash wheat was steady and tirm all 
day. Xo. 1 hard closed at 79 and Xo. 1 
northern at TG'^, Xo. '2 northern sold 
and closed at TiMai }4 a'>ove yesterday. 
January closed at 79 nominal, for 1 hard 
and 76^ j sellers for Xo. 1 northern. May 
Xo. 1 hard opened at 8i'4, sold after- 
wards at Si'4c'<^^8i dropped and closed at 
Si, after salad of a liberal quantity. 
Buyers were offering 83 'g '•or more. May 
Xo. I northern closed at 81 bid. 



the crimi- 
which day 

his second 
at Tower 
appointed 



The Ouilv .Moreiuent. 

Cars on track here: Wheat 5, corn 4, 
oats -. Kaceipts: Wheat 3,497 bu., corn 
8.907 bu. Shipments: Wheat 3,435 bu. 
Inspection: Wheat, 2 cars of No. 1 hard, 
11 c.irs of Xo. 1 northern, 1 car of Xo. 2 
northern; corn, 4; oats 10. Minneapolis 
reported cars 2u2, against 227 yesterday. 
Minne.ipolis receipts, wheat, 117,100 bu. 
Shipments: WQeal, IS.JGJ bu; flour, 2.3,- 
924 bbls. 

stock i«i>-4>ip, 

CHiCAiiO, J. in. 17. — The market was 
again narrow but there was more dis- 
position on the part of shorts to cover. 
The Vanderbilt stocks were all very tirm, 
Canada southern and Big Four each 
scoring a sharp advance. The granger 
stocks although weak early in the day, 
were in detuaad at the decline. X'orth- 
western, Rwk Island and Burlington 
will lead the marke: in a sharp advance 
before very long. Wisconsin Central 
rallied on the announcement of its lease 
by the Northern Pacitic, closing at an 
advance of about two points for the day. 
Money ruled easy and railroad earnings, 
notably lh<)se of the St. Paul were re- 
markably good. A good bank statement 
is expected tomorrow and higher prices 
for thd general list before there is much 
further deline. 



General Proreediiigs in the Civil 
i»iuiinon»' Murdvr Trial. 

Judge Stearns today set cases 150, 156, 
157, liS for Saturday. At the close of 
court yesterday, the jury in Shellen- 
berger va The Duluth Terminal Rail- 
way returned a verdict for the plaintiff, 
awarding ^1000. A stay of thirty days 
was grauted. This morning the case of 
H. E. Long et al vs. same defendants 
was given to the jury, who returned a 
verdict of 81500 for the plaintitis, and 
the defendants obtained the usual thirty 
day's stay. Another case with the same 
parties interested was then taken up, 
and was followed by another brought 
against the same defendants by F. D. 
West. 

Judge Stearns will resume 
nal calendar on Monday on 
John Simmons will receive 
trial for the murder of Cook 
last summer. The court has 
l\. P. Edson to conduct the defense. 
Both sides will tight hard and a number 
of new witnesses will be summoned. 
The indictment is for murder in the 
tirst degree. The Gorseline-Sims as- 
sault case will also come up for trial. In 
Judge Ensign's room yesterday, just be- 
fore adjournment cases were disposed of 
as follows: Hanchett et. al. vs. Hartley 
et. al., to be tried Feb. 4. Wise vs. 
Wise, to be tried Feb. 3. Wells, Stone 
Mercantile company vs. Holland A 
Thompson et. al., consolidated with Xo. 
137. D. A. Petre vs. R. S. Munger et. al., 
set for trial Jan. 2.1. Long vs. Miller, 
dismissed on motion of plaintiffs. 

In the case of A. W. Eiler vs. Andrew- 
Berg judgment was ordered for the 
})laintitf this morning for 870.50, with 
interest at 7 per cent from Aug. 18. 1888. 
A hearing was had in the case of the 
Doty Manufacturing company vs. M. W. 
tilenn, on a motion by the plaintiff's at- 
torneys to strike out the defendant's 
answer as frivolous. The case was con- 
tinued one week to enable defendant to 
present alfidavits as to the truth of his 
answer. 

The case of Erickson & Lsiisen vs. 
Ludington. in the drug store puzzle, 
came up. but was not hoard because the 
plaintilfs' attorney had not been served 
with a notice, and the judge granted an 
order extending the time. 



FBOM WEST OOLUTH, 



Some News of General Interest 

to West Duluth 

People. 



Personal Matters and Items of 

News of a Dull 

Day. 



THE IRON RANGE IN. 



New Vui V ...,. ks. 

Tie following areclosing prices on the 
Nt M Vork stock exchange as reported bv 
W. W. Bill Jt Co.: 



Today. 
ChlcAffo, Burlln^on & Qulncy . . 105^ 

Amerleau <"otton Oil 294 

MHs«)ur! Hai'irtc 72?g 

Nonbern P^ieiUo preferred 73^ 

ChU'iii^o. .Milwaukfe & St. Paul.. 6«>4 

SujTiir i'rust 6H'j 

G:i8 lYust 46 

Loiii-<viil(> 4 .VashviUe (<6S 

f" V Xorth western lio 

i i<l «6 

i, , ~ '-^ — mn 

iJt^i'UK 3654 

Tenn. o al and lro» 8o'4 

Kiihmoud Termioal 2i)\ 

Altbisiiu [ 81 

Deiawiie i Laokawanoa..!!! .!!l35'^ 

New EiijflanJ 44:^ 

In'adTrust ',"." amj 

Wf-lern nioQ 84iu 

Union Ha.iac usv 

WIscoujIq Central 34^4 

OU iSji 



Yester- 
day, 
luti 

bo\ 
4»i 

110 

ao\ 

104 14 

211, 
31 
1354 

«'i 

a^, 

84 

33>, 
IO5I4 



It Denies the KiRlits <>l the Manitoba, But 
Wantii the Laud It.self. 

The Duluth A; Iron Range road yester- 
day afternoon tiled a complaint in the 
office of the clerk of court, in which it 
asks that the road may be a party to the 
suit of the Minneapolis A St. Cloud 
(.Manitoba) railway vs. the Duluth & 
Winnipeg. It wishes to be an inter- 
venor because it claims title to certain 
of the lands in dispute between the 
other companies. It also claims that 
the Duluth A Winnipeg grant was to be 
given from that of the Duluth A Iron 
Range, provided the latter was forfeited. 
The Duluth A: Iron Range has earned 
G<_6,iXX) acres of swamp land, of which 
C5.484 acres have been taken. Even 
w ith the land in question the Iron Range 
cannot get enough land in the limits 
designated by its grant. The complaint 
alleges that the Minneapolis & St. Cloud 
has no right to select its land grant 
from St. Louis, Lake or Cook counties, 
and that therefore it is not entitled to 
the land in question. 

The fact of the matter is that this is 
the same old legislative tight that made 
things hot last winter in the state capi- 
tol. It is well known to those interested 
that the Duluth Jc Iron Range road, or 
rather the Minnesota Iron company, 
was very deeply involved in the tight at 
the legislature, in fact, had more to do 
with it than the Manitoba. It seems as 
if it would be as deepl> in the fuss before 
the courts. 



Several additions to West Duluth will 
be put on the market soon. Lovett &. 
Co. will put Sixth division lots up for 
sale some time this month. New addi- 
tions would have been placed on the 
market Jan. Ist, but in view of the pos- 
sibility of several large industries being 
established within a short time, it has 
not been possible to place any values on 
the lots. 

X'ext spring a two-train Short line ser- 
vice will run over the St. Paul & Duluth 
tracks Ijetween Duluth, West Duluth 
and West Superior. 

There was very little excitement at the 
election yesterday to decide on the ques- 
tion of paying for the village hall. There 
were 157 votes cast, of which 131 were 
"for building." 

Mrs. E. Stevens arrived from Aiken 
yesterday afternoon to spend a few weeks 
visiting her daughter, Mrs. E. J. Luther, 
wife of the publisher of The Sun. 

Fred Kerslon, manager ot the glazing 
department of the West Duluth Manu- 
facturing company, put in an appear- 
ance yesterday. Grip has had him in 
charge. D. M. Still, shipping clerk 
for the same company, is under the 
weather. 

Special union services are still con- 
tinued by the Baptist and Presbyterian 
churches. They have been discontinued 
at the others on account of so much 
sickness. 

A. McRae, foreman of the blacksmith 
shop at the Iron Bay works, with his 
family, arrived yesterday. He has bought 
a house on Fifth street north, in the 
Fifth division, and will go to house- 
keeping at once. 

Meagher & Kennedy, the.clothing men 
on the corner of Third street north and 
Central avenue, made an assignment 
yesterday to C. W. Iloyt. Liabilities are 
about 85000; assets, probably S4000 to 
$4500. 

W. B. Gregory, or "Billy" as he is 
known by his known by his friends, is 
very sick. Mr. Gregory is the second 
bookkeeper at the Minnesota Iron Car 
company's office and came out here from 
Richmond. Last night his phvsician 
was up with him all night. He had the 
grip tirst and then took cold and it set- 
tled on his lungs. 

The directors of the Manufacturers 
Bank held a meeting yesterday afternoon 
and elected all the old officers. 



KILGORE & SIEWERT 

Will soon make a lively stir in 

Hats - and - Men's . Furnishings. 



Fine 



AWAIT DEVELOPMENTS. 



Remember the place, St. Louis Hotel Block. 



PERSONAL. 



Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Myers leave in a 
few days for a visit at Mrs. Myers' old 
home in Connecticut. 

Mr. X. H. Wilson has returned frofli a 
trip to .Vshland. Mr. Wilson absented 
himself rather unexpectedly, which oc- 
casioned considerable uneasiness among 
his friends until his return this morning. 

Mr. W. D. Tomlin hjis been engaged 
to write a long article for a book on 
"Fresh and Salt Water Fishing," the 
book to be richly illustrated and pub- 
lished by Rand, McXally & Co., Chicago. 
Mr. Tomlin will write on pike and pick- 
erel. 

County Auditor LaVaque will return 
from a business trip to St. Paul tomor- 
row. 

Judge Ensign's little daughter is quite 

ill. 

Senator Truax has returned from a 
week's stay in Hastings. 

Mr. T. B. Casey, leading director of the 
Doluth &, Winnipeg road, was in the 
city today. Mr. Casey has not been East 
for several weeks. 

Miss M. Watson of Pembina, Xorth 
Dakota, is a guest at The Spalding. 

Mr. H. H. Myers left yesterday for a 
visit to Waterville, Ohio, and the East. 

Mr. Willis M. Roberts returned last 
night from a long business trip to the 
East. ' 

Mr. S. Wilson ami wife, Cloquet, are 
guests at the Merchants. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sohemerhorn ot 
Marquette, are visiting in the city. 

Mr. J. R. Myers is visiting in St. Paul. 

City Assessor Cooley is in St. Paul and 
will be back tomorrow. 

Mr. A. E. Brown, of Brown Bros., has 
just recovered from severe illness. 



Notice to Contfactors. 



quality and 
ro 

hcv will also 

kxikg and bars 

mechanical de- 



Sealed proposals will be recetve<l until 2 
o clock p in., Jauuary .Wth, IWW. by E. K. Jef- 
ferson, chairtniin of comniittee on court house 
:iud eouiity Jail, for the cell work in the new 
county jail. In accordaiuo with plans, suocifl- 
cuthjns drawn by O. U. Traphajfen, architect, 
on flic at the olBce of the county audlKjr, 

Uiddcrs will specify what 
strensrth of chramo steel they propose to use, 
and submit sample of same. They ■■ ' 
culimit drawiiiirs or samples of kx-'k 
they propose to use, and all 
vkri'S connected with the cells. 

Rath proposal must be accompanied with a 
clK'Ck tor ave hundred dollars to be forfeited 
to St Louis county. In the event that the pro- 
po-sal which said chei-k accompanies shj.ll be 
accepted by the county commissioners, and 
that the person makloflr the proposal shall fall 
to comply with its terms 

Address all proposals to E. R. Jefferson. In 
care of county auditor, Duiutli, Minn, i'or 
further information apply to 

JOHX F. SCHbECNES, 

Superintendent, Duluth, Minn, 
ine commissioners reserve the rls-bt 
jeet any ami all i>ro|Kwals. 
Dec 14-ls-•.*l-24-*^Jau M-s-ll-l.^iy-gs 




U^^ 




to re- 



CHICHESTER-S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

M '"" 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. Macf.\klaxk &: Al.sti.n. 



Chlcsjjo Grain UuMlp. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wres of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler & Ldwis: 

Wheat opened tirm and higher on re- 
ports of good demand for cash both here 
and at countrj- p<5ints, which, however, 
was not conlirmed. I'he early market 
was actively bulled by parties who 
bought h'eavily yesterday, but they could 
not hold the price, outside support and 



bull 



news b.nng equally scarce. The 



lat«r market was a contest as to whether 
wheat should be put, large numbers of 
those privileges having been sold at Slf^ 
for May. the close developing into a 
selling foot race between those who 
bouglit wheat yesterday and those who 
were liable to have it put them todav. 
The close was active and verv weak, 
shorts being the only buyers. 

Corn and provisions steady and very 
dull The only feature in ' provisions 
was the purchase by Armour of a con- 
siderable amount of Mav lard. 



THE CHAMBER WINS. 

Tb« Supreme Court .Ittirniii the Declsiouof 
the Loner Cnurt. 

A supreme court mandate affirming 
the decision of Judge George W. Holland 
in the case of the Duluth Chamber of 
Commerce vs. Jos. E. Knoftlton et al. 
has been received and tiled in the clerk's 
ollice. The total amount which O'Brien 
A Knowlton will have to pay is §'230.31. 
The defendants refused to pay their as- 
sessments to the Chamber audwere sued 
to recover $150 then alleged to be due. 
In many respects this was a test case. 
Snively & Craig represented the plainlitl 
and Allen JcParkhurst the defendants. 



Christian Science Incurporation. 

Articles of incor(»oration of the Chris- 
tian Science church of Duluth were 
drawn up today. The church starts out 
with a membership of about twenty-five 
perstius. For the present the services 
will be conducted in the rooms 
in the Pastoret block. The society 
intends building a church at 
an early date. The incorporation is 
be known as the Church of Christ. In 
connection with the church is a dispen- 
sary for healing t e sick and charitable 
purposes. The terms of admission are 
that members will be required to agree 
to the platform of Christian Scientists, 
and also to the tenets of the society. 
The otlicers will consist of five directors, 
a treasurer and clerk. These will be 
elected tomorrow. The articles will be 
filed with the register of deeds in a few 
days. 



Kegltter Itesiime. 

At The Spalding: li. A. Kilgour, 
Philadelphia; J. A. Kohner, tJ. E. An- 
giere, H. S. Piucen, Xew York; A.Edger- 
ton, E. Fitzgerald, Charles Treynd, J. E. 
Sobdell, St. l>aul; T. B. Casey, L. S. Gil- 
lette, A. S. Huey, B. B. Townsend. Min- 
neapolis; T. II. Chandler, Des xMoines; 
C. S. Scribner, A. Kruppheimer, (J. P. 
Jones. Chicago. 

At the St. Louis: C. S. Bundy, Bes- 
semer; A. A. Leissing, Milwaukee; J. J. 
Kelly, H. S. .lones, Chicago: H.M. Stock- 
ing. Eau Claire; C. L. Fulton, R. S. 
Mars, Minneapolis. 

At the Merchants: G. B. Winter, 
Racine; C. D. Campbell, A. J. McGee, 
St. Paul; S. A. Oakcs. Mishegaune,Wi8.; 
J. A. Cleveland, Ely; H. X. Huntington, 
R. A. Parker, Minneapolis; Frank .\lger. 
Two Harbors. 




RED CROSS DIAMOND BRAND. 

Safe anil jtlwar- r- liable. LttUleA, 
»«k Ilrui;rf«l for IHamund Brand. In 
red, m>-i«lllc boi. ., ►■.led with bluej 
ribiK)n. T»Lf no other. All plIU \ 
In puteboiM boiM. pink wrappers. »re 
dancrruaii ('ountrrfelts. Send 4«. 

.'."■'.""I'l',/"' .'■"■'''"'""■ "•ilmonl«U and 
Kt'llcr r«r I.udlc^'* m Utter, br rctara 
null. Name f'aprr. 
CklekMtf r Chwi'l Co., ImdhM g^ rUtaidai 



o 
o 

Hi 

o 

o 

o 

I- 

co 

z 
< 



GREAT SHCilCE SIILE 



-until stock 



Piper 



CiTy BRIEFS. 



Minneapolis Close. 

llr!r!»KAPOLi.s Jan. K.— CI slngr quotattons: 

May, ^'i-„No. 1 Dorthero, January, Wi; 
February, .,: May, ^0',: on track. TT'.aTT^ 

northern, Januarv. 74; February 

4I1; on track. Tf^iTti. 



Mo. 



No. 2 
May, : 



i; 



Chi<aK<> Clo>e. 
Chicago, Jan. 17, 1:1.5 p m 
easy. January. 7ii?i; May, SI. 
Jauuary, auj,; .Mav, 41K. 



close.— Wheat 
Cora, steady ; 



R£AL_t£rAT£. 

A Recorder the Keal 1 tate Traosfera for 

34 Hoarii, Knding at Noon. 

Jofieph Lifortune to Zenith Savings & 

:it a.'--ociatl. in, an undivided 

■ I n lot '>. blixrk B, Trigg's & 

- - ... - Bav Front divUloa of Uu- 



I 



lulb 

S€l»(Kid rj»nd company to Vf V Chinn, 
■ " biixk Ki, village plat of 



$ 216 



:J0, 



**«- , -Ja'cH w" Pearson; 'lots 65', 
6. au.i bw on Seventh street, lot 47 on 

r™".».'""TI-J"' J^ "" Fifth street, 
'°'"Jf "i'*^'*^ "°*^o"rtb street, lot 65 
on Third street, all In vllUge ot Fond 
du Lao 

EllZibeth E .Merrltt tojohn E MerriU 
lots lo and I?, in block -'7, township of 
Oneota *^ 

Alphon-e Laeour^e to Howe Lurnber 
coaipany. iht- s , 01 sw'i and nwV of 

T^iT *;.^1.'^V.'* ■"*''* of *« ■*• 2!*-«o-lo 

=-1 .^ '.' ';'p9 to F W Winship. the 

Adeline E VValker to Marvji Morrl3<in. 
the^e'tof swi, and Be>4 of !«. and 
SW* of nw^i and W, of gwW of 20 

and nw 1.1 of •:'^^•,:i-l■^. '^'"»o' *". 

GG Hartley to Martha' Anna MetcaVf! 
the u:, of ne'i of »eh, of a6-50-15. . . . . 



350 



1 

750 
2,000 

2,400 
2,000 



8 transf ers; total $7 718 

CI TY BRIE FS. 

r^'^^lu'irV'^^f^ °l incorporation of the 
Duluth Realty Investment association 
as announced in yesterdays Herald 
were hied todav. 

Two runaways, in which no one was 
injured nor damage done, were exciting 
incidents on Railroad street this morn- 
ing. 

The contest ease United States vb P 
A. Colons and Joseph Lloyd was on at 
the land ot iice this mor ning. 

Two Railroad Schemes. 

George L. Roppert, traveling passen- 
ger agents of the Rock Island and Al- 
bert Lea routes, and A. C. Miner, who 
holds a similar position on the Wiscon- 
sin Central road, are in town today 
They are looking up business for their 
roads, and have distributed some pretty 
BTJUvenirs in advertisement of their lines. 
The Central has a Russian leather card 
case, and the Rock Island is giving to 
favored ones memoranda tablets of 
^on.- with leaves for each week day. 
Both are expensive and tasty pieces of 
workmanship. 

Children'H UurtnentH 

At auction in the St. Louis old dining- 
room. Sale from 2 to <> p. m. and 7 to 9 
p. m. 



The Duluth .Academy of Music re 
cital has been postponed until two 
weeks after the Mozart concert. 

An entertainment is to be given at the 
Bethel in a week or two, which will 
comprise some tine eiocutionary selec- 
tions by a celebrated elocutionist. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture w^ere recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
12 below; 3 p. m.,2 below; 6 p. m., 1 
below; 10 p. m., 1 below; 7 a. m.. 3' 
below; 9 a. m., 2 below; 12 m., 4 
above; Maximum, 4= above. Minimum, 
12 below. Daily range, 16°. 

The Minstrel club, mentioned some 
days ago in The Herald, will meet Mon- 
day night for rehearsal and talk in the 
Benz building. 

Large (luantities of cord wood are 
being hauled by farmers from the 
vicinity of Hermantown,and sells readily 
on the streets at an average price otHn 
cord. 

H. H. Bell has had a rink built west of 
his residence for the recreation of hie 
children and their juvenile friends. 

The street gang is l>eing utilized U> 
clean the snow from sidewalks in front 
of non-resident's lots. 

City Engineer Fuller's child, which 
was dangerously ill. is much better. 

Daniel Danielson of Sweden and Fred 
A. Schaupp have taken out hrst natural 
ization pajiers. 

George Albert, 1-year old son of Mr 
and Mrs. Sanford Wilson, died last night 
of enteritis. 

Five births were reported at the board 
of health olBce this morning. 

Every county officer in Lake county is 
said to be laid up with sickness of some 
description, at least an attorney so 
stated to Judge Ensign in open court 
this morning. 

Simon Clark presented police head- 
quarters with a hue barrel of apples to- 
day. 

M. B. Harrison returned this afternoon 
from the East, where iie has been in con- 
nection with some large real estate deals. 
He says the English syndicate deal will 
go through. 

Mr. H. L. P^olsom and R S. Libby, 
Boston business men, are in the city. 

.Vlr. J. C. Morse of the Minnesota Iron 
company arrived in town from Tower 
this noon. 



Col. Uudley'-t I'uneriil. 

The remains of Col. E. L. Dudley, late 
general manager of the St. Paul & Du- 
luth, were taken to St. Louis where his 
funeral will occur. Messrs. Giltillan, 
Clark and Beeston of the St. Paul A: 
Duluth, accompanied the body. Gen- 
eral Freight and Passenger Agent 
Plough will meet the funeral train at 
Marshalltown. For the present Presi- 
dent Hayes, who arrived in St. Paul 
Wednesday, will discharge the duties of 
general manager. 



The Lower Court. 

The criminal calendar was brief this 
morning. Only one drunk, Charles 
Olson, who paid aS-j fine. Peter Sjosehus 
brings suit against McArthur Bros, and 
Xolan & Duggan for injury to his 
premises by blasting last year. He claims 
9IOO damages. 



Do Vou Want Cloaks. 

Big auction sale at St. Louis" old 
ingroom, commencing Saturday at 
G p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. 



din- 
2 to 



-South Superior. 
The South Superior boomors are pre- 
paring to launch »nother industry. This 
time It 18 said to be a woolen mill, which 
will eaiploy several hundred hantis. The 
cotnpany haa gotten out a plat, upon 
which 18 shown a cut of the LaBelle 
Carriage works. Superior people are 
consiu.'rably worketl up over the devel- 
opments at this point, and it is said that 
some of the directors who are on the 
boards of both the South Superior and 
West Superior Land companies are in 
hot water in consequence. 



Mr. Prentiee'8 Notice. 

In justice to Mr. Frederick Prentice, 
who is pressing his claim to an un- 
divided one-half in the Third Division 
here in the proper channel of the courts, 
it should be stated that he has at no 
time made any overtures or solicita- 
tions for the settlement of his claim byany 
ijody, being entirely content to await the 
hnal authoritative decision of the court 
of last appeal. In the face of this part, 
The Herald's head-line yesterday over a 
simple notice of his presence in the city 
in response to calls upon him, did him 
an unintentional injustice. As a busi- 
ness method of answering applications 
which have been made to him4 
w-e desired to announce simply 
that he will be at The Spalding for 
two or three days, prior to leaving for 
Aew York, where any party wishing to 
see him on business connected with the 
property, or desiring to effect a settle- 
ment, can do so. Mr. Prentice says he 
is lead to make this announcement from 
the fact that such men as Messrs. Men- 
denhall. Miller, Harrington, Peyton, 
Macfarlane, Sjjencer, Forljes, Upham, 
vy illiams. and a number of other leading 
citizens have settled, and several others 
are arranging 10 do so. It was at their 
suggestion that Mr. Prentice returned 
here again l)efore going East. The case 
which is to decide the matter will come 
up in the United States court at St. Paul 
soon. 



BURNS ' BIRT HDAY. 

The Pro|g:raiu for the .Vunuat Celebration 
ut Uuiutli. 

The r2l8t anniversary of Robert Burns 
will be tittingly celebrated by Clan 
Stewart on next Friday evening at the 
St. Louis hotel. The program will be 
found below, and speaks for itself: 

'^"'"' ;• , Kobert Burns 

Clansman Colin Thonis jn. 

f'^nsr .■ "Uxon tlie Uurn. Davie," 

Mrs. R. G. McKenzle. 

"»"<=e -■■■■■■ Hijfhland FUuir 

Prof. J. P. Moon. 

^"■*' •■; "Our Aiiopted Country" 

Clansman H. M. Hunter. 

*^°» V,V ;,-. "Selected- 
Glee Club. 
Selections on Bafirpipeg. "March of tlie Me- 
Kcuzie HiKiilainlers' and "Lord Pan- 

mnre's .March" 

. Clansmen J. S. Moon and cblnThoniBon 

T*^' • V,-. ■■■ -The Ladies" 

Clansman Robert Crombie. 
Recitation . "The Gn-at Hielau' UaKplpcs" 

Clansman Aigus Gibson. 
March to the dininjrrooin, led by Clan 
McLean. 

Chalrtnan Chief Simon Clark 

roupier Tanist W. A. ( aut 

"'essiuif Chairman, Uev. B. Mitchell 

Supper. 
Chairman's Address. 

soufr fiie».riiiii 

Waltz jionfr-"Bird on the Wing":.".' Augusto 

Mrs. Franklin Paine. 
Recitation— "To a Mouse" 

,;;•;•.•; Master Thomas Chaliiiers 

Auld Lanff Svne." 
By ihj Company. 

Looks Lilje Kevcuee. 

A case which was heard before Court 
Coramifsioner Carey last night and re- 
sulted in the binding over of the defend- 
ant to appear before the United States 
court at Winona nex'. June, has in it 
many elements which go to make up a 
persecution. The complaining witness 
looks very much liko a Frenchman, is a 
peripatetic violinist and is said to be a 
telegraph operator. He would pass for 
a white man anywhere and lives and 
dresses like one. According to the de- 
fendant, this witness was turned out of 
Jenson & Lund's saloon at Sandstone 
some time ago and threatened to "get 
even" with Mr. Lund, which he has evi- 
dently done by calling himself an Indian 
??'' ,°".^tt>'°^ Deputy United States 
Marshal Tolman of Mora that Lund had 
furnished him whisky, all of which Lund 
strenuously denies. 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— .V.ND— 

INSURANCE. 

Rooms 1 , 2, Exchange BIdg. 
DULUTH. - - MINN. 




Will continue Fifteen Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no fio-ure WE 
MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 
Our lo\r prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at Isast $15. ' 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at hast $18. ' 

The sane reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishin^r Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $£5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and 
our prices. 

M. S. BURROWS & CO. 



see 



PIONEER fOEL CO,, 



For Sale 



WKATHER FOKKCAST. 

Jan. 17. —Forecast for Duluth a»id 
vicinity for 24 hours cummencina 10a.vi. 
today: Colder weather ; snoiv. 

Observer, Signal OfBce. 



COAL 



CROSS ma lehieh, 

Ffl[[ BUi^milG, 
ANTKRACIIE i BIIUMIIIOUS. 



PORTRAITS! 



FREE! 

A LIfE-SIZE 



FORTY HCRES 



IN THE- 



Dry Maple, 

Hard Mixe<l, 

Slabs, 

KdgluifH. 




CONNELLSVILLE 
y GAS HOUSE 



ORDEBS PBOMPTLy DELIVEBED 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Loals, 326 W. Snperior St. 



EAST END 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Aven ur 
Rices Point. 



FREE! FREE! 

T GIVEN AWA! WilH EVER! PURCHASE 

OF $ I 5 OR OVER. 

Commencing Monday, JAN. I 3, and continuinE for a short 

Imcu°„t !;',T„' « I'L^"" ^"^^ !° '"'■V customer buyTng good^ 
amounting to S I 5 or over, a lile-size Portrait of himself or anv 
otl,er person whom he may wish, guaranteeing the work to Ee 

fhin'co':n\7,io"'':f^htl?^"''""'" °"^--^- -'" P™- 

Red Figure Mark -Down Sale 





/ 9 



WHOLESALE. 



SPECIAL 



-AT A- 



Bargain. 




Tefms - feiy - Advantageous. 



eHRGAINS 



RETAIL. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 

This beautiful property lies just above Oneota, and is about three-ouarters 

rots'S3x.2Tfeet°';L^'"' "^T'' '* '^P'-**^^ topographiLlly; Ta'r^e s^S 
lots, ddxi.^5 teet, the view from it sp end d" the nricf><! are. i^^a, ,.,h *u1 
tern s are the very best. So situated th'at all cil/imp'rov^Lnts mu'st e^SaicI 



¥ ' T - » 



its vilues. 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



MACfARLAlE & AUSTIN, 



WEST DULUTH. 



160 Acres in 9-49-15. 



eS^Acreage near the city 
limits at below market prices. 



ADDRESS 



80 



40 



320 



9-49-15. 



1-49-15. 



35-48- 1 5. 



48 



80 
.15. 



Water Front, 



Do Yon Want Cloaks. 

B'Hi auction sale at St. Louis' old 
ingroom, commencing Saturday at 
G p. m., and 7 to 9 p. 



din- 
2 to 



m. 



DanciuB nnd Uf|)ortiiient. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at Xo. 11.3 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents'. Tuesdays; ladies' and genta'. 
Wednesdavs, at 8 p. m. 



nr"'^^^ Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War lx)und in appropriate finishings at 
1 he Herald bindery. 



POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 

Tills powder never vanes A marve! of pur- 
it}.«ren{rth anil wholesomeness. More eoo- 
"Vni. ?l **'.^". '*>" or-lltiary kIndB. and 
..in not be sold In com petition with the miiltl- 
Uido ol low teat, short weltrlil. alum or plios- 

iSakino Powdkk tkj.. KW Wall street. N Y 



S 



Care of Herald, Duluth. 



DAVID M. 

Houghton, L. 



FORD, 

S.. Mich. 



DEALER IN 



Prepare for the grand skating carnival 
at the West End Parlor skating rink, 
Iwenty-first avenue west and Superior 
street, Friday evening, Jan. 17. Three 
good prizes to lx» given away, one for the 
hnest ladies suit, and one to the gentle- 
man with finest suit, also one to the per- 
son wearing the most comical suit. 
Come and have a good time. Walker's 
military band will furnish music. 

r. M. ERICK.SON, Proprietor. 
Capt. 8. G. Johnson, Manager. 



Lake Superior Gold, Iron and Coppef Ms 

Michigan Qoid Company's Stock a Specialty. 

"The richest miues In the world." 

CORKE.SPONUEJNCK SOLICITED. 



WHITE BEAVER'S - 

•HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL I 

T. H. SPEMCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



SCIENTIFICAMERICAN 

ESTABLISHED te<»5. 



I* the oldest and mniit popular scientific and 
mechanioul pai<er p\ihllshed and l«as the lareest 
circulation of any pit per of its claninn tbe world 
Fullj IIUii>trutcd. Boot class of Wood EncrraT. 
lOirs. I'ut,liBlied weekly, ^end for specimen 
oopy. Price »3 a year. Konr months' trial. tL 

fUUNM i, CO., PCBUSHKtus 361 Broadway, N T 
ARCHITECfslb BUILDERQ 
^ ft Edition of Scientific American. O 

fA (treat •uoeess. Each iMue contains colored 
UthoKnipliR' plutes of country and cltyresiden- 
. oes or publio bull<llni;(i. Numerous engraTlngs 
t and full |ilunf and rpecifloatlons for the use of 
t sucb as contemplate huildlnir. Price t3-&U a year, 
Kots.acopy. MUNN t, CO., Pcbubhuu). 

may be secnr> 
ed by apply- 
InK to Mt'NN 
k. Co., who 
hari- had orer 
4U ycnrs' experience and haTS made oyer 
KlO.UlU applications for American and For- 
£^ — einn pstontK. ^end for Handbook. Corr«». 
~ P0D<l«ace strictly conDdential. 

TRADE MARKS. 

' In ease your mark is not reeislered In the Pat- 
ant OIBi'e, apply lo Mf.v.N * Co., and procure 
Immediate protection. Send for Uandbook. 
COPYRKJIITS for books, charts, mapa, 
0., quickly procured. Addraaa 

BIO^N 4c CO.. Patent Sallelten. 
QmmuLL ovnoa; n Bboaswat, it. T 



2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
v^ell, West Duluth, $ I 750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $ I I 80. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $2000. 



DULUTH 



Mortgage Sale. 



Default having been made In the payment 
ofthe6umof throe hundred and siitv oO-KH) 
doi lar 3, (»*iti 60-l(Xl! princi i.al and int<?rest which 
is claimed to be due ut the date of this notleo 
upon a certain mort«:a^> duly o.vecuted and 
dtli\ertd by Irank Doyle.a l)ache!or,to Jam s 
B. Hovardaud Alexander H. Davis, beaiinir 
date t ic tenth day of November, A. D ltW!< 
anddiily recorded in the office of the register 
of dec Js In and for the county of Saint Liuls 
andstitc of Minnesota, on the 1:.', h day of 
Novetiber A. D. IKv*. at 9 ocloeli a. m.. in 
book '36" of mortiragres, on page 2fi2; and no 
action or proceediusrai law or otherwit'e hav- 
ing: been institutcHi to recover tlie debt se- 
cured by said mortgrajre. or any i)art thereof: 

Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
bj' vir ue of a fxjwer of sale contained in said 
mortfJTijrt. and pursuant to the statute in such 
cascnade and provided, the said mortg-ajre 
will bt foreclosed, and the premises described 
in and covered by saiu mortfrajre. viz: Lots 
numlM red six (ti). seven (7) and eijfht (8i and 
the no -theast quarter (neV4) of the soutlieast 
quarier (seii) of section numbered twcutv-two 
(22), all In ■ 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

IB the largest in the State Df Mlc «esot« on (idfl 
of the Twir Cltlei, 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



f 



Northern Piscific Short Une. 

DnLUTH TO SUPERIOR. 



I.eave 
Duluth 



Leave \ Arrive 
W. sup'r Superior 



Kxeept Sunday.. 
Except Sunday. . 
Kxeept Sunday.. 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . 

Daily . 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday. 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally. . . 



Terms on Houses, \A Casti, Balance 
U and 3 rears at 8 Percent. 



In township No. sixty-one (til) north of 
range Vo. twelve (12) west of tlie fourth (4fb) 
principal meridian, in St. Louis county, and 
state o f .Minnesota, with the heredilaments and 
appiirleiiances, will lie sold at public auction, 
to the 1 lighest bidder for cash, to pav said debt 

RudiutL-rest.and thetaxesdf anviousaidprem- ^ - „ 

Ises, >.t d twenty-five doliurs. aitorueys fees, i gj«^ Pt Sunday 
as stipulated in and l)y said morlgiigo In case 
of fore "losure, and the disbuisements allowed 
bylMw which sale willoe made by the sheriff 
of said St. Louis county, at the front door of 
the cot rt house, in the city of Duluth. in said 
county and state, on the 2yth dav 
of January, A. D. ISlO, at 10:3(i o'clock a. m on 
that da >-, subject to redemption at any time 
wlthiooneyear from theday of sale, as pro- 
vided b >■ law. 
Datoc December 13th, A. D. lK«t. 

JA.VES B. Howard, 
and 
_ -^ „ Alexander H. Davis, 

K. N. M4RBt.E, Mortgairees 

Attorney. 
Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-1M8-25. 



6 9) ami 

T So am I 

"55 am| 

10(10 am, 

II *"> am! 

1 10 pm 

2 15 pm 

3 35 pm 
3:«pi]) 

4 00 pni| 
4% pm 
6 40 pm 

6 45 pm 

7 15 pm 
fl28 pm 

11 10 pm 



6 45 am 
T 65 am 
9 10 am 

10 15 am 

11 50 am 
1 2.S pm 
SS-Jpm 
3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 

4 50 pm 

5 55 pm 
• 00 pm 
T 30 pm 
S*46pm 

112Tpm 



652 am 
8 (12 am 
ClTam 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 
136 pm 
aS7 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 % pm 
4 .57 pm 
UU2 pm 
7 07 pm 




115 3 pm 



SUPERIOR TO DULUTH. 



I Leave Leave ' 
iSui>erlor W. Sup'r; 




N]tice to Contractors. 



H, P, MILLS 



I 



.Uio m 411 FIRST NmiomiL eniiK boiloing, 



Sealed proposals will be received at the of- 
noeof tie undersigned until the 25th day of 
••jnu'irj, \m, for the erection and ctjnipletlon 
or lot) (ivelliiig houses, more or less, at West 
Duluth, Miun, for the .Minncsom Iron (ar 
compan;', acc-ordingto plans and speclflcttlons 
prepared by the undersigned and now on file 
*t'ii8oflice. Each contractor estimating on 
this wor t win be required to submit with' his 
proposal, a proi)erly executiKl bond of two 
responsi jle suivties In the sum of *.">00 as a 
guarantie that in case thecontrac-t Isawarded 
lie will nithina reasonable time execute a con- 
tract anc l)ond satisfactory to the owners 

The owners reserve the right to reject any 
or all bids. - j 

O. G. Trapuaoen, 

Rooms 510, 511, 513 and 613 First Nat'lonal'^i^i'ik 
building, Duluth, Hion. 



Dally 

Except Sunday. . 
Dally 

Kxeept Sunday.. 
Kxeept Sunday... 

Dail)-..... ■'..., 

Dally 

Daily 

ExcejU Sunday . . . 

Dailv 

Daily 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Suntiay... 

Daily 

Kxeept Sunday. .. 



700 am 

"mo am 
t«25am 

10 4.'i am 

11 0.5 am 

12 i5 pm 

1 4.5 pm 

2 5ti pm 
4 06 pm 
6 05 pm 



610 pm 

7 31) pml 

11 45 pmi 



6 45 am 

7 07 am 

7 40 am 

8 17 am 
9.32 am 

10 i» am 

11 15 am 

12 42 pm 

1 62 pm 

3 00 pm 

4 15 pm 
6 12 pm 
6 10 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 ;*) pm 
11 52 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 06 am 
723 am 
7 55 am 
S35am 
9 4Mam 
11 10 am 
1130 am 
100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 15 pm 

4 31) pm 

5 30 pm 

6 25piD 

6 36 pm 

7 46pn. 
1210 am 



( 



rtheru PaclHc Kallroad. 




Dining Ciii-s on Pacific 
Express Trains. 



Leave Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 
I Daily. I DaUy 



3.ao pin;6.26 pm 



Pacific Express (limltetl) for 

Fargo, Helena, Uutfe, Tar 

coma. Seattle and Portland.1 

Granu Forks, Grafton, Win^i 

nl|>eg : 

Dakota Express, for f^reiiRl 

FaUs. N'^ahj^ton, ^2S!| 

Jamestown and intermediate! 

points -^yxxa,ve> _ - - - 

Chicago Exprt?9s, for Aihland I ' ^"l '* *" 

Milwauljee Chicago and all' 

Wisconsin Central and Mil-I 
waukeo. I>ake 8hor« & West- 



ern points. 



14.00 pm 



io.aaftB 



JNO. C HOBlNSON, 
Ti<*et A«ent. Union Depot. 



.■^ 



« q * » « waa«Amj-a. ; 



l lfc i JUJII 



1 



I « ■ 



r 



■?r*- 



• t"» ' j - 



■ r S K • ! 9M W. 






, 


Near 

E. 


ACRES 

Short Line Park on railroad. 

C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 ^est Superior Street. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 




FOK BARGAINS 



E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior 8tr«et. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDtNQ. 



VOL. 7; NO. 246. 



DULUTH, MINN., SATTJBDAY, JANUABY 18, 1890— SIX PAGES. 



Do Kou Want to Bomw Mooey? 



We can let you have it and without delay. 

MONEY ON HAND 

Provided you have sufficient security. 



LAST [D 




NEWS FROM WASHINGTON 



Our Bates are the Lowest OWaioalile ! 



Funeral Services of Walker 

Blaine Held This 

Morning. 



Bill 


is 


Introd 


need 


Today 


for 


th 


e Fair 
Louis. 


for 


St. 



m «i^ 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 

DULUTH, WEST DULUTH OH WEST SUPEBIOB 

Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



The Baltimore Shows Over a 
Thousand Extra Horse- 
power. 



LIIBGE - OR - SILL - 




We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 

SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 




r 



\ 



Real [state, Acies and Business Pfopeity a Specialty. 

Call and see what we have. 



• til 



FIRE 



INSURANCE. 



I! 



The best Foreign and American Companies rep 
resented. Policies correctly written. 



'— i-^ 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



Apples I Apples I Apples 



Washington, Jan. 18.— The funeral of 
Walker Blaine took place this morning. 
The day was bright and the air cool. A 
large number of friends of the Blaine 
family, members of the diplomatic corps 
and people in oflicial life, attendetl the 
funeral. 

A private funeral ceremony was held 
at the home of Secretary Blaine on La- 
fayette square at 10:30 a. m. The Presi- 
dent and Mrs. Harrison, all the members 
of the cabinet, E. W. Halford, several 
meml>er8 of the diplomatic corps and 
some intimate friends of the family at- 
tended these services, which were con- 
ducted by Rev. Dr. Hamlin, pastor of the 
Church of the Covenant. At the con- 
clusion of the private services, the re- 
mains were taken to the Church of the 
Covenant, followed by the family and 
friends in carriiiges. 

Regular services were held at the 
church. Rev. Dr. Hamlin officiating. The 
attendance at the church was very large, 
and many were unable to gain an en- 
trance Ijecause of the crowd. Prominent 
in the throng were President and Mrs. 
Harrison, V^ice-President and Mrs. Mor- 
ton, cabinet and ladies, justices, members 
of the diplomatic corps, delegates to the 
Pan-American congress and the marine 
conference and senators and representa- 
tives. 

The members of the Blaine household 
occupied seats directly in front of the 
pulpit on the right of the main ai.sle. 
and the seats opposite were occupied by 
the President and cabinet and the pall- 
bearers. 

A special meeting of the senate com- 
mittee on Pacific railroads was held this 
morning to listen to an argument by 
Collins P. Huntington on the Pacific 
railroad funding bill, but was postponed 
to some day next week. 

The house met at 1 o'clock today. Mr. 
Grank of Missouri introduced a bill 
locating the Wtirld's fair at St. Lotiis 
and creating a corporation to carry it on. 
Referred to special committee. On 
motion of Mason of Illinois a resolution 
was adopted permitting the special com- 
mittee investigating the ballot box 
forger}' to sit during sessions of the 
house. 



GOOD GR IP ON JUDGES. 

Indignation thattliv Uulten Kngrlisli Peer, 
age Still ContrvlH the Judiciary, 

New Y'ork, Jan. 18.— A London cable 
says: "The conviction of Editor Parks 
OD the charge of libelling Earl Ruston 
in connection with the Cleveland street 
scandal and his sentence to twelve 
months imprisonment has aroused the 
greatest indignation among the working 
classes throughout the country. It is 
regarded as an indication that the aris- 
tocracy has still a good grip on the judic- 
iary and as another exemplittcation of 
the fact that blue blood is a cloak be- 
hind which the members of the upper 
ten can shelter themselves from their 
misdeeds, no matter how vile these may 
be. 

Arrangements hbve already been made 
for a number of mans meetings in differ 
ent parts of the country to denounce the 
verdict in general and Justice Hawkins' 
summing up in particular. 

In journalistic circles there is consid- 
erable sympathy with the convicted edi- 
tor, although it is noticeable that the 
same Tory journals that denounced the 
outcome of the Cronin trial are exultant 
over the "vindication" that the now no- 
torious peer has secured through the 
medium of this disgraceful outcome of 
the trial. 



TO FAVOR ANNEXATION. 



DISTRICT COURT. 






PBICS THKEIE CENTS. 



Conrt Notes 



Montreal Statesmen to Openly 

Favor Annexation in 

Canada. 



The Result of a Late Trip 
Duluth and the North- 
v.est. 



to 



New Style, High Speed 
Engine Causes a Very 
Bad Wreck. 



THAT 
A Good 



QUEER FAILURE. 



Deal of Wealtli That Cau't Ue 
Accounted For. 

Chicago, Jan. 18.— Before Master in 
Chancery Sherman today, and under the 
direction of the United States circuit 
court an enquiry was commenced into 
the circumstances surrounding the re- 
cent failure of the Meade-Van Bokkelen 
company, extensive dealers in California 
fruit, wines, etc., which occurred some 
months ago, with liabilities of $.'}00,000. 

Creditors to the extent of 1165,000 
who had been left insecured initiated an 
investigation and found but 370,000 of 
tangible assets, of which $05,000 was in 
bills receivable, the majority being 
worthless. It was also found that a 
deficit of $200,000 existed, and it is 
claimed that nearly one-half of this sum 
was squandered on the board of trade. 

An item of $21,000 appears on the 
books for wine given to saUxsn-keepers 
to tKXjm a certain brand, whereas in the 
other books an entry of four cases only 
can be found. These are the facts upon 
which the present enquiry is based, and 
interesting developments are expected. 



THE •49ERS. 



For a 



The Brave Old Piuueers Awiemble 
Commemorative Banquet, 

Chicaoo, Jan. IS.—It is forty-two 
years ago today since the first discovery 
of gold in California, and the event is to 
be celebrated this afternoon by a ban- 
quet at the Grand Pacific hotel under 
the auspices of the Western Associ- 
ation of California Pioneers. 

Veteran gold seekers from a dozen 
states west of Xew England will be 
present and tell the story of their trials 
and tribulations while crossing the 
plains. It is also proposed to publish a 
biographical volume containing sketches 
of each member of the society, which 
will form a valuable addition to the his- 
tory of the forty-niners. 



MoNTRE.\L, Jai. 18.— {Special.]— M. 
Mercier's most iiitimate friends say he 
intenils openly tH'pousing annexation as 
oppo8«»d to imj)erial federation, which is 
being championed by Sir John McDon- 
ald, Sir Hector Laugevin and the conser- 
vative leaders. 

Mr. Perrault's open letter to the 
premier, it is i»aid, was inspired by 
Mayor Mercier. Another rumor says 
thatLaurier, the French-Canadian leader 
of the opix>8itiou in the Dominion par- 
liament, and an intimate friend of Mer- 
cier, will strongly champion commercial 
union at tliiHse8si<>n,and that thispolicv 
is in sympathy with the Mercier move- 
ment here. 

These are no sensational stories but 
the sober convictions of manv influential 
French-Canadians. 

"I do not believe," said the Hon. Mr. 
LaFIamme, ex-minister of justice, "that 
annexation will become a serious politi- 
cal factor until Sir John dies, but just as 
soon as he does, that will become the 
burning issue. In the meantime the 
French-Canadian liberals are beginning 
to set the agitatioii in moticm." 

IT CHANGED THEIR VIEWS. 



» I «»' 



i 



FANCY SELECTED STOCK. 



8ELLEFL0WEBS, SPITZENBURGS, 



BOSSETS, NOBTHEmi SP!S, 



The actual horse power performance 
of the new cruiser Baltimore on her re- 
cent trial trip was today made known by 
promulgation from the na\-j- department 
of figures reix)rted by the trial board. 
The aggregate intlicated horse {Kjwer 
developed was 10,00:1.41. This gives the 
Cramps a power i)remium of 8100,441.80, 
being for excess over 9000 stipulated for 
in the contract at the rate of $100 a 
horse power. 

Unhappy Result of Tratilug Wives. 
Indianapous, Ind., Jan. 18. — A story 
of extraordinary marital experience is 
related in a suit for damages for $5000 
filed in court here today by .\ugust 
Richter, a street contractor, against 
James J. Twiname of New York for 
alienating the afiFections of his wife. Six 
years ago Richter traded wives with Dr. 
A. J. Baumille, giving $100 as a consider- 
ation, as alleged in a damage suit that 
has been pending in court for some 
time. Two years ago he procured a 
divorce from the new wife, and in the 
complaint just tiled he charges his 
troubles to the man who was his part- 
ner's brother. 



FEELING AGAINST A BULLY. 



The PortugueRe People Have 8and if the 
Government Hasn't. 

Lisbon, Jan. 18.- -Crowds of people as- 
sembled in the streets last night and 
shouted, "Vivi Portugal," and "Down 
with England." Similar scenes were en- 
acted in many provincial towns. The 
Lisbon correspondent of The London 
Times says: 

The Duke of Palmella, the captain of 
the King's guard, who recently rsturued 
to the British legation a medal received 
by him while in the British service, has 
also dismissed all his English servants. 
The duke, however, still keeps his for- 
tune invested in British consfjls. A vig- 
ilance committee has Ijeen formed in 
Lisbon for the purpose of denouncing 
the receivers of English goods for sale. 



of 




Baffels to Select From 



All in first-class condKion, 




Call and order a barrel, as prices will shortly 

be much higher. 



PRESENT PRICES, $3.25 TO $375 PEB BARBEL 



t 



> « ■■ ' ■ 



SIMON CLARK, 

Metropolitan Grocery Store, 
I 13 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULJJTH. 



Where Germanx are Level Headed. 

BEKLtN, Jan. 18.— The committee 
the reichstag, to which was referred a 
bill granting a subsidy to the East Afri- 
can Steamship company, has approved 
the measure, with the provision that the 
steamers shall call at Dutch or Belgian 
ports. In the event of there being a 
permanent increase in profits of the line, 
the government will either reduce the 
subsidy or call for more frequent service. 

West WaiU. 

Chicago, Jan. 18.— A motion for a new 
trial for ex-editor James G. West, under 
sentence of five years for over issuing 
stock of the Chicago Times, was set for 
hearing before Judge Grinnell in crim- 
inal court this morning, but owing to 
the illness of assistant states attorney 
Elliot, the argument had to go over un- 
til next week. 

Killed by a Railway Wreck, 
Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 18. — A wreck oc- 
curred on the Georgia Pacific railroad 
near Birmingham, Ala., this morning. 
Engineer William Derry was killed and 
several other persons were seriously and 
perhaps fatally injured. 

Died From Blast Furnace Kxplogion. 

Chicago, Jan. 18. — John Johnson, one 
of the men injured in the furnace explo- 
sion yesterday afternoon at South Chi- 
cago, died this morning. He was badly 
burned about the face and upper portion 
of the body. 

Emin DoeHa't Improve. 

Zanzibar, Jan. 18. — There is no im- 
provement in the condition of Emin 
Pasha, who recently suffered a relapse 
after his partial recovery from the effects 
of a fall fr om a balcony at Ba gamoye. 
To Kearm Kusaian Troopn. 

St. Petersbirg, Jan. 18.— The Czar 
haa appointed two commissions to adopt 
measures for rearming the troops. Gen. 
Vannovski, the minister of war will pre- 
side over one. 



LrvEKPOOL, June 18. — The Portugal 
government anticipates a favorable reply 
to its note to the powers asking their in- 
tervention in the dispute between Portu- 
gal and Great Britain concerning certain 
territory in Africa. 

FROM J AIL TO SHOW. 

John Kanze, the Cronin Convict, Released 
on $15,000 Bail. 

Chicago, Jan. 18. — John Kunze, who 
was among the four men found guilty of 
the murder of Dr. Cronin, and whose 
punishment the jury fixed at three years 
in the penitentiary, is a free man again. 

Judge McConnell granted him a new 
trial a few days ago and he was admitted 
to bail in the sum of $15,000. This was 
furnished today by a dime museum man- 
ager who signed John Kunze's bond and 
the little German in return for the favor 
will appear on exhibition at his museum. 
It is likely that Kunze will not be prose- 
cuted again. 



The Late Trip Throut.. the States Had a 
Broatleniiii; lulluence. 

Messrs. Mercier and Perrault were 
among the Montreal excursionists who 
visited Duluth last December as the 
guests of the city. While here they ex- 
pressed themselves as strongly in favor 
of ultimate annexation to the United 
States. " We have always, " 

they said, "been in fa\or 

of reciprocity with the United States. 
Our party has made it a point to bring 
up in parliamenfca bill favoring close re- 
lations with the United States. Of 
course the bills are defeated, but then, 
it serves its purpose in educating the 
people on the questions at issue, and it 
IS serving a pui-i)o8e in bringing to our 
views more people each year. What we 
liave seen in Duluth and on one excur- 
sion only make- u.^ the mors zealous and 
firm m our determination to bring the 
United States and Canada under one 
flag. We may not see the day, but the 
good we are able to do now will bring 
about the event in a coming generation. 
Said another of the party, a newspaper 
man: "Vou will scion see, after we get 
back to Montrep.I. how this trip will bear 
fruit, and mar- will Ije annexationists or 
advocates of commercial union who have 
not been before." 

A "STRONCrTocOMOTIVE. 
A ^ery Bad Accident at Cincinnati Last 



A CurlouH Saloon CaM» Today 
of Cases. 
Yesterday afternoon Herman E. Long 
recovered a verdict of $500 in his drain- 
age suit against the Duluth Terminal 
railway, and Francis D. West recovered 
a $250 verdict for the same defendant. 
A thirty day stay of proceedings in each 
case was granted the defendants. .\ 
jury was empanelled in case 14(5 and the 
court adjourned. 

This morning Gustaf H. Toffte vs. 
Paul Sharvy, iis sheriff, came up ami 
excited considerable interest from its 
peculiar intricacies and the absence of a 
material witness. A. Swenson ran a 
saloon at 113 East Superior street and 
business was not very brisk ordinarily, 
but one day Paul Sheridan, a new comer, 
happened in when the saloon was 
crowded and spoke to Swenson about 
buying the business. It was agreed 
that Sheridan should visit the saloon 
daily and size up the amount of business. 
Swenson then procured a gang 
of men, giving them various 
amounts of money to spend in iiis 
saloon while Sheridan was there, and 
when the intending purchaser was pres- 
ent a rushing business was curried on, 
the sham customers almost tumbling 
over each other in their anxiety to get 
to the bar. A couple of exhibitions of 
this kind caught Sheridan and he 
planked down the money. A few weeks 
showed the new proprietor that the 
rushing business was a hollow mockery 
and that the saloon had but few cus- 
tomers except those who were chronic 
staud-otfs and sijongers. He became 
■filled with remorse and considerable 
whisky, so he gave the entire outfit to 
his bartender, G. H. Tuffte, to secure an 
alleged debt, taking a chattel mortgage 
for the balance, and skipped. J. C. Os- 
wald & Co. of Minneapolis had an 
account against Sheridan, and believing 
the transfer from Sheridan was given to 
defraud, attached the stock to satisfy 
their claim, whereupon Tuffte brought 
suit against the sheriff to recover $1000 
alleged damages. The jury returned a 
verdict for the plaintiff. 

The next case was that of Diedrich 
Bros. vs. the County Commissioners, who 
were a.leged trespassers on the plaintiffs' 
property in the Hermantown district. 
The eitse went to the jury about 4 
o'chxjk. 

County Attorney Sherwood introiluced 
ex -Judge James Si>encer to Judge 
Stearns, who immediately issued an 
order for his admission' to practice. 
Judge Spencers' i)ai)er8 are among the 
strongest ever presented to this court. 

Before Judge Ensign the marital mis- 
fit case of Cramer vs. Cramer was called, 
but was ixwtponed until Jan. 31 on ac- 
c<3unt of the illness of the defendant. In 
the application of Erickson & Larson 
for the appointment of a receiver for 
the J. F. Erickson stock of goods, the 
court took the matter under advisement. 
Cases 132 and 137 were consolidated and 
will be tried Feb. 13. 



DOCTORS AT WAR. 



Between 



THAT RATE WAR. 
The Burlin^on, Thoagrh Beaten, 



A Murder Caused by a Fuss 
I'hysicians and Girls. 

Louis ,'iLT.E, Ky., Jan. 18. -Two coun- 
try doctors, one county judge, his pretty 
daughte •, his «nB-in-law, and a nephew 
of one ot the dbdtors are actors in what 
may pro'e a tragedy at New Castle, Ky. 

Victor Bond, son-in law of Judge John 
S. Bruce, is lying at the point of death 
by a blow dealt by Mac Oldham, who 
was for years Judge Bruce's family 
physician, Oldham and Bruce quar- 
reled soDie years ago for some reasfm 
which caunot l>e learned and Oldham 

has opposed Bruce politically. But the ,■ rates aft«r'T«n -tt , „ „ k„o;» t ->.>., 
young people hnvel^en friends. Last ^It^^ulAZl '^''^^'''''^" 
ThuTsdBy Miss Bcitie Bruce left a note 



a 

with her tai^her-ih-luw, Bond, for Mao 
01dham.;i^is note was not delivered, 
but fell i ito Judge Bruce's hands. Mac 
Oldham, by this, missed meeting thiee 
young ladies whom he was to drive to a 
party, an ong whom was Miss Bruce. 

Becausa of this Oldham met Bond on 
the street soon and, after a few words, 
struck hi ji a heavy blow with a burgio"" 
instrument. Bond was taken h6iu», 
almost lifeless, and Oldham has fled. 
Dr. Sam. Oldham claims that the trouble 
and fight are part of a conspiracy to 
break up his practice, and that Bruce's 
present p lysician. Dr. McGinnis, is at 
the botton of it. 



Litiuor Into Africa. 

LoNDOir, Jan. 18.— At the reassem- 
bling of the anti-siavery congress at 
Brussels today, it was announced that 
the powers had agreed not f^ enter into 
the discu* slop of the territorial claims in 
Africa, bjt to confine themselves to 
measures for the mitigation of the 
evil of the slave trade. Germany will 
resist the proposal to stop the importa- 
tion of spirits into Africa. 



For acrts adjoininj^ii/ftkeside and Les- 
ter Parks se E. W. Markell. Hotel St. 
Louis block, ground floor. 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Boom D, Hunter 
block. 



Children's Garments 

At auction in the St. Louis old dinmg- 
room. Sa es from 2 to 6 p. m. and V to 9 
p. m. 



Very 
Disturbing: Factor. 

The Burlington & Northern signally 
failed to make a pro rata agreement 
with any Chicago road, and must there- 
fore give up the rate fight bo far as 
Eastern business is concerned. But 
this by no means ends the rate war, for 
General Passenger Agent Kenyon said 
that he would keep rates down between 
St. Paul and Chicago until the rights of 
his road were recognized. Because of 
the agreement of the Chicago lines the 
Zenith City Short Line will increase its 

first 
. „ second class to Boston, 

via Mackinaw city and the Soo. The 
Soo road will also put a like rate into 
effect from St. Paul. 

Said a Chicago railroad man in the 
city this morning: "One reason tor the 
quiet m railroad circles, especially among 
those roads engaged in the rate war, is 
the great falling off in travel in the last 
two weeks. The new year always starts 
Ui with an enormous passenger traffic, 
out after the first week in Januarj' busi- 
ness took a slack, and since then' there 
has been comparatively nothing doing 
except locally. I expect business to 
brighten up again within the month, 
and then another change towards lower 
rates will take place, if the Burlington 
sticks in it a determ ination." 

A Thouifhtful Act, 

The following letter, which explains 
itself, has just been received by Rev C C 
Salter of the Bethel: 
To the Rev. C. C. Salter: 

On behalf of the officers and members 
of the Duluth Minstrel club, I am afford- 
ed very great pleasure in enclosing here- 
with the treasurer's check for the sum 
of $50, to be used at your discretion in 
the interests of your splendid institution, 
"the Bethel," and with it the club's 
hearty good will and best wishes for the 
Bethel's future. This sum, I may ex- 
plain is the surplus in the treasury at 
this date, and we all agree that it could 
be put to no better purpose. 

I have the honor to be, yours very truly, 
Duncan MAcuiOD, President. 

Children's Garnaents 

At auction in the St Louis old dining- 
room. Sale from 2 to 6 p. m. and 7 to 9 
p. m. 



BAD AS EVER. 



An Kniperor to Abdicate. 

Parls, Jan. 18.— Le Xix Siecle says the 
emperor of Austria will soon abdicate 
hia throne. 

A Hard Place for Aldermen. 
PiTTSBUKU, Jan. 18. — Alderman W. H. 
Porter, convicted of conspiracy and 
blackmail, was sentenced today to eigh- 
teen months in penitentiary and to pay 
$500 fine. Constable Shepard, found 
guilty of the same offense, was sentenced 
to fifteen months in workhouse. 



Qneer Brotherly Love. 

South Bend, Ind., Jan. 18.— Thursday 
evening at Mishawaka, four miles from 
here, Lewis Noel tried to muder his 
brother Jake Noel. The two had re- 
sided together for years. Itecentlv Jake 
was married, and his separation affected 
Lewis so much that he determined to 
kill his brother and himself. When Jake 
visited him Thursday eveing, Lewis shot 
but did not injure him. Jake ran away, 
and Lewis then went to a neighbor's and 
demanded entrance, but met with a re- 
buff accompanied by the contents of a 
shot gun. He was afterwards jailed. 

Red-Uottilrou Cxplodes. 

Newcaistle, Pa., Jan. 18.— An explo- 
sion occurred at the Etna Rolling mill 
last night, in which throe men were ter- 
ribly burned. One of the buggies con 
taming a ball of red-hot iron upset in a 
puddle of water. The moment the 
molten iron touched the water an ex- 
plosion occurred, throwing huge chunks 
of iron about the mill and burning Geo. 
E. Cox severely about the waist, chest 
and neck. William Duver and Richard 
Waltenwaugh were also seriously burned. 
Cox will probably die, but the other two 
will recover. 



Kllrain-Va(|uelin Postponed. 
New Orleans, Jan. 18.— The much 
talked of glove contest between Jake 
Kilrain and Felix Vaquelin for a purse 
of $'2000, six rounds, and which was to 
have taken place tomorrow has l)een 
postjioned until next month in conse- 
quence of the fact that the municipal 
law forbids such contests in the city lim- 
its. It is thought that this ordinance 
will be repealed or amended at an earlv 
date. ^ 

All Their Children Gone. 

Faij. River, Mass., Jan. 18.— The fifth 
and last of the children of William and 
Mary Boyle died late yesterday after- 
noon from pneumonia, superinduced by 
the grip. Four of these Bf)yle children 
were buried on Thursday last. 

A French Ambassador, Too. 

Rome, Jan. 18.— M. Mariana, the 
French ambassador to this country, died 
today from pneumonia. , 



Bvening. 

Cincinnati, 18.— Tlie list of the killed 
in the accident in Spring Grove ceme- 
terj' last night was correct with a single 
exception. Wliat was then thought to 
be the unidentified body of a woman 
has since been found to be the body of 
Charles Kellar of Winton Place. Mr. 
Kellar and Mr. Wilson were the only 
passengers who boarded the ill-fated 
train at Winton Place. Mr. Kellar was 
going to Cummingsville, barelv a five- 
miuutes ride, to settle some business 
matter. Mr. Wilson was a 32-degree 
mason and was going to Cincinnati to 
attend a meeting of his lodge. Both 
were in the rear car and were probably 
killed by the collision. The engine of the 
rear train which ran into the accommoda- 
tion is known as a Strong engine, end of 
the new design which has been patented 
by Mr. Strong, the inventor, and which 
is expected to draw trains easily at from 
sixty to seventy miles an hour. A com- 
pany to establish a manufactory of these 
engines is in process of formation. Thg 
engine is the only one of the kind in use 
on the road and it recently brought a 
heavy train from Hamilton, twenty-five 
miles away in thirty minutes. 

The engineer of that engine, Coakley, 
did not see the light of the rear car of 
the accommodation before him until he 
was almost on it, and it is not sure even 
then that he fully realized the nearness 
of the coming train. Still he appplied 
the air brakes and reversed his engine 
and remained with it until the crash 
came, and then jumped for his life. 
When found a few minutes afterwards 
by a man who ran down from Winton 
Place, Coakley was leaning against a 
picket fence alongside the track, his face 
covere<l with bkxxl. He appeared to be 
in a dazed condition and asked what was 
the matter. When he became entirely 
conscious, he said he found it imix)8sibje 
to check the tremendous 8i)eed of his 
train on the down grade, but had used 
every effort to do so before he left the 
engine. 

Superintendent Neilson, in explaining 
the cause of the accident, says the fact 
that the Glendale accommodation was 
twelve minutes behind time, had no 
bearing. The real cause was that the 
operator at Carthage, where train No. 31 
entered the block in which the accident 
occurred, did not show a signal that 
would tell the engineer the block was 
not clear. The accident occurred when 
the vestibule train from Chicago on the 
Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton railroad 
ran into the Glendale accommodation at 
Chicago Hill junction. 



Tlie Water Supply Does Not Improve: Em- 
ployes Ai-e Hustling. 

The water supply was in the usual 
unsatisfactory c-ondition this morning. 
From 7 o'clock till late in the afternixjn 
the pressure fluctuated between thirtv 
and fifty pounds, not sufficient head to 
carry the water to some parte of Second 
street. In justice to the Water com- 
pany's employes it may be said that they 
are making every effort to repair the 
breaks as fast as they occur. A special 
providence seems to be watching over 
Duluth. Should a fire break out in the 
business portion, there would be a strong 
Tx>S8ibility of great loss, with the water 
• upply in itspresent state. 

A .Suit Over Briclc. 

B. F. Shanley has been subptcnaed as 
a witness in a civil case in which several 
Duluth parties are interested. Last 
summer a large quantity of Shaska brick 
— something over a million, was shipped 
by Burrows, a St. Paul contractor, to D. 
H. Hayes for the Chamber of Ctim- 
merce building. Mr. Shanley con- 
demned about 175,000 of the brick, 
as a large percentage of the brick were 
utterly worthless. He gave Burrows 
the privilege of having the brick sorted. 
This was not done, however. Bur- 
rows sold the brick to other parties 
at a sacrifice and now sues Hayes for 
the balance. George Giles has also been 
subpoenaed in the case. 

TELEGRA-H BRIEFS. 



Large and Stflisfi Stock 



OF- 



CLOAKS 



-AND- 



TO BE SQLD AT 



en- 
saw 



BACK BAY IN oanGER. 

A Wealthy Quarter of the Hub Likely to 

be Forsalcen. 

Boston, Jan. 18.- The startling state- 
ment is made toniglit, and is apparently 
supported by facts, that the opulent 
residence quarter of Boston known as 
the Back Bay is in imminent danger of 
being forsaken by its wealth v inhabit- 
ants. 

The fact seems to be, in brief, that 
since the new intercepting sewer was 
constructed four years ago the under- 
ground water level has been lowered a 
foot, thus exposing for that distance 
the piles upon which every structure 
rests. In numerous instances serious 
decay has set in, and already several 
buildings have been supplied with new 
foundations. It is predicted that when 
the true state of affairs becomes known 
there will be a hegira. 



1 



The action of O'Shea against Parnell, 
which no one doubts is a purely political 
move, has proved to be a veritable boom- 
etang. 

The water is ten feet above the danger 
line at Mount Carmel above Cairo and 
the lower part of the city on the river 
bank is flooded so that business is 
tirely suspended, factories and 
mills being compelled to close down 

The new sheriff of Denver, Mr. Bar- 
ton, has ordered all saloons closeil Sun- 
days. The law heretofore on this point 
has been a deail letter. 

Last night a very destructive fire oc- 
curred at .\itkin, burning four business 
places of the the town. The losers are: 
J. N. Marr, two buildings and cloth- 
ing stock; Y'oung & Co., grocery 
stock; H. W. Stodie, building; Ed Stev- 
ens, restaurant stock; J. J. McDonald, 
building and liquor stock. Loss, $'20,- 
000; insurance, $11,000. 

The dry goods house of Huber & Co., 
Le Seuer, Minn., was completely gutted 
by fire last night, with a total loss of the 
stock. Loss, $14,'2()0; insured for S13,(XX). 
The Argentine Republic has formally 
recognized the newly established repub- 
lic of Brazil, in a lengthy decree just 
published. 

It is reported that queen Victoria is 
seriously ill at Osborne with influenza. 
Much anxiety is felt as she has not been 
well for some weeks past. 

Blast furnace No. 4 of the lUinois 
Steel company's works at South Chi- 
cago burst yesterday evening, resulting 
in the death of one man and the serious 
injury of four others. 

The White Stocking team of the 
Players' league was completed by the 
signing of Comiskey. A lease for new 
grounds has also been signed. 

REA L EST ATE. 

A Record of the R«.-.l instate Transfers for 
24 Hours, finding; at Noon. 

AntruB R Macfarlane to Anjrus J Mac- 
farlttue, lot 13. Idcx-k 21, Mucfiirlaues 
Grassy I'oint udditioa to Duiutli t 

Jobn Flyuu to Jolm >'raser, lots 3, 4, 6 
and «, bloci 7, Hall addition to One- 
ota 

A L X^nm-liler to Suinuol a Waiiiank, 
lot 1. block If, Wttlbunks addition to 
Duluth 

West Dulutb Land coinpauy to Petoi- 
Carlson, lot 12, block M2, W est Du- 
lutn. Fifth division 

U U Parsons to Pit< r Patterson, lots 1 
and a, block 43, Kimberley Si Stryk- 
er'8 addition to Duluth 

West Duluth Luud company to Btinja- 
niln F iNetr, iotfl, bloc-li 1(11, West Du- 
luth, Fifth division - 

Louis Gouvon to Porter B Coolido'e 
u!, of nw!4, secUonS. s'/i of swk, 4- 
89-19 .... 

Mianesola Iron company to Jo>-epb 
Cass, w'/i of lots, bi(x.-k 14, town of 
Tower 

8 S Walliank to 6ma"s ir^ngeiiier, lot i. 
block 18, Walbanks addition to Du- 
luth 

J D Kay to Ella M Shr.'s er. lote 11 and 
1*, block 95, Portland division 2. 800 

10 transfers; total lO.aiO 



AUCTION ! 



IN THE OLD DININGROOM, 



Hotel St. Louis 



COMMENCING 



SATURDAY, JAN. 18, 



At 2 to 6 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M. 



J. M. BECKMAN 



85U 



2,903 



AUCTIONEER. 



REAL ESTATE. 



Special Bargains 1 Snaps. 



flOO 



eoo 



460 



oco 



100 



200 



fiOO 



2 
3 
2 



Lets on Superior street, Endion, very cheap. 

Lets in Endion, $4500. 

Lets in Highland Park, $2500. 
20 A(jres in I 0-50- 1 4 at a bargain. 
63 Lets adjoining London, cheap. 



1 00 A:res in 4-50- 1 5, 25 per cent below the market. 
A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terms. 

Twentv acres on the hill at a great bargain. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 9, Metropolitan Block. 





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DUIiUTH liVENIKG HEBAU>: JAXTJABY 18, 1890. 



PublUhar. 



PRICE. THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Daily, by mall, per year 97.00 

Dally, by mall, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mall, per one month 76 

IK TH« CITT. 

Dally, by carrier, per week 18 



Entered at the postofflce at Duluth, Mlna., 
•econd-clas8 mall matter. 



t* The Washington office of The Hcruld Ig 
at l-tJ4 New York avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kept on file and where The Herald 
oorrespondent will welcome vUitors from the 
Northwest. 



Call fur Kepublloau Caucus. 

All l^ally (iualifl?d voters who intend to 
vote tor the republican cundidates lor the 
various oOices to W fllle<l In the city of Duluth 
on February 4, INtl, at the regular cUy elec- 
tion, are hereliy notiUcd that caucuses wUi be 
held between the hours of 5 and !* p. m.. on 
January •-'4. IS90. for the purpose of electiug 
delegates to the city republican convention. 

TIr' places tor holding caucuses and the 
nunitiT of delegates to which each precinct is 
eutitU'J have iK-en establishetl as follow: 

Firyt wanl— Asa Daley's lumber office. 433 
Lake Hveuue south. 

S<>rf ri'l ward— James McBeth's store. East 
S -reet. 

rd. First Precinct— Store building. 
i .. . . „.t ..no east and First Btreet. 
Njcinid precinct — iSil East Superior street. 
Tiilrd precinct— East End livery barn. 
Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
street. 
Second precinct— 319 West Superior street. 
Thii-d precinct— 701 West Superior street. 
Fifth ward. First precinct— ItiOS West Sa- 
perior street. 
Second (ireeinct— tiSS liartleld avenue. 
Third precinct- lie; West Michigan street. 
Sixth wani—iSl West Michigan street. 
The ba.-iis of n-prescntatiou has been tlxed at 
one dc ■ " I :ich 1(10 votes or uiaj ^r frac- 
tion 1 1 fi>r the republican candidate 
at the iciitial election, and one dele- 
gate at ;.i;fc-e tor each precinct. 

Each ward is entitled to the following' repre- 
sentation: First ward. 4 delegates ; Second 
ward. ;J deiegites; Third ward. First precinct 
4 deie>r:ir;'s: .-^cound pn-eint, 3 delegates: Third 
precin. -^ it<'s; Fourth ward. First pre- 

cinct, -: Sec»)n<l precinct, 4 delegates; 

Thini p; .,; delegates; Fifth ward. First 

precinct, ;i delegates; Sect>nd precinct, 4 dele- 

fates. Third precinct, 3 delegates; Sixth ward, 
delegates. 

James Dixow.^ll, 
Jobs H. L.\V.\yci:, 
P. S. Anxkkb. 

CU.\HLES DtrXCAW, 

H. S. LOBD, 

S. M. Lester, 
City Kepubllcan Oom. 



lis" are putting their beads together to 
make the flnst wooden lock for the canal, 
and who knows but this example of ex- 
alted liberality may induce congress to 
go and do likewise? 

It is not the part of charity to throw 
cold water on this kindling emotion, and 
Duluth can well atford to be charitable. 
She need not even mention the fact that 
water does not run up hill from its 
source, and that the Lake Superior level 
is more than a hundred feet below the 
Mississippi level at St. Anthony's 
Falls. She will utot be called 
up<in to note that the stretching awry 
of the head of inland water navigation 
with the sole object of giving an unnat- 
ural twist to the transcontinental cur- 
rent of trade for the sole benefit of a 
side-tracked city is one of the most pre- 
posterous schemes ever conceived by a 
hopelessly addled brain. Nor will she 
dwell too hardly <». the fact that the 
plain avowals of this editorial of The 
Times and the confession r9r^ed in the 
verj- suggestion of this ridiculous canal 
conceit stamps the weakness of the posi< 
tion of the Twin cities and the strength 
of Duluth beyond the need of further 
question. 

.X)uluthhas now practically touched 
the 4 per cent credit mark. Hayes >!t 
Sons, who were the successful bidders 
for the last issue of 2100,000 4^ percent 
city bonds, have, after a month or two 
of fuss, notilied the city clerk that they 
will take the bonds at once. Their bid 
was at a premium that made the bonds 
par at 4 1-16. This message shows that 
the bidders' heads are now level. It was 
high time to quit fooling. 



NEWS AS IT FLIES. 



City Attorney Smith: Since the ordi- 
nance was passed several have put up 
tire escapes. Others who were notified 
prior to its passage, but have since com- 
plied, even though they abridged the 
thirty day limit, do not come under the 
law. As soon as the board of fire com- 
missioners furnishes me with a list of 
delinquents I will proceed against them. 
General Agent Vance, St. Paul & Du- 
luth: Business has l)een very good with 
us lately. This cold weather has started 
it up considerably. There is no scarcity 
of cars now. 

C. B. Wagar: I was at Tower yester- 
day. Phew, it was cold. Thermometers 
registered 38 below. The hotel was 
like a chunk of ice and we all froze up. 

Col. W. E. Tanner: I hope the people 
will like the next Mozart, and I reckon 
they will. They want to hear home 
talent, and we've given them home talent 
this time. It's a fine program. The 
Herald printed it yesterday. 

C. J. Martin of the Washburn, Crosby 
Milling company: The removal of the 
\yashburn Crosby company to Duluth is 
still an open question. It is still under 
discussion, and the final decision is very 
uncertain. 



A 




Progress of the Great and 

Growing Eight-Hour 

Hovement. 



May I , 
the 



I 890, the Date Set for 
Inauguration of the 
Day. 



What Representatives of Local 

Trades Think of 

It. 



Harr>- Armstrong: No, air; I am not 
a candidate for Col. Colville's shoes; not 
by a d— n sight. I don't care how black 
a democrat the colonel is: the republican 
who would us« any effort to usurp his 
place ought to be kicked out of any de- 
cent community. He ought to have the 
plac« for life. Col. Colville is register of 
the office and its the receivership that 
some of my friends have a petition out 
for. The Herald wa« right and the 
morning paper copied wrong. 

MAYORALTY ACROSTIC. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



Call for City Republican Convention. 

All duly elected delegates to the city repub- 
lican convention will meet in the council room 
at the city ha L nuluth, Minnesota, on Jan. 25, 
1^»|. at •-' p. m , for the purpo<»e of placing in 
nomination republican candidates for the var- 
ious offices as tollows: Mayor; fwoaidermen. 
First war\l; one alderman. Second ward; one 
alderman. Third ward; one alderman. Fourth 
ward; on<' alderman. Fifth ward; one alder- 
man. Sixth ward. 

M. O. Hall, Cbairmaa Com. 



THE FUNNIEST THING OUT. 

As the Twin cities begin to feel the 
force of the drift that is steadily carrj-- 
ing them to a back seat, it is comical to 
see their floundering efforts to bear up 
agaijst the tide. One of the funniest 
dis]jlays of recent days was the two col- 
umn exhibition of The Pioneer Press in 
its zeal to prove that nobody in the 
Flour city used any coal to speak of and 
that 25,(X)0 biirrels of flour could be 
turned out daily with the consumption 
of 100 tons of coal at the most. But 
The Minneapolis Times, resolved not to 
be outdone in desperate devotion to a lost 
cause, now bobs up with the funniest 
thing out. If any representative 
organ of the sinking head 
of the Father of Waters can 
beat this, we should like to see it try. 

How is this for a slogan to rouse the 
Twins .6 one more stroke for their for- 
lorn hope. Awake, arise, or be forever 
fallen! Hoop la I 

'•Minneapolis enterprise and energy 
are famous the world over, and the peo- 
ple of America have ceased to be sur- 
Drised or awed at the immensity of the 
proportions of any scheme, commercial 
or otherwise, which finds its origin in 
the Flour City. The verj- lat«st thing 
in this line, however, may well take 
away the breaths of the people who have 
been born and bred in the dry bracing 
atmosphere of Minnesota, and who were 
lulled to infantile slumber bv the roar of 
the St. Anthony Falls. 

"If reports are true, Minneapolis may 
t)ecome a port of entry in the near fu- 
ture, with direct water communication 
with the Atlantic coast. The plan 
which is said to be under serious discus- 
sion by many of the most prominent 
capitalists of Minneap<jli3, is to secure 
the passage by congress of an act appro- 
priatint,' .«,00O,00O or ^3,<30o,000 for the 
construction of a ship canal from the 
head of Lake Superior at Duluth to Min- 
neapolis, a distance of about 1,50 miles 
The chief end to be subserved in the ac- 
complishment of this great work, is to 
overcome the difficulties which now op- 
pose the increase of the large manufac- 
turing interests here. Men of foresight 
and commercial mtelligence realize the 
fact that cheap transportation is giving 
Duluth an immense advantage over Min- 
neapolis, in th'i way of securing great 
manufacturing plants, and the Zenith 
city bids fair to outstrip the larger of 
"the twins" in this important feature of 
a city's proejjerous growth. 

Coal and pig iron, the two prime essen- 
tials in nearly all the great manufac- 
turee. are. when forwarded to Minne- 
apolis, shipped by way of the lakes to 
Duluth. At Duluth thev must be trans- 
ferred from the barges t<j cars and 
brought to Minneapcjhs by rail The 
expense of the transfer at Duluth aver- 
ages 5«j cents per ton, and freight 
charges from tiiere to this city are 75 
cents per ton. making those commodities 
cost ai.2o more per ton in Minneapolis 
than m Duluth or Chicago. This is 
'*T*'^u'^ a great drawback to the 
establishment of large manufacturing 
interests here. 

"With a canal connecting the two 
points, the lake barges would be towed 
directly to Minneapolis at an expense of 
only lo cents per ton in excess of what it 
costs to deliver at Duluth. Moreover, it 
has been suggested that inasmuch as the 
head of Lake Superior is higher above 
the eea level than the Mississippi isat this 
point water can be drawn from the lake 
through the canal to avoid the disas- 
trous effects of low water in the river 
here. The water power here could 1^ 
inc-reased and made more certain and re- 
liable, and thus the manufacturing pos- 
sibilities of the city would be again in- 
creased." 

As Mr. Squeer's feelingly remarked: 
"Here's richneea for ye." What do 
you want better than this? A canal 
running accommodatingly down hill all 
the way from the head at Lake Superior 
to the Mississippi and closing connection 
on the great water circuit for the benefit 
of the Twina It is true that $5,000,900 
is is a pitiful estimate for the cost of the 
great work of making Minneapolis a 
port of entry from the Atlantic, but 
what iS a hundred million or twice that 
amount compared with the worth of the 
scheme to the sinking Twins. Who can 
measure the value that a drowning man 
win put on a straw and who can say 
that the Twins will not pawn their last 
flour mill to put thei: ship canal 
through? .\lready as we learn from 
this authoritative organ, "many of the 



"I wish my name was Knorr Just now," said 
a drugvist, after reading the quinine article in 
The Herald. "There is a man of that nam* who 
is making a fortunelof the largest dimensions 
just at present, and doing it fast. I mean Dr. 
Jtnorr of the town of Ho<.hst on the Main in 
Germany. He Is the man who owns the secret 
of antlpyrlue. which Is the latest fad of physi 
cians and is declared by theia to be the best 
antipyretic ever brought out. Nobody knows 
just what it is, though all suspect there Is a 
good deal of quinine in it and that the in- 
veutQr has found some process of dissolving 
quinine and giving it greater efficacy. During 
the jpidemic of influenza the rush for this 
drug has been enormous; and the druggists 
can't sell It for more on account of the de- 
mand, because the wholestUe dealers are all 
undercontract to Dr. Knorr tosell it at 81.4^ 
an ounce, neitlier more nor less. The doctor 
will be immensely rich after the epidemic is 

over." 

« * * 

"Duringberboom tbeclty of San Diego an- 
nexed the surrounding country till she was Uic 
third largest city in the United States In point 
of extent ot territory," said E. J. Owen of San 
Diegi), who was in the city last uifht on his 
way home from Chicago. "We made a city 
which covered ground enough to build London 
on. and some of us thought a new London was 
sure to grow there. The city council is just 
now strujrgling to And a method by which 
the geographical size of the city cm be re" 
duced. They are trying to cut off two-thirds 
of the territory now included in the city limits. 
The city now contains about seventy-five 
st|uare miles. The reason they wish to reduce 
the size is that a too hgavy burden is put on 
the city's shoulders in taking care of roads and 
malcLng other improvements." 
• * * 
There are few Duluth theater goers but who 
have been charmed with the acting of Odette 
Tyler, wiio has been seen here several times 
supporting Uttle Minnie Maddern. Particu- 
larly did Miss Tyler shine in "In Spite of Ml." 
Odi tte has an eye to business, as well as a 
talent for acting; therefore she has invested a 
portion of her earnings in acreage at the head 
of the lakes. Of Arthur Miller, Minnie Mad- 
dern's manager. Miss Tyler has recently pur- 
chased forty acres of land near Duluth, pay- 
ing therefor, a good round sum in cash. This 
land is a portion of a piece of ItiO acres Miller 
bought when here during Miss Maddern's last 
engagement at the Grand. 

* * * 
Said a gentleman deeply interested in scho- 
lastic matters: "Manual exercises in the pub" 
lie school? win come to be regarded as impor- 
tant as any branch of study. There is no rea- 
son why the rising generation should not be a 
better race physically than the present. No 
danger of their not being up, if not above, the 
average mentally, for the methods of impart- 
ing instruction are not only vastly superior to 
those employed twenty-five years ago, but 
books and apparatus for the use 
of teachers are correspondingly better, 
gymnastics always have charms for the youth 
With the opportunity of developing the 
muscles will come the zest for study. I think 
the introduction of this feature Into our Du- 
luth 9ch(K)ls is most sensible. The grlrls should 
not be deprived of the opportunities of exer- 
cise by this mi ans. It is just as essential, and 
a Rtxxl deal more so in fact, that our girls 
should be active and strong as the koys and 
this can be'accomplisLed by Judicious manual 
training such as is already an important 
branch of study for the boys in our Duluth 
schools. X have every confidence that Profes 
9or Denfeld. our efficient and progressive su- 
perintent. will do all in his power to see that 



From an aldermanlc standpoint: 

M. J Davis 
E. G. SwanstrOm 

Morris TUuinas 
Robert Ke>"nedy 

James Beattie 

Harrj Arm.Strong 
F. W. Kl'gler 
RoberT Louden. 

President Costello. 
CHarles A. Lotur 
George W. Davis 

James DlNgwall 

THE ART OF COURTSHIP. 



ISpringfleld Union ] 

So ye ast her, did ye, Cyrus? An' she answered 
with a "No:'" 

And ye think the world a sandy desert wilder- 
ness of woe? 

An' the wind is full ur grroanln' an' the air Is 
full uv pizen. 

An' there aln'; no blessed star 
over yer horizon? 



uv hope peeps 



An' the purty smelUn' roses look like tosslls on 

a hearse. 
An' the Joys uv this probation you are flndln' 

very Siurce, 
An' the birds sing funeral dirges to the cars uv 

Cyrus Baker, 

An' the universe is lyln' ready for the under- 
taker. 

Cyrus Baker, yer a flat, sir, an" you couldn't 
well be flatter; 

The way to get the girl ye love is jest by keep- 
in at her. 

All the purty dears are cu'ruB— this Is jest the 
way I view It— 

That the gals would like to love yer, but you've 
got to make 'em do it. 



Don't hang roun 

icicle in June, 
An' go a-Janglin' througli 

out uv tune: 
An' call an' see her now an" then, but don t eet 

sentimental; 
But drop in once or twice a 

accidental. 



a-Iookln' lonesome as an 
the wori", a fiddle 
i.tffet 
month, as it 'twas 



The first day of May, 1890, is to be a 
crucial day in the history of Organized 
labor in the United States. That is the 
day the prophets of labor have set for 
what— if it can be accomplished— will be 
little short of a revolution. On that day 
all over the United States will be inaug- 
urated one of the boldest movements 
that has ever been undertaken by or- 
ganized labor. 

That is the day set when at the same 
time, all over the country, every organ- 
ized laborer has agreed to work eight 
hours and only eight hours a day. There 
have been eight hour movements before 
but they have universally failed. In 
all previous cases the men who have 
quit work have done so with the under- 
standing that they should receive ten 
hours' pay for eight hours' work and the 
effort to obtain it has naturally created 
the most obstinate resistance. 

Xow no such thing will be attempted. 
The men will not ask any such thing. 
They will not ask for any more pav for 
their work, but they wi'll ask for' less 
hours of labor. Organized labor will 
look upon labor as a commodity and bv 
working fewer hours it believes it will 
create an artificial scarcity of the all-im- 
portant commodity and so raise its value. 
That is precisely what capitalists, trusts 
and monopolists have been attempting 
to do in all the staple commodities of 
commerce. They have limited produc- 
tion to create artificial scarcity. 

The laboring men are in fact entering 
into a sort of speculation with the onlv 
commodity that they can command 
They put in the value of their two 
hours' labor a day, with the expectation 
that the value of their labor will be suf- 
ficiently increased to more than compen 
sate them. 

It is estimated that if the movement is 
successful It will result in the employ- 
ment of at least one-fifth more men. It 
is exjjected that this movement will take 
place quietly. No obstinate opposition 
isexjiected-frcmi the employers because 
the men will not ask for any more pay. 
and at first, at least, it will not cost them 
any more for the work. Tlievwill simplv 
employ more men to do it. 



off a day, bd that one week I make 920 
miles and the next week I make 690 
• j miles, but it's a little different with the 
freight men. You had better put your 
pump on some fellow who's pulling way 
freight. 

Cigarmaker on piece work: I get paid 
according to the amount of work I turn 
out and according to grade of stock I'm 
using, but if I was working by the week 
I wouldn't work more than eight hours. 
We're all union men in this shop, and 
we're ready when the time comes to 
help the boys make the shout for eight 
hours. 

Bricklayer: We can't have everything 
we want, but eight hours is a long 
enough day. When a man is turning an 
arch or working on corners he's working 
harder on every brick than the fellow 
who's laying straight work, but he don't 
handle as many bricks. I'll tell you, 
though, if eight hours was a working 
day in every trade, the two hours cut off 
would be more than made up by the 
amount of work done. 

Teamster for jobbing house: Eight 
hours! Well, I work about sixteen. I 
have to do it to take care of my team. I 
feed them at about halfpast 5 in the 
morning and by the time they're through, 
it's time to get to the warehouse. I 
often get caught out with a load after G 
o'cloi'k, so when I get home and get my 
horses fed and bedded it's time to go to 
bed. I'd like to see my day cut down 
about a third. 

Member of city council: Yes, sir; I 
am in favor of the eight-hour movement, 
and on one or two occasions I have made 
my belief known. If I could control it, 
no man in any grade of city work should 
be permitted to work more than eight 
hours daily, unless the excess went in as 
extra time. 



Pecu I iar 

Peculiar la combination, proportion, and 
preparation of Ingredients, Hood's Sarsapa- 
mia possesses the curative value of the best 
known reme- LM^^Jf^ dies of the 
vegetable nOUU Sklngdom. 
Fectaiar In its strength and economy, Hood's 
Sarsaparilla is the only medicine of which can 
truly be said, " One Hundred Doses One Dol- 
lar." Peculiar In Its medicinal merits, Hood's 
Sarsaparilla accomplishes cures hitherto un- 

SiXSarsaparlllat^Je'u 

the title of "The greatest blood purifier ever 
discovered." Peculiar In Its "good name 
at home,"— there is more of Hood's Sarsa- 
parilla sold In Lowell than of all other 
blood purifiers. Peculiar In its phenomenal 
record o^ E>-._, ,|; _ ..salesabroad 
no other r^eCUIiarpreparatlon 
ever attained so rapidly nor held so 
Steadfastly the confldence of all classes 
of people. Peculiar In the brain-work which 
It represents. Hood's 8.ar8apariUa com- 
bines all the knowledge which modem 
research— |a-5« I* in medical 
science has ■ U 115611 developed, 
with many years practical experience la 
preparing medicines. Be sure to gel only 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Bold by all druggists. Jl; six for 55. Prepcu-ed only 
by C. I. HOOD & CO., Apothecaries, LoweU, Maw. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. GEO, B. HATCOCK. 



Maniifer 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 16 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



Two lights of Meffiment. 

MOHMY illD TDESDAT, 

JAN 27 and 28. 



w. 



First appearance here of 

W. TILLOTSON'S 



Merri Comedy Comp'y 

In the New Yorlc success of two seasons. 



Boom 10, 



HUGO & CO., 

iiTs-0-ia.a.iTCE:. 

■ . , METROPtHjlTAS BLOCK. 
TELEPHONE 2*2. 



Cleaned, 



OSTRICH FEATHERS 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



WANTS. FOB SALE. ETC 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 



ZIG 



Presented irlth the orlsinal cast, headed 
the cha -mlng Boubrette, ANNA BOYD. 



by 



Temperature Changed Since Then. 

The two desperate men ran against 
one another when at the very brink of 
the deep, swift stream. They stopped 
and eyed each other with suspicion. 

"Out of the way, sir!" shouted one of 
them. "Why do you seek to prevent 
me from putting an end to a useless 
life?" 

"Out of the way yourself!" yelled 
other; "you are hindering me from 
minating a miserable existence!" 

"Who are you? " 

"I am the inventor of 
plow." 

"And I am the owner of 
slide!" 

They fell on each other's shoulders 
and wept, and then went and drowned 
their sorrows in the strong waters of a 
consolation bazar aiound the corner. 

Got Off Kasy. 

"Larry played in great luck." 

"How so?" 

"Why, he got sent to jail for life for 
killing O'Brien, and begad he died in 
SIX months." 



REAL ESTATE. 



LOANS 



MADE AT 



6, 7 AND 8 PER CENT. 



Sale of see ts Thursday, Jan. 23 
in prices. 



No advance 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH. 



.u'^^'.'^S''^'**^"'^'"^ under this head received at 
the tollowiujf places, besides the business of- 
nco ol llie Herald; 

Kudion Pharmacy. 127 Tenth avenue east. 

iiiJrt"v.V.* "^ Totman. corner Fourth avenue 
and buixrior slrc>et west. 

lu^nui-wot't"","-. i"'"- '?"'• «"'"<^'' Eighteenth 
luenuc wcbt ana Superior street. 

oilufh.*'"'*""''^^''^^'^^''-'''*' ^^'^P^ hotel. West 



Situations Want4>d. 

A^'wh^had'^the ^r. \"',"' ''""le and friends, 
-i..^ WHO nan tiie bad luclito Icwn ilII hfa 
money, is ot jfood habits and has »^^m 
luendalious from two Arms that iS^^S^n 
wuh writes a g«od baiid. is ko.k1 salesiSaL^ 
has been out of situation since New Year- 
should be glad to gut a situation as soon as 
lK).-isible lor board or salary. Address M. C. P 
Herald olhce. 



Help Wanted. 

WANTED-A cook for a small family, 
•lulre, *J(j East Second street. 



In 



JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



This w<»ek, commencing JAN. 
riie Great Attraction, 



13, 



the 

ter- 



a new snow- 



a toboggan 



an' don't hang 



But don't do rosr'lar oourtin' 

roun' an' haunt her. 
An' don't say anj words uv luv, however much 

yer want tor. 
An' ten to one she'll sweeten up, for Nancy 

can't stay soured, 
An'ncitime she'll say "Tea" so quick that 

you'll be overpowered. 

An' then the universe '11 be brim full uv 8on« 

an' praise. 
The sky will be a flower patoh stuck full uv 

sU'ir bouquets. 
The wind'll be a fiddler, playin' tunes upon the 

grass. 
An' hell play his jolllest music w'en you 

Nancy pass. 



THE VOICE OF LABOR. 



Four lots on Eighth street near Third 
avenue oast at a bargain. E. W. Markell 
ground floor Hotel St. Louis block. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



6 PER CENTI 



Money on Hand. 



NO DELAY. 



JONES & BRACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 



PRISON LIFE 

—AND— 

The Best l'ariet| Show in the Northwest 

ADMISSION: 

TEN CENTS ! TEN CENTS ! 



WANTED— Lrt>cal agents to lepresent the 
i-..„ "nacrsigncd at all priuoipai cities In the 
uuiii-u ^t.atot., bt-iiig uiHiiulaciurcrs' airents 
rc-picsent.ugover Utiy diflorent lines of ^ple 
au(lspc-ciali^cs.Koo<is and wares Ut bo sold to 
ih!l ■*.•*• *^'?«''Ketic workers who can irive 
siiiislactory bonds and advance sufficient 

tUwUl And an excellent opportunity tl make 
,?r?. '^.*'l"."^ ''r!\V >' P^-.rmanenl position. aI 
dress CakiwuU Commission C<jmpany. auo Kan- 
dolph Street, Chicago, 111. i.-«>«an 



WANTED- 
LiOuis. 



Bell boys wanted at Hotel St. 



W^^?¥^~-*^ flrst-class German nurse girl. 
Address Koom -'Ct.', First NaUonal bank. 



OFFERED BY 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Very Like a Soul. 
Bismarck Tribune: Corporations are 
not heartless after all, since the Xorth- 
ern Pacific has carried coal from Duluth 
free to needy people in Xorth Dakota, 
which, at tariff rates, would bring KJSGS 
in freights to that roacL And this in 
addition to carrjmg free a vast quantitv 
of miscellaneous supplies to the dis- 
tressed districts. The railroatls. too. 
seldom receive credit for their benefac 
tions, while their shortcomings, real or 
fancied, are verj- quickly playcarded and 
paraded. 



the girls are givt-n exercise.' 

FROM COUNTRY EDITORS. 



A St-andinsvian Opinion. 

Duluth Scandia: We were greatlv 
8urprist>d by reading in The News a re"- 
Port — or what purported to be a report 
—of a Scandinavian mass-meeting held 
Monday night; we were surprised, be- 
cause we considered The News as a 
paper tnat was above such tricks as pub- 
lishing malicious falsehoods in order to 
injure a political antagonist. The News 
starts in by putting as a headline that a 
meeting called in his— Hall's— interest 
goes against him. Now. these words are 
plain enough, and we don't think The 
News will improve its cause by denying 
havmg said them, as it does in yester- 
day's issue. And the rest of what The 
News tells about the meeting is just as 
reliable as the beginning. 

NOTED PEOPLE. 



, „ ^18 

necessarj- to make it healthy and inter- 
esting. A merchant can not do a suc- 
cessful business without patronage, and 
a newspaper must have advertising to 
live. The kind and character of a town 
may be ver\- closely judged by the 
appearance and general tone of its local 
press. 

Battle Lake Review: We notice that 
some publisher in this state is credited 
with having made a "kick"' tecause the 
poor fellows who inhabit the Stillwater 
prison were allowed to spend a "Merry 
Christmas" day. Has that fellow a soul? 
If he has, and it can be found, we would 
advise him to have it put on ice. 

The Weatlier Bulletin. 

Meteorological report recei7e<l at Duluth 
Minn, 8 a. m. Jan l\ itm. 



The Prince of Monaco and his bride 
made a state entry into Monte Carlo yes- 
terday. The town was en fete and much 
enthusiasm was manifested. In the 
Mankato Review: The greatest draw- «^'"°*'?(? there were illuminations, 
back to a country newspaper's prosperity u- , •'° j l '^ ^"•'^ '" ^^^'® bitten to 
is from the fact that the merchants oft u-^ iriends that he has recovered from 
times fail to give it the sustenance of *^'3 recent illness 
life in the way of advertising which is ' * ^^^"^ ^}- Stanley arrived at Suez yes- 

terday. He is enjoying good health and 

will remain there a week. 

A yming Roman Catholic, the daughter 
of an English clergyman, who does not 
wish her name to be known, has resolved 
to follow Father Damien's example and 
to devote her life to caring for the lepers 
at Molokai. 

Ex-President Cleveland has purchased 
two lots near his Washington suburban 
home at Oak view. 

Sir Archibald Alison, who lost an arm 
at Lucknow, has been offered the gover- 
norship of Malta, with a salary of 825,000 
per annum. 

Rider Haggard has abandone<l his pro- 
jected tour in Persia in search of local 
color for his "Queen Esther" in conse- 
quence of the outbreak of cholera, and 
will visit Athens instead. 

Legitime is said to be lurking in 
•Jamaica, waiting for a chance to take the 
held against Hippolyte. 

Comptroller Myers of New York re- 
ceived an avalanche of flowers from his 
employes yesterday, it being his 46th 
natal anniversary. 

Aft«r Business Hours Only. 

"How do you like that cigar? 
called the 'Night Hawk.' " 

"It's easy enough to see why 
called that." ' 

"How BO? " 

"If a man were ever to smoke one of 
them in the daytime he would be ar- 
rested." 



PLACES. . Bar 



Ther. Wind 



:«).:£.' 
::iu.44 

.1 



Duluth .TO 34 

Pt. Arthur.. .■>l.4^s-_i4 

Winnlpcir J:*i.44!— 1« 
St. Vincvnt 
Q'Appelle 
AssfiUb'ne 

Helena 

Huron, DaJi 
St. Paul .... 
La Croese... 
Bismarclc. .. 
Moorbead .. 



-10 

—8 



a).i6- 

30.80 
30 34 

«j.a*l-is 

30.34: —4 



sw 

w 

8 

E 

NB 



w 

SB 

Calm 

NW 

NE 

N 



ttaln. Weather 



.C2 



.01 
.00 



Cloudy 
Cloudless 
Cloudy 
Cloudy 
P't Cloudy 



Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 



i„TJj?#™" ooluipn indicates trace. One (1) 
Inch of rain or melted anow equals ten {10) 'n- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (-) in tcmDerature 
column indicates l)elow zero. «=™Pe«ture 

W. U. Fallon. 

Serge ant Siirnai Corps 
Duluth, Jan. 18.— Local forecast for 
twenty-four hourn, ending 10 a. to. Jan. 
IH: Slightly warmer weather and 
light snow. 



Washington, Jan. m.—Fcyrecaat for 
twenty-four hours, ending .■* a. m to- 
morrow: For Minnesota: Lo<'al snows 
in northern, fair in southern jx)rtion,a 
slight rise in temperature; variable 
wind*. For North Dakota: Local 
snows: slight changes in temperature- 
easterly winds. For South Dakota'- 

moet prominent capitalists of Minneapo-jS.^S;^^aS'r! ''""'' '^''- 



It'a 



IB 



Do Vou Want Cloaks. 

Big auction sale at St. Louis- 



old 



ingr(X)m, commencing Saturday at 
6 p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. 



din- 
2 to 



To Keal Kntate Men. 

Real estate owners and all others 
operating in Superior real estate sub- 
scribe to "Rol^ert G. McDowell's Atlas 
of the City of Superior." 

ROBKKT McFeBRaN, 

W7 w ♦ a Subscription Agent, 
3Zi West Superior street, Duluth 



Expressions From the Bone and .Sinew of 
the Comniuulty. 

The Herald has spent considerable 
time interviewing all classes of people 
on the forthcoming demands of organ 
ized labor for the general observance of 
eight-hours as a full day's work. The 
task has presenteil some difficulties as 
the e.vpressions were made by men and 
women who were an.xious "that their 
names should not appear until the time 
was ripe for the formal demand. It will 
be observed that nearly all classes of 
trade are represented in the interviews: 
Lady clerk: Of course I'm anxious 
for a shortening of my hours of daily 
work. I am supposed to be behind the 
counter at 8 a. m. sharp, and I am not 
off duty again until 9 p. m., with 
the exception of thirty minutes each 
for dinner and supper. Yes, we 
have stools to sit on, but we don't have 
much chance to use them, f<jr if the pro- 
prietfjrs or the floor walker sees a clerk 
sitting down a not altogether gentle re- 
minder is given that the stock needs re- 
arranging. We practically work twelve 
hours a day and the salary ranges from 
.*4.50 to 810 a week, very few getting the 
latter. I don't believe in boyct)tting, 
but I do believe that our hours would 
be shortened if it was generally known 
that the trade of the laboring clas.se8 
would only be given to those stores 
which closed at G:30 and allowed a full 
hour for dinner. 

A journeyman plumber: Do you re- 
member the last la'oor parade in which 
our union appeared in linen dusters and 
stovepipe hats? Well, that was quite an 
event, and people generally thought we 
were a crowd of dudes, 

but they were never more mis- 
taken in their lives. Why, if you will 
come with me, leave the shop at To'clock 
in the morning and stick at a dirty job 
of repairing all day, you'll be mighty 
•rlad when its time to quit, even if yo 
have got to lug your toolsack,furnaceai d 
half a huodretl weight of lead back to 
the shop. Sometimes we get a nice clean 
job of new work, but oftener it is some 
puttering around places which don't 
smell like a peach orchard. Of course I 
want eight hours for a day's work. 

Marine engineer: No, sir; I don't see 
that we require any change. Vou see 
It's different with us; we stand six hour 
watches when we are running with ! 
double crews and we get rested between ' 
heats. Oh, yes, sometimes it's a little i 
tough on a boat where there is only a ' 
single crew, but even then we have long | 
rests. I am in sympathy with all the I 
other trades on shore. No man or woman ' 
should be asked t<JWork more than eight 
hours. 

Street laborer: Yes, sir; it's a long day 
for me; I have to be at work at 7 o'clock, 
and I live near Fifth street and Twenty 
fourth avenue west, and I'm working 
this week on Thirteenth avenue east, 
near Bench street, pretty near thrte 
miles. I have to get up alx)ut halt 
past 4 or ;"» o'clock and got 
my breakfast so as to start 
for work about 6 o'clock. I have an hour 
at dinner, but a man who works outside 
and takes his dinner out of a bucket 
can't get much comfort in the winter- 
he's glad to lie at work again, so he can 
keep warm. We knock off at G, and then 
It s about 7 o'clock when I get home, and 
by the time I have my smoke and choji 
some wood ami do a few chores its nigh 
on to 9 o'clock, so you see we fellows 
only get alxiut eight hours for reet and 
have a little time with the family. 

Riveter in Ixjiler works: Eight hours; 
yes; eight hours is a d—n sight too long 
in this clatter, and ten hours is an out- 
rage. Boilermakers have the infernal- 
est headaches sometimes and the ringing 
and clanging of the hammers don't im- 
prove them, and sometimes we have t^ 
get in such cramped- up positions that 
when we want to move we're so all-Hred 
stiff that old Rip Van Winkle must have 
felt more limoer when he awoke from 
his twenty years' sleep, alongside of us. 
Look in that boiler; I've been lying on 
my back pounding on that crown sheet 
for over three hours, and I feel like a 
barrel hoop. You bet, we'll have an 
eight hour day before this year is out. 

Passenger locomotive engineer: I 
don't know that I want any change; my 
run is ]!;■) miles and I double it and 
make 230 milea in the day, and then lay 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Onimproved Propertj. 



Acreage on the hill, Just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest In this forty 

acres can be had for $62 GOO 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- ' 

„<*^le Division 100.000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 150 

1 Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now is stock in the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An Investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



Humphreys' 

Db Hu«i-n REi-g- Specifics are sclcutlflcally and 
carefully pmpared prescrlptlous ; used formally 

thirty y ears i »ed by the people. Every slnKle Sne- 
clflc Is a 6pe< lal cure for the dlsea.se named. ^ 
These Sp« iftcs cure without dniKglnK, pun? 
hi« or reducing the system, and are In fa^t ai?fl 
deed the SOT ereign remedies of the\t arid. 



I WlfcH to employ a few ladies on salary to 
take cUaiKe ol luy l>usiness at their homes, 
t-ijfht.yery laaoiuatiuK aud liealtlilui. Wiurea 
*1U per week, liefer.- jce giveu. Good payfor 
parttiuie. Address with bumij). Mrs. Marion 
Walktr, Ltiuisvilie, Ky. 



WAXTlip-A irirl lor general house worlc; 
tauuly ol three. CaU ui foreaoou, 411 
> inth aveuue east. 



SNfkO^^S^'**".^*P«''»e« ^ advance. 
*ji>\J\J allowed each mouili. Steady em- 
ploy meiit at home or traveiuig. No soUciunir. 
ttuiicb lielivenug and making coUocUons '^- 



postal cards Address with stamp. 
Ckj., Plqua, Ohio. *^' 



No 
Uafor it 



WAXTED-Paslry cooli. 
Imjuire Phillips hotel. 



also other help. 



LIST or PRIKC a-AX, NOB, CTEKS. pj 

* £*▼•*■«, Congestion, Inflammation 
Wormii, Worm Fever, Worm Colic '. 
Crylna Colic, or Teething of infants 
Diarrl ea, of Children or Adults 
pysenterr, GrlplngtBUlous Colic... 
i t^holera Ittorbna, vomiting.... 



Conght, Cold, 
Neuralgia. T 



Bronchitis. 



Neuralgia, toothache, Faceaehe 
Heada Hies, Sick Headache, Vertteo 
Uyspepsia, Brno II Stomach.... 



tmppre ssed or Pain fnl Periods. 
hue«. too Prof ose ftiiorts 
IcnUBrt: t 
-= ^"v* »*^'"-«"i, ^rjBllK^las, Erupt: 
J3 Kheuniailwm, KheomaUc P.Jn».. 



|5f W*"****' tooProiose PtTiorts 
14 8 ft"!*'- ''"^^' P^IScnlt Brt : thlm 



, . -ng .. 

leum. Erysltwlas, Eruptfoas. 



J 2 Ef.'^"'"""' Ague, ChUls. Malaria, 

ir Piles, llUidorBlwdinK ".. 

Jn wii*"" ^' I°S"*""' *^°'<' In the Head 



li? Whooping Cough. V'olent Coughs. .SA 
.>f S'i'i*''"' WfMlitV.rhyslcal Weakness .50 

41. K.laney Disease .So 

2§ ^«r'"»"' Debility lloo 

SO rrinar r WeakneM, Wetting Bed. .50 
3 J Diseas« • of (heHeart,PalpltaUon 1.00 



WANltD— At the Womaiis Kmployment 
Bureau, ail Superior gtreoi eao'l, two 
second girls and a iluznu girls lor general 
house work. Kmpioyiueut obtained free of 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayers. 



For .Sale. 



J710K SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
J at A. W. Liler's aw Lake avenue south. 



JJ^Oli SALE— Thoroughbred pedigreed Pug 
J pups. Call at New Bodega, a^o West Su- 
perior street. 

JT\()H SALE— My residence with 50 or 100 feet 
J at aiu East aocoud street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. E. A. Ciilbcrt, ^Ji Board of Trade 



C. E 



RICHARDSON, 

325 West Superior Street. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



CLAGOE & PRINDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 
Duluth National Bank Building 



coFrm k wARNEa 

30 FAHGUSSON BL«>CK. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the nnarket. 

COFFIN & WARNER. 



Sold by Dri ggjsra, or sent postpaid on receipt 
M price. Da Hohphbets' MAjfTAi, (144 pages) 
rtcfily bound In cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Hampbrey i'aiedicineCo.lO& Fulton St. N Y. 

S p e: c I F I c s . 



THREE 




The above bright and IxsneTolent face, is Dr. 
A. W. Acker, of England, discoverer of tho 
celebrated Acker's English Remedy for Con- 
sumption and other popular preparations. Dr. 
Acker practised in his younger days among tho 
middle classes of London, and was the means of 
doing" great good, but his health failed and he 
found himself in the grasp of consumption, with 
a wife and child depending upon him for support 
While in this condition, he di.scovered the cele- 
braUMl English Remedy, saved his own life and 
has since saved the li»ea of thousands who were 
on the sure road to death. Any man or woman 
who feels a tickling in the throat, who coughs, 
eapecially in the morning, who raise« or has a 
tight feeling across the chest, who has sharp 
shooting pains through the lungs or difflcultv in 
breathmg, should realize that these are the first 
tympluma of consumption which, if neglected, 
are sure to result fatally. Dr. Ackers Kngliah 
Remeilv has cured more than one thousniid per- 
sons who ^incjuestiooably had consumption and 
who were given up by their friends. It merits 
it* popularity and Is sold by reputable druggisU 
In even- city and t<iwn in America. You can't 
afford to 6e tptthout it. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 



C. SHEfiWOOO & CO.. 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OENDINK BARQAINB IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlfft. parts of the city and 
ACRE PhOPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask is for j.. rties to examine our list aod 

compare them rith other prices before 

buyiuK. Call or write. 

W. 0. Sherwood & Co., 

J. D. & R. C.~RAY^ 

REAL ESTATE. 



ACREAGE 



HEAV 1 HOUSES FOK SALE— 15 head of 
^ht-ivy horses, raised at L,ake Park, on 
tlie Northern Paciflc road, for tale by C. W. 
Harvey. Can Oe seeu at Howara barn, on the 
iiiite shore. Minnesota point. Itesidence. 333 
West iourth street. 



Lost. 

guld-liuk cuff button in 

,^ , ., „. u rings. ix)bt iu Superior 

or Uuluih. Jinder will receive reward by 

lcaviu«: x lie same at uiy office. Uoliert G . Mc- 

SJT West buiHrrior street. 



L'JST-Part of a _ 
slia|>e of three 



Uoweli, 



l^'or UeuU 

ITTOH KENT- Desirable room; 
J steam, etc.; private lamily. 
Herald office. 



bath, gaa. 
Address S., 



WAITED— A furnished bouse for the win- 
ter. L. 3. Taussig, No. a Phoenix blocit. 



FOR KENT — Eight-room dwelling house 
with all moderu impiovements. heating 
furnace, bathrooms, etc., i*U East Third street 
Enquire for particulars, W.N. Pollock, 4749 
Uuuroad street, cast. 



Bargains 



Board and Itooins. 

BOARD AND KOOMS furnished at TSI West 
iirst street. 



If laken at once. 



FiuauciaL 

DTLUTH MOHTGAGR LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amuuut on furni- 
tuiv, pianos, horses aud wagons without re- 
moval li-om owner's iMJSsessioii ; also ou ware- 
uousc recciptjs. bank stocks, and any proiMirty 
ot value; notes discounte'i; partial payments 
received aud your own lime grautt.'d tor pay- 
3'ent; ijodelai'; mouey on liuud aud furnished 
lU'mediately alter security is approved. Wm. 
H >rkau, Alauager, Koom 13, Pargusson block. 
Duluth. Miuu. ^^ 



IV VOL' WISH TO SELL OK HIV DULUTH 
or Superior bank stock, corporation or iu- 
vestiueut securities, call ou or address U. Mur- 
phiu, broker, y Uauuiug block, Dulutb, Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 

"Vr H. WILSON. ATTORNEY AND OOCN- 
J3I • sellor at Law. Will practice in State 
and United States Courts. Ail business given 
prompt attention, 4*Fargussou Block, Duluth. 
Minu. 



ROOM "8," 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



E.C.GK1DLEV. J. C. MISHLRH 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Hfx)ra *. Excharge Bu'lding. 
List your property will us at irhal It is worth 
and we will sell it. We Invite everybodv to 
call In and Ret> us. and solicit «.>rro.spondonce 



3LASTKKLNG. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering douo. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. OBice. room D. Hun- 
ter block. 



Land situated near 




M 



ONEY TO LOAN IN ALL 

Real 
8 per 



sums on Duluth 



and 



Estate at 6 1-2,7 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 
Room 3, - - Mil'^r Block 



L 




31 



RS. J. 8. DLNWOODIE, 



Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight 8ing^ 
lag. Chorus aud Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wiggins's, 16 East 8u 
penor sti-eet, aud at residence, lil Tenth ave. E 



Best Set 
of Teeth. 



I # f* r^ 



$8.C0- 

CUIUIM, 

Painless Dentist. 



-THE- 



■|yj^R.H. PARKEB ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTKCCTION. 



8 MILES BLOCIv. 



MCMILLKN & STKBBINS. AKCrflTECTS 
and superiutendcuts. Office, room No 
— , Kzchaiige building. 



PALMER & HALL, AHCUITECTS AND 
Sui>erinteudeuls.room 4t;, Exchange build- 
inir. Diiluih. Minn. E. .S. PHlraor. (,. P. Hall 




GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 

''^^' A guarante* cure for ail ner 
vous dUeaso such as Weak 
Momorv. LoM Brain Power. 

Hystoria, Headache. Pain In the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhoea, Universal Lassl- 
tiidc. Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
tfcncy and general loss of power 
•)f ttic Generative Organs;— in 
__jj — , Plthei sex. caused by indlscrc^ 
MlftTWUlC* tl>'n or over-exertion, and which 
uiiiuimeo lead to Premature Tr^dmMatS, 
Old Ago. Insanity aud t'onsump- ~ 
tlon. II. UO or a box or six boxes 
for I5.UIJ. Scut by mail on re- 
ceipt of, price. Full partlcalarti 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. w» Oaarautee .Six 
HozeA to cure any case. For 
ever> K.WJ order receded, we 

send six boxes, with a written 

guarantee tf> r;-fund the tconey Jjrrr»TUjTT" 
if our Spoclflc difea not etfect a cure. Address 
all •Himmunlcatloiis to the s<ile manufacturer* 
THE MUBRAr MKDJCINBCO. 

Kansas CltF, Ma 
Hold in Dalath by M»i WIrth. 



Room 1-7, 406 West Superior Street, 
ranruspon Block. Dulutb 



NOTICE TO STEAM FITTEfiS 



Greatest Snaps 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, PropHetor. 




I Sealed proposals will be received until 2 
o clock p. m , January .SOth, 1S90. by E. H. Jeffer- 
son, chairman of committee on court house 
and county jail, for the steam-heating: appara- 
tus in the new county jail, in accordance with 
plans and speciUcations drawn by O. G. Tra- 
phajfcii, archlt<>ct. on file at tho office of the 
county auditor. 

Each proposal must be accompanied with a 
cortitled chock for two hundred dollars, to be 
forfeited to 8t. Louis County In the event that 
the proposal which said check accompanies 
shall be accepted by tho county commissioners, 
and that the person making the pro|>08al shall 



In the market. 



Strictly First-Ciass in all ftppointinents. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



ADDRESS 



fail to coniply 

Address all propi 
care of county auditor, 



with its terms. 

proposals to E. R. Jefferson, in 
. auditor, Duluth, Minn. 
For further information apply to John F. 
bcblonues. superintendent. Duluth. Minn. 

ITlie commissioners reserve the rlfirbtto reject 
any and all proposals. 
Dec 14-18^l-8i-2tJJan l-4-8-lMS-l»4a. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM 
where can be found a warm and pleasant placi 
to read Christian Science literature wi?h 
which the table is supplied and some 'one lo 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
Free of charge. 



toret building 



Gbkat Fl«ench remedy. Dr. I.,EDrr'« 



PER- 



BOX A A, OULUTH, MINN. 



lODic.M. iiij,8. from Paris. Fmnoe.liitonlv on 
thesTcuerative orguns la female^ and 60^1 
UveTy cures suppression of meases (fro.^ v^^' 
ever cause), aud all periodical tftfublSTr 
Uar to women. A safe, reliable Teme^v ' 
S^n'f^.'^nf'''^^ nienslruatiof ^Z^,',. 
tJ.^*^!-*^- ''''""'** °"^ be used during p«"t' iii 



suppression of menses (from whKt. 
ever cause), aud all periodical tftfublSr^ou 
Uar to women. A safe, reliable Teme^v '^■»^ 
ranted, to excite menslruatlon o^"!;;^?,;/ ?^ 

nancy, 
are subject is the direct risiiifoT a dl^rcfei^ 

r^o^^^«^"^i!a-fc,rr'll^^'9 

waulcee. WholesairA^The Vnulne 



only 
A«ts., Du. 



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1>UL.UTH I^V^ENIIN^G HEILAXD: JAIOJARY 18, 1890. 



8 



DULITTH REALTY FOR SALE. 



I 



(0 


<1 



I 
I I 

I 



Pi 





LOTS 



IN 



ON EOT A 



LOTS- 





- CHANOLER - PARK. - LOTS - IN 



LOTS IN CLINTON PLACE. 




S - PARK 



Q 




I 

■ I 

I 



40, 80 and I 80 Acre Plots in Sections 33-49- 1 5 

I 9-49- 1 5 
30-49- 1 6 
32-49-16 
33-49-16 
4-48- 1 6 
34-49- 1 6 



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40, 80 and I 60 Acre Plats in Sections 3-48- 1 6 

28-49-16 

23-49-16 

22-49-16 
33-49- 1 5 

N E I -4 and N I -2 of S E I -4, 240 acres, 20-48- 1 7 



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REFERENCES EXCHANGED. 



ROOM 30, FARGUSSON BUILDING, DULUTH, MINN. 



A PRACTICABLE 




None of the Stage Suppers for 

These, but a Real 

Live Feed. 



Instructing the Amateurs and 

Striking for a 

Square. 



How, to Rehearse a Mob 
Supers on the Theatrical 
Stage. 



of 



"We had walked back to town, Xed 
and myself." said an undertow Thejpian, 
"and struck a chance to act in a com- 
pany with some amateurs for a charity 
benefit. They want«d two professionals 
and we caught on. We lived along for a 
week before the oerformance on free 
lunches, nearly starved to death, be- 
cause we couldn't get a cent from the 
charity folks till we had rendered ser- 
vice. In one of our scenes Xed and I — 
we had low-comedy roles — were to sneak 
into a house where a table was set for 
supper and were to take advantage of 
the opportunity and eat everything ia 
sight. An idea struck me. I told them 
to get up the real thing in the way of a 
supper— that this thing of having 
nothing but plates and Knives and forks 
and glassware on a table for supper 
wasn't art, and if they wanted the per- 
formance to be a success they must go in 
for detail, lika Irving. 

"The women agreed to get up the 
proper kind of a supper and have everv- 
thing there in slap-up fashion, and I let 
it go at that. 

"The best Ned and I could get for 
supper was a slim bite q| crackers and 
cheese in a place where we had hung up 
the barkeep', and inasmuch as we hadn't 
had a square in weeks we were mighty 
near famished. So when the play came 
to *ihe second act and we sneaked onto 
the scene we nearly collapsed. The 
good, guileless women of the charity had 
set out a spread there that would do a 
hungry actor good just to look at. There 
was hot fried chicken with cream gravy, 
nice roast beef, and the finest fried tish 
you ever saw. And the vegetables! Just 
every kind, and preserves, and cakes, 
and lots of things we hadn't seen since 
we quit living at hotels. 

•'Nod and I were a couple of hungry 
tramps in the play, and it was our busi- 
ness to manifest the extremest delight 
and then with the greatest nerve in the 
world sit down and go for the supper, 
which was waiting for somebody else. 
We had only ;i few lines to speak, and, 
at a certain cue, the owner of the supper 
was to say s<jwiething out in the wings 
to a servant and we were to scamper. 
Well, we sat down to that table and hun- 
ger held U8. We spoke a line or two and 
then Ned sjiid, in his character: 

"The will's in a little iron box under 
the old cove's bed.' ["Sufferin' Cyrus, 
Jack, we never can leave this good 
feed!"] 
"And I said, 

"Wonder if we can find his room with- 
out bumping against anybody?' ['Leave 



this? Hardly! We'll stay here till we 
can't eat. 'J 

"They say the old 'un keeps a heap o' 
money in that box, too, said Ned. [The 
cue comes in my next speech.'] 

"So much the better. We'll get the 
will and the money, too. The money '11 be 
ours an' we can make the young 'un 
come down handsome for the will.' [Gag 
it. Don't give the cue.] 

"Kight here we broke away from the 
lines of the piece and Ned said: 

"i'ou remember when we was a visit- 
in' the Prince of Wales and what a 
spread he gave us? 

"Like as if 'twas yesterday, says I, eat- 
ing away like all possessed, same as Ned 
'only it wasn't Sandringham; it was at 
Marlborough house.' 

"You're wrong,' said Ned, chewing 
away on a thigh of chicken, 'it was Sand- 
ringham. 1 remember it especially." 

" 'Nothing of the sort,' says I, helping 
myself to a lot of jelly and roast beef. 
'It was at Marlborough house, 'cause 
after dinner we played billiards on that 
funny squat-legged table in the billiard- 
room, and I beat the prince scandalous.' 
" 'Well, whether it was Sandringham 
or Marlborough, it was a great spread. 
Never had a better.' 
" 'Except one,' says I. 
" 'Where?' says Ned. 
"We were filling up mighty rapid, and 
were spoiling the looks of the table. We 
made one speech last us on an average of 
about a bit« to each word or two. 

" 'When we dined with the Ahkoond of 
Swat,' says I. Ned nearly choked. The 
Ahkoond was a new one on him. But he 
didn't let on. He just said: 
" 'Oh, yes; at Chaosville.' 
"'Correct,' I said, 'in Nomansland. 
What a man the Ahkoond was.' 

"Then I went on to tell funny little 
characteristics of the Ahkoond of Swat; 
how he had a queer matrimonial system, 
and selected his wives by lottery from 
among all the women of his realm, and 
how it didn't make any difference 
whether he drew some other man's wife 
or not — he always took her. I elaborated 
on this, and Ned followed with a remi- 
niscence of the Ahkoond. Finally we 
finished, and Ned said: 

" 'Ah, fine old party, the Ahkoond.' 
Then, returning to the lines of the play, 
he gave the speech with the cue in it. 
'How much do you 'spose he will give 
for that will?' 

"The man in the wing spoke up here, 
and we fell over ourselves in getting 
away. The audience never knew what 
the Prince of Wales and the Ahkoond of 
the Swat had to do with the play, and 
the actors didn't get the nice lunch after 
the show they had reckoned on. That 
meal lasted us three davs." 



shouted at the top of his voice: "Why 

in don't you fellows do it the way 

I do?" 'If we could do it the way you 
can, Mr. Forrest," spoke up a sickly 
looking boy, "We would not be working 
for twenty-five cents per night.' 

"That is just the idea. Supers are not 
great actors. Yet in many produc- 
tions they are as important to the 
success of a piece as the star. 
"Oh, yes, some very funny things have 
happened while rehearsing the mob. The 
otter night I had a crowd in Circleville, 
Ohio, to rehearse. I told them to make 
as much noise as they possibly could. In 
one line Carrac shouts 'Long live the 
republic' The mob repeats the cry. 
But in Circleville they improved upon 
Mr. Mackeye. Carrac shouted his lines, 
'Long live the republic' The mob 
shouted in perfect unison in return, 
'Long live the republicans.' It broke 
the actors all up. 

"-\ very funny mistake was made the 
opening night in Louisville by the mob. 
You know in the last act they are in- 
structed to tear everything on the stage 
to pieces. Well they did it. Not con- 
tent with tearing the scenerj- down they 
also bore away the flies and attempted 
to toss them into the river. GTranite 
pillars and everything else were sacri- 
ficed to the mob. There was nothing 
else left to tear up but the carpet oti 
the stage. Mr. Haworth was supposed 
to be in hiding behind a large chair. But 
the mob didn't care. They just fired 
Haworth out of the chair and tore the 
carpet from beneath his feet. The audi- 
ence shrieked and applauded in the 
most determined manner. The mob 
was encouraged by the encore, and were 
it not that Hawofth interfered John 
Macauley's theater would have been a 
wreck." 



SOMETHING ABOUT MOBS.! 



IIow 



'Paul Kauvar's" Kmisiutry Gets the 
".SanM Cullot«»" Into Acting. 

"How to rehearse a mob?" 

"Of course you do not know. Nobody 
ever does until the mob is faced for the 
first time. Supers, as they are called, 
are a most intelligent crowd, providing 
they are told what to do. But send the 
supers on the stage without a rehearsal 
of any kind and they lose their intelli- 
gence. Theatergoers have a queer 
opinion about supers. They think that 
they should all be actors. You laugh when 
you see them appear on the stage as a Ro- 
man army. Yet if those very same supers 
were given the proper rehearsal their 
efforts would be appreciated by the loud- 
est kind of applause." 

"Mobs are supers and supers are 
mobs," continued Mr. Dorhan. "When 
one faces a crov/d of supers he must 
make up his mind for good that they 
are not born actors. You will remem- 
ber the story once told on Edwin For- 
rest. The supers were very bad at re- 
hearsal and Forrest got mad. He 



The Growth of the Navy. 

The Baltimore and the Charleston, 
just added to the navy, make in all 
eight new vessels of superior construc- 
tion and size now in commission. The 
squadron of evolution now in Mediter- 
ranean waters is by far the best naval 
showing the United States has made in ! 
recent years, and together with the two 
vessels recently put in commission, once | 
more place the navy of the United 
States upon a respectable footing with 
the maritime nations of the world. 
Scarcely half of the old navy is in ser- 
viceable condition, but the new vessels 
and those to be added the present year 
will at least form a navy of suflicient 
size and effectiveness to maintain, under 
ordinary conditions, the honor of the 
American flag upon the seas. It is ex- 
pected that at least five new ships will 
be added to the navy during the year — 
namely, the Philadelphia, the San Fran- 
cisco, the Concord, the Bennington and 
the V^dvius— and congress will be asked 
to authorize the construction of at least 
ten new ships during the present ses- 
sion. Altogether it now looks as if the 
United Statas will soon be in a condition 
to give attention to its interests, whether 
in Behring sea, the Pacific ocean or 
nearer home. 



A SEASO NABLE STORY. 

And How the £tnpty-Fated Citizen Learned 
a Lesson. 

Detroit Free Press: The other after- 
noon, while the rain was pouring down, 
a citizen left the postottice to encounter 
an acquaintance who was also sheltered 
by an umbrella. 
"Raining, isn't it?" queried the first. 
"Hey?" 

"Raining, isn't it?" 

"I'd like to see you a moment," was 
the reply. "Come up stair." 

The two passed up, traversed the dark 
hall to its clarkest corner, and then No. 2 
turned to No. 1 with: 

"Do you take me for an infernal 
idiot?" 
"Why. of course not." 
"Do you suppose I'm carrjing an um- 
brella around to keep the sun off at this 
time of year?" 
"No." 

"I'm carrying it to keep the rain off, 
am I not?" 
"Of course." 

"Well, then, it rains. You know it 
rains. Everybody in town knows it 
rains. Now, you go on and let people 
alone." 

"But— but " 

"That's all. You let it rain. She knows 
her business. You just attend to your 
own affairs and let the weather alone. 



\ another shy at it today, and maybe I 
shall be able in the course of a few years 
to make out what he means by those t's 
that look like w's and those I's without 
any eyebrows." Other letters are read 
and thrown away and forgotten, but 
yours are kept forever— unread. One of 
them will last a reasonable man a life- 
time. 



Good day, sir. 

And he went clumping down stairs and 
left the other to follow at his leisure. 



Know Your Business. 

Burdette: Mr. Vanderbilt pavs bis 
cook 810,000 a year, my boy, which is a 
great deal more than you and I earn— or 
at least it is a great deal more than we 



is all. 
better 
That 
could 
little. 



HER SCEPTER. 



He saw her, but she paast-rt and saw him not ; 

H<j followeil, but she coldly turned a.slde; 
He woed her. but the secret of her tbouKiit 

The draperies of her eyelios seoinod to hide. 

He found no pleasure in tlie whole wide world 

Save in her presence, and with matoble^s art 

He awoke the slumbering passions that lay 

curled 

On beds of dreams In her whtte-vurt«ined 

heart. 

She turned the key and opened wide the door 

Upon her pure love's treasures of tine frold, 
"All these," she said, "arf thine forevenuore ; 
iaught 
hold.' 

He kissed her lightly and then turned aw y; 

In these fond worths the scepter of lier power 
Sh(? lost forever; henceforth from that day 

He held her as the plaything of an hour. 

—Ella Wheeler Wilcox. 



get — because he can cook. That 
Presumably because he can cook 
than any other man in America, 
is all. If Monsieur Sauceagravi 
cook telerably well, and shoot a 
and speak three languages tolerably 
well, and keep books fairly, and sing 
some, and understood gardening pretty 
well, and could preach a fair sort of ser- 
mon, and knew something about horses, 
and could telegraph a little, and could 
do light porter's work, and could read 
proof tolerably well, and could do plain 
house and sign painting, and could help 
on a threshing machine, and knew 
enough law to practice in justice's courts 
of Kickapoo township, and had once run 
for the legislature, and knew how to 
weigh hay, Tie wouldn't get $10,000 a 
year for it. He gets that just because 
he knows how to cook. It wouldn't 
make a cent's difference in his salary if 
he thought the world was flat, and that 
it went around its orbit on wheels. 
There's nothing like knowing your busi- 
ness clear through, my boy, from withers 
to hock, whether you know anything 
else or not. What's the use of knowing 
everything? Only the sophomores are 
oaaniscient 



Beating a Circus Agent. 

New York Sun: The weekly paper on 
which I learned my trade was situated 
in a town which no circus going West 
ever skipped. We used to count on those 
circus "ads" as regularly as we did on 
the holidays, and for years and years we 
were without a break. Our object was, 
of course, to get as high a rate as possi- 
ble, and to get a high rate we had to 
boom the circulation. It held steady at 
about 4r)0, and for the first three or four 
years it was suflicient to tell an agent 
that we printed "about 1000 coi)ie8." 
After that, however, there was one chap 
who gave us trouble. He was an agent 
for old Dan Rice, and he paralyzed us by 
asking to see the pile of paper we liail 
wet down for the outside pages. While 
he didn't get to see it, he knocked our 
regular ^40 ad down to g-JO, and he had 
no 8o<jner gone than we began to plan to 
beat him ntxt season. 

About the time he was expected we 
got an extra bundle of paper, fixed it 
with the landlord of the hotel to notify 
us, and the idea was to wet down 
enough to show a full 1000 copies. We 
were daily expecting a call, when an old 
tramp printer slouched into the ollice 
one morning and asked for a job. We 
were just getting ^dy to work off the 
outside pages, and as he said he was 
used to a "Washington" he was offered 
a quarter to pull the edition. He knew 
his business. He could "fly" and "point" 
his shoete with surprising dexterity. 
"Is that all?" he rtpally said. 
"Yes, that's all." 
"I make the pile 450." 
"It's alxjut 480. Here's your quarter, 
and perhaps I'll let you set up an auc- 
tion bill this afternoon." 

When afternoon came in walked the 
circus agent. We took one look at him 
and fainted. He was the identical chap 
who had done the press work of the 
morning. When we recovered conscious- 
ness he was holding out his blistered 
hands and saying: 

"I'll fill out a contract for 818 and leave 
six tickets. Sorry for you, gentlemen, 
but perhaps y(»u can get rid of that extra 
bundle of paper by discounting liberally 
on the price. I'm working this little 
racket all along the line, and it's curi- 
ous how fast the circulation of the 
papers gets below five hundred." 



AN EARLY FLIRT. 

Pattl's Experience at .Sixteen in anldld 
Western Town. 

La Salle Republican: A number of 
residents here have, during the past 
week or so, gone to Chicago to hear Ade- 
lina Patti. Many of them were not 
born when she sang in La Salle, as per 
the following announcement, which is a 
facsimile of the original except in the 
display type, which appeared in the La 
Salle Press under date or Wednesday, 
August 29, 1856: 

Great Musical Attraction 

At the Haptist Church 

This Evening. 

Olo Bull 

Uespectlvely announces to the citizens of La 

s-ulle and vicinity that he will give positively 

only one 

Grand Concert 

On Wednesday Evening, Aug. 30th, 

Assisted by the following eminent 

Artists: 

Adelina Patti, 

The Wonderful Vocalist, surnamcd 

"TIjc Young Mallbran;" 

Louis Sehreit)er, 
The Great Cornet Player; 
FranX Hoth, 
Tlie Distinguished Pianist and 
Comptiser. 
EBTor particulars see Program. 
Tickets,*!. Reserved seats. $1.50, to be had 
alJ. W. Garfield's Music Store, where a Dia- 
gram of tiie House may be seen. Tickets also 
for sale at the Hardy house and at the door. 

Doors open at T'i o'clock. Concert to com- 
mence at H. 

Ole Bull was taken sick a day or two 
after that concert, and went up to the 
Sulphur Spring house, then kept as a 
hotel, where he remained for a week or 
more and was attended by the late Dr. 
H. M. Godfrey, then a resident of this 
place. Patti stopped at the Hardy house, 
then kept by J. Anthony, for three or 
four days and roomed with the land- 
lord's daughter. She was at that time 
apparently 15 or 16 years of age, swarthy 
as an Indian, and full of life. She 
took great delight in carrying on a hand- 
kerchief flirtation with a young man 
who was then a clerk in the Cruick- 
shanks bank across the way in the Sharp 
building. In view of her brilliant and 
wonderful career and the universal fame 
she has achieved, this little reminiscence 
of her early life is not without interest. 



LOUIS LANA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 26 
West Superior street, has opened at 

28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



With a complete stock of 




Mortgage Sale. 



WHAT LOVE IS. 



How Prof. Morae Writen. 

The Boston correspondent of The Book 
Buyer quotes an amusing letter sent by 
Mr. Aldrich to Prof. E. S. Morse, ex- 
preeident of the American Academy for 
the .\dvancement of Science. Professor 
Morse, it should be said, has a hand- 
writing quite indescribable in illegibil- 
ity. 

My Dear Mr. Morse—It was very 
pleasjint to me to get a letter from you 
the other day. Perhaps I should have 
found it pleasanter if I had been able to 
decipher it. I don't think that I mjis- 
tered anything beyond the date (which I 
knew) and the signature (which I 
guessed at). There's a singular ftld per- 
petual charm in a letter of yours; it 
never grows old, it never loses its novel- 
ty. One can say to one's self every 
morning: "There's that letter of Morse's. 
I haven't read it yet. I think I'll 



lEila Wheeler Wilcox.l 
Love is the center and circumference. 

Tlio cause and aim of all things: 'tis the key 
To Joy and sorrow, and the recompense 

For all tlie ills that have been or may 1k>. 

Love Is as bitter as the dregs of sin, 
As 8wi>et as clover-honey in its cell, 

Lf>ve is the pass-word wbcrebv souls get in 
To neaveu— the gateway that leads sometimes 
to hell. 

Love is the crown that glorlfles— the curse 
That brands and burdens— It is life and 
death. 

It is the great law of the universe. 
And nothing can exist without Ita breath. 

Love is the impulse which directs the world. 

And all things know it and obey its (Hiwer, 
Man, in the maelstrom of his passions whirled; 

The hue, that takes the pollen to the Hower. 

Love is the only thing that pays for birth. 
Or makes death welcome. Ah! dear God 
above 
This beautiful, but sad, perplexing earth. 
Pity the hearts that know, or know not. 
Love. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 

heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 

take I them, and do the work for you promptly. 



DEFAULT HAVING BEEN MADE IN THE 
payment of the sum of three hundred 
fifteen oO-KX) dollars i*3irir>0), principal and 
iiiterest, which is claimed to be due at the date 
of this notitH.' upon a certain mortgage, duly 
executed and delivered by Francis X. Parent 
and Mary E. Parent, his vife, to Henry F 
Davis, l)earing date the seventh day of June 
A. D. im), and duly recorded in the office of 
the register of deed' in and tor the county of 
St. Louis, and state of Minnesota, on the 
eighth day of June A. 1). IfWy, at 8 o'clock and 
id minutes. A. M., in Bixik 41 of Mortg.igi>s, on 
page «T, and no action or proceeding at law 
or otherwise having been instituted to recover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any part 
thereof: 

Now therefore, notice Is herebv given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale eontainc-d in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and i)rovided,» Ifce said .Mortgage 
will l)e foreclosed, and the itemises described 
in and covereil by said mortg&gc, viz: 

Lots three (JDand four (4), of section eighteen 
(18), and lot (8), of section nineteen (IH), all 
in township sixty-three (KJ), north of range 
twelve (12), west of the 4th principal meridian 
in St. Louis county, and state of .Minne- 
sota, with the hereditaments and appur- 
tenances, will be sold at public auction 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said' 
debt and interest, and the utxos, if anv 
on said premises, and twenty-flve dollars 
attorney's fee, as stipulated In and by 
said mortr-ige in case of foreclosure, and the 
disbursements allowed by law; which sale will 
l)e made bv the sheriff cf said St. Ix)uls 
county, at the front door of the Court House 
In the city of Duluth in said county and state, 
on the 3»th day of January. A. D. 1«»(), at 10 
o clock a. m. of that day, subject to redemi)- 
tion at any time within one year from tlie day 
of sale, as pn)\ided by law. 
Dated December 13th, A. DUIBSO. 

HbjI^v F Davis, 

D », .. Mortgagee. 

R. N. Makblk, 

Attorney. 
Doc. 14-31-28. Jan. 4-ll-l».%. 



orted and Domestic Cigars 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Pine Cut aod Plug Tokcos, Etc. 




^ 



Don't forget the number, 




28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



LOUIS 



LANA. 



■f 



t 



HL- 



■ "^ »'^ ^ m^ XI 






■^. ■ « I 



■ I— »..w' *i' i 



** t l ±1. AL. I 



4 ' ■ L " ' J '- I ■ I r i ^ » f » 



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TfX .fi t 



pH«Mn«nwiHWM«MM«4K>i - 



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•ir 




i 



UVJAJTU EVmtTNQ HEBALD: JA^TJARY 18, 1890 



IT LOST ITS 




Experience of a Herald Man 

as Bo'sun's Boy on a 

Steam Ship. 



There Wasn't Much Fancy 

After the Ship Left Her 

Moorings. 



A Class of Brutal Sailors 

That is Now Nearly 

Extinct. 



nit waa reading Capt Marryat's "Mid- 
shipman Easy" which first created a de- 
sire in my youthful breast to go to sea. 
Before I had reached my 12th year my 
mind was fully luade up. To be a sailor 
became the pinnacle of my ambition. To 
such an extent was I imbued w^ith this 
determination, I became discontented 
and unhappy. My parents were strongly 
averse to the idea, but the more they 
opposed me the greater grew my desire. 
At length the opportunity came. 
Through the exertions of a friend a 
position as bo'sun's boy was found for 
me on an Atlantic steamer. For a time 
my parents were obdurate, but my friend 
adding his persuasions to my entreaties, 
a reluctant consent was secured. The 
day of departure came, and with a 
bounding heart I signed articles and be- 
came a sailor; an ordinary seaman I was 
rated on the ship's books, but no com- 
modore was prouder than I, though my 
position was the least in the ship's com- 
pany. I was not quite 12 years old, 
small, slight and delicate, and was un- 
used to labor; had never sutFered ex- 
posure. 

When the ship had cleared the dock 
and we were ten feet from the quay a 
wild longing seized me to jump ashore 
and run home. This being impossible I 
retired to a corner and indulged in a 
heartfelt burst of tears, for this was the 
first time I had ever been more than half 
a dozen miles from home. I was sob- 
bing in the excess of my grief when a 
heavy hand was laid on my shoulder and 
a ijrutf voice asked. 

^ '-What's all this blubbering about?" 
Swallowing my emotion the 

best I could, I turned and beheld 
a short, thick set man, with a 
heavy black beard, dressed in a guern- 
sey and wearing a Scotch cap. He re- 
peated his question, shaking me 
roughly. 

"I would like to go home, if you please 
air," was my tearful answer. 

He received this appeal with a hoarse 
laugh. "Who are you? '' said he. 

"I'm the bo'sun's boy" I quavered. 
"Oh, you are, are you? Well, I'm the 
be'sun; come with me," and clutching 
me by the arm he hauled me along with 
verj' little ceremony till we reached a 
small apartment on one side of the ship, 
over the door of which was inscribed on 
a small brass plate, "Boatswain and 
Mate." "Now," said the bo'sun, "if 
you'll be a good boy.I'U introduce you to 
my daughter." I thanked him fer- 
vently, for even at that tender age I 
had a predilection for the fair sex, v.hen 
to my horror he reached behind the door 
and held before my appalled gaze a for- 
midable rope, with three knotted ends. 
"Here's my daughter," said he, "and 
the sooner you become acquainted with 
her the better," and swinging the rope 
around his head he gave me several 
smart cuts across the back with it. 

"Now don't let me hear any more 
about going home," he growled, "or I'll 
lick you tUl you can't stand and throw 
you overboard, too: get out I" 

I didn't wait for any further invitation 
but placed as much space between my- 
self and the bo'sun as was possible un- 
der the circumstancea Hiding in a dark 
corner, I peeped through a port hole and 
gazed at the fast receding shores of my 
native land in bitterness of grief. My am- 
bitions as to the sea were fully satisfied. 
I would have been quite content to have 
my marine existence terminate at once 
and forever. But I was not permitted to 
enjoy these retiections very long. A 
sharp, shrill and protracted whistling 
was heard, followed by the hoarse bellow 
of the boatswain, "All hands to muster." 
There being a general rush to the quar- 
ter deck I tumbled up with the rest. 
The second mate held a roll in his hand 
and called off the ship's crew, each one 
being required to walk before him, sa- 
lute and passdoTrn the other side. When 
my name was called I stepped up and 
responded in so faint a tone he did not 
hear me. Calling out my name the sec- 
ond timo, I answered at the top of my 
voice, much to his surprise and the mer- 
riment of the others. 

In deep confusion, I made my escape 
only to run against the "bo'sum" at the 
foot of the ladder. Greeting me wi'^h a 
couple of kicks and much profanitv, 
he commanded me to go to his room 
make up his bunk and prepare his sup- I 
per. My tribulations in trying to ar- 
range his sleeping place, " were only 
equeled by my attenpts to make a 
spread for his evening meal. His mate 
a very decent fellow, evidently felt torry 
for me, and showed me how to do the 
work. This much accomplished my 
spirits began to rise a little. By this 
time, however, I had a wholesome dread 
and horror of the boatswain, pretty 
much the same as at the bovs at Do- 
the boys hail had for Squeera. Every 
time I was in his presence I was seized 
with such a nasvous dread. I became 
utterly incapable of doing anything 
properly, and in waiting upon 



day we were in mid - At- 
lantic, my sea-sickness did not 
desert me, and added to it 
were the wildest longings for home. I 
shall not soon forget my sensations 
when a number of the steerage passen- 
gers, among whom were several hundred 
Germans sang, "Home, Sweet Home" in 
their own language. The ship was roll- 
ing and pitching fearfully, the wind 
howling through the rigging like the 
wail of a distressed spirit. The night 
was pitchy dark, and every few minutes 
a tremendous wave would break over, 
which drew forth shrieks from the wo- 
men between decks. It was the most 
dismal and doleful Christmas I had ever 
experienced and it made an impression on 
my youthful mind which time will never 
efface. Before midnight several of the 
crew who had bribed some one to buy 
liquors at the bar for them, were drunk 
and there were several fights, one man 
being so badly knocked about be was 
left in the hospital when we arrived at 
New York, and died. 

New Year's eve we were off the banks 
of Newfoundland, and the fog being 
very dense, the New Year was ushered 
in with the dismal tooting of the steam 
whistle. The boatswain did not relax in 
his attentions toward me, and one hor- 
rible night, in a fit of passion, he seized 
me and held me over the ship's side till 
I was drenched, and momentarily ex- 
pected he would drop me into the boil- 
ing sea. My sensations may be imagined. 
On another occasion I was ordered aloft 
with the remainder of the crew. Not 
being accustomed to climbing, my 
motions did not suit the boatswain. He 
foUowetl me closely, cutting me all the 
way. How I managed to cling to the 
frozen shrowds I never knew. He 
knocked my cap overboard, and the 
wonder is that I did not follow it. I was 
so overcome with terror and benumbed 
with cold, I never should have held on, 
when, seeing my condition, with many 
oaths he ordered me below, promising 
that he would pay me for it. He kept 
his word faithtuliy. I suffered this 
treatment all through the voyage, and 
when I left the vessel after arriving 
home no liberated galley slave ever felt 
more excess of joy. I was thoroughly 
cured of the desire for a seafaring life, 
and have never felt the least inclination 
since, although this was nearly twenty 



WHY HE MARR IED HER. 

An Old Cr«ntleinau TellH How Hih Wife 
Won HIh Heart. 

New York World: "How did I come 
to fancy my wife?" repeated an old 
gentletran, one of the successful men of 
this age, whose wife was noted rather 
for her domestic virtues than social 
qualities. "Why, I saw her sewing, 
busy mending and repairing the clothes 
of her little brother. I had been meet- 
ing society girly, who sat idle and list- 
less, or who stared hard at me, but I 
never felt drawn to them. When I saw- 
Lucy bending gracefully over a bit of 
plain sewing and repairing and sewing 
on buttons I thought of what she would 
be in her own home. It made me wish 
to have her in mine. I knew she would 
make a good wife, and she has." 

"Now girls, rememberthis. Who knows 
but you may weave a young man's heart 
with your needle. Men like domestic 
girls, and sewing is the best accomplish- 
ment a woman can have. Remember, 
too, that domesticity is not incompatible 
with social qualities, for some of the 
best Housekeepers and most devoted 
wives and mothers are queens in so- 
ciety."' 



years ago. 



Bkock. 



THE BABY KING. 

Spuin'it Young Kuler and Uiit luiportauce 
to the Politician!!. 

New York Sun: Alfonso XIII has a 
long list of names. They begin thus: 
-Alfonso Leon Fernando Maria Jacobo 
Isidore Pascalo Antonio. He was born 
in Madrid on May 17, 1886. In response 
to an official summons the most impor- 
tant people of Spain assembled at the 
palace to await the accouchement. The 
event was of more than unusual im- 
portance even in royal life, for Alfonso 
XII had died on the "Joth of November 
preceding, leaving no male heir. The 
countr>- was politically turbulent, and 
conservatives and monarchists hoped 
that the queen would bring forth a son, 
believing that such an issue would do 
much to prevent disorder, if not revolu- 
tion. Consequently the birth of Alfonso 
was hailed all through Spain and the 
colonies with satisfaction. 

The little magnate had hardly been 
clad in his first garments when he was 
proclaimed king. The queen at that 
time was Alfonso's elder sister, Maria de 
las Mercedes, her mother, an Austrian 
archduchess by birth, acting as regent. 
Her regency was continued after the 
birth of her son. .According to the most 
recent constitution of Spain, adopted on 
June 30, 1876, the succession to the 
throne will devolve upon Maria de las 
Mercedes again if the king dies. 



The nioiide the .Material Woman. 

They say the blonde is the ideal 
w-oman; asfor me, Isay the blonde is 
the material woman, par excellence. See 
those golden locks, those lips red as 
blood, those deep gray eyes, that rose- 
tinted flesh, that Titian knows so well 
how to paint, and tell me what are the 
thoughts with which they inspire you! 
Besides, we have Venus among the 
Pagans, and Magdalen among the Chris- 
tians, both of them blondes. While the 
woman who is a brunette, who is really 
as much of an anomaly as a man who is 
fair,— the brunette, with her eyes of vel- 
vet and her skin of ivor.V, may remain 
pure and divine in our thoughts. There 
IS a fine picture of Titian's in the Borg- 
hese palace called "Pure Love and Im 
pure Love." "Pure Love" is a beautiful 
woman with rosy cheeks and black hair, 
who IS regarding with a tender look her 
infant child whom she is holding in the 
bath. "Impure Love" is a reddish 
blonde who is leaning against something, 
—just what, I do not remember,— with 
her arms crossed above her head. For 
the rest, the normal woman is fair, and 
the normal man dark. -Journal of Marie 
Bashkirtsetf, Cassell A Co.. New York. 



A FOOLISH KINO. 

[From Gilbert and Sullivau's new opera, "The 
Gondoliers."] 
niore lived a kinir. as I've been told. 
In the wonder-working' days of old. 
When hearts were twl<-e as firtxx] as grold 

.\nd twenty times as mellow. 
Good temper triumphed in bis face. 
And In his heart he found a place 
For all the ei riag human rac«> 

And every wretched fellow. 
When he had ItbeiuUh wine to drink 
It made him very sad to think 
That some, at junket or at jink. 

Must be content with toddy. 
He wished all men as rich as he 
(And be was rich as rich could be); 
So to the top of every tree 

Promoted everybody. 

Lord chancellors were cheap as sprats 
And bishops in their shovel bate 
Were plentiful as tabby cats— 

In jMjlnt of fact, too many. 
Ambassadors cropped up like hay, 
Priino ministers anil such as they 
Grew like nsparaKus in .May, 

And dukes were thri>e a penny 
On every side Ueld marshals grieamed. 
bmall iHH^r were lords lieutenant deoraeil 
*V 1th adnnrals the ocean teeme<l 

All n)uud his wide dominions. 
And party loaders yon ml^lit meet 
In twos and threes iti every street 
Maintaining, with no little boat. 

Their various opinions. 

That king-, although no one denies 
His heart was of abnormal size, 
Yet he'd have acted otherwise 

If be had been acuter. 
The end Is easily foretold. 
When every blesse<l thing you hold 
Is made of silver or of gold 

You long for simple pewter. 



To the Fublie ! 

From tonight on, until March 1 we 
shall close our store ai 7 o'clock evenings 
except on Saturday. The Eagle Cloth- 
ing Co., 18 West Superior street. 
Levy Bros., Proprietors. 



Good Books. 

The Book Fiend: Books are not made 
for furnit ire, but there is nothing else 
which so beautifully furnishes a house. 
The plainest row of books is more sig- 
nificant of refinement than the most 
elaborately carved sideboard. Give us a 
home furnished with books rather than 
furniture— both, if you can, but books at 
any rate. Books are the windows through 
which the soul looks out. A house with- 
out them is like a room without windows. 
No man has a right to bring up his chil- 
dren without surrounding them with 
books, if he has the means to buy them. 
It is a wrong to his family. Children 
learn to read through being in presence 
of books. The love of knowledge comes 
through reading, and the love of knowl- 
edge in a young mind is almost a war- 
rant against the inferior excitement of 
passion and vice. 



Done I'p For an Overcoat. 

"I was coming up from the depot," he 
was explaining to a police officer yester- 
day, "coming up from the depot with 
my 850 overcoat on my arm, when a fel- 
ler runs agin me. I wasn't to blame, 
but he called me a chump and a slouch 
and a hayseed, and added that he would 
lick me for a cent. Well, you know, I 
didn't want any fuss, but a second feller 
comes up and says to me: 

"You go for him and shatter his sys- 
tem. He's an awful coward and is just 
a-blulling." 



Marie Baslikirtsett'. 

Journal of Marie Bashkirtseff, Cassell 
.t Co., New ^ ork: Oh, when I think we 
have only a single life to live, and that 
every moment that passes brings us 
nearer death, I am ready to go dis 
tracted. 

I do not fear death, but life is so short 
that to waste it is infamous. 

.A.S a general thing, the family and 
friends of great men do not l)elieve in 
their genius; in my case it is too much 
the other way; that is to say, that it 
would not surprise my family if I were 
to paint a picture as large as Meilusa's 
raft, and receive the cross of the Legion 
of Honor for it. Is this a bad sign? I 
hope not. 

The hardest thing to bear is to be con 
tinually disappointed in those nearest 
to us. To find a serpent where one had 
expected to find flowers, that is indeed 
horrible. But these constant shocks 
have produced in me at last a species of 
indifference to them. No matter what 
18 passing around me I take no notice 
now. I put my head out of the door 
only to go to the studio. 

I wdl tell you that I think I shall 
never be seriously in love. I invariably 
discover something to laugh at in the 
man, and that is the end of it. If he is 
not ridiculous, he is stupid, or awkward, 
or tiresome; in fine, there is alwavs 
something, if it were only the tip of his 
ear. 

For a month past I have heard noth- 
ing but words of commendation, with 
the exception of one occasion a fortnight 
aga This morning I was scolded, and I 
have forgotten everything but the scold- 
ing. But it is so always. A thousand 
persons applaud; a single one hisses, and 
his voice drowns the voices of all the 
others. 

No other form of government can be 
compared to the ideal republic, but a 
republic is like ermine^-the slightest 
blemish upon it renders it worthless. 
And where will you find a republio with- 
out blemish? 



Robert G. McDowel 

327 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

GROUhO FLOOB. 

OPPOSITE ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 
Offeisthe following 

km m LOTS 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME— 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Gnat Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthful. Sol'd only Tn Cans 

_ PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 



kM 



FOR SALE: 



CHICAGO. 



ST. LOUIS. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



ONEOTA PARK I 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 



50-14" D Hcreage, - 
49-15" n taie, 
Superiflf Street 
Dock Priipertj, - 



,500,000 



mppy NEW m 



The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



1, 
1, 



Lots for Sale as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 

501 West Superior Street. 



AllofWhichisWellinlts 
Way, but Practice is> 
the Thing. 



You Can All «'Get There" if 

You Try, so You haJ 

Better Try 



HARWOOD'S 

Citj Transportation Freight and Express, 



DRAYS. 

Offi(ie, 17 First Avenue West. 



THE NEW YEARS LEAF. 

IChicagu Herald. J 
Just now is the time when the averaire man 
HoKins to pro.<p(.<tively ii.cniallv nlS^ ^° 
A> the aiiiiUit! swoariiiK on sea^jn dm'ws n«»u. 
Of the leaf hell turn over the flm of the ^^r" 
Kverythingr that Is wron^ from his life l^'li 
ellace, 

'^"^u^l"^*" tbafs unjust in his tlioug-hte have 

He's sure he has power all evil to shun 

flono" ^*'* ^ """* ^ ^''®° ''*® business is 

Hy.H'i" V."^'"'' »"]"»''t- his new plan broken In. 
He d better not tarry a dav to besrin, 

fast* should not use the leaves too 

^ ''Lsi°' "-'""P'***' *•"'* y^' t»»e leaf turned for 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



—IN- 



SUPERIOR 



500 Acres at Haywood Sta- 
tion, on line of Omaha, with 
800,000 feet of pine, at $7 
per acre; one-half cash. 

280 Acres in sections 4 and 
5, tp. 47, at $17 per acre. 
2 Lots on West Sixth street. 

10 " " Eighth " 

Block 7, West 15th street. 
" 10, " " «• 

Block on East 23d str.et; 
very cheap. 

I have a deal in acres that 
will take but S600, in which 
there is big money. Come and 
«ea me. I have the exclusive 
sale of the above. 




& 



WEST DULUTH. 



HARRIS BROTHERS. 



DULUTH 



CAUTION 

factory : this r>rn»o.-to tu,, . . 



"I .^jft ■ raiised the officer. 



and 
him "shngiDK out his tea' 

as he expressed it, I was 

pretty sure to spill some of the contents 
over him. On one occasion, I shudier 
to recall it even now, the ship was roll- 
ing heavily; and I was handintf the milk 
to him. Becoming transfixed with his 
eye, and the vessel j^iving a violent lurch 
at the same moment, I poured about a 
quart down his vest and over his knees 
1 think he would have killed me if his 
mate had not interposed. He was a 
Portuguese, a brutal wretch, and tyran- 
nized over all that were younger or 
weaker than himself. 

The most despicable piece of cruelty I 

ever remember to have seen was one 

time when the order was "splice the 

mainbrace," which every sailor knows 

means to come and get the regular ration 

of liquor. All hands were helped to a 

small glass each of rum. Some Italian 

steerage passengers were watching the 

operation with great interest. One of 

them, a poor wretch, the lids of his eyes 

livid with some disease, was asked if he 

would like some. The man said he 

would, and the boatswain, pouring out a 

g'assful, tossed it in the poor fellow's 

face, almost blinding him, and then 

laughed immoderately to see his victim 

writhe and scream. No one ventured to 

remonstrate. 

The third day out the weather becom- 
ing rough, I suffered horribly with sea 
sickness. In this condition, nearly half 
dead, I was found by the bo'sun, who at 
once administered his remedy for all 
troubles, a good thrashing. We had a 
terribly rough passage. On Christmas 



_ ?h^ TNe man took my overcoat 
tc< iibrirtffjH iree swing, and I hauled 
<M fa sTnJsh >fo. 1. He began to back 
off and apologize, and when I let up on 
him the other man and my 850 overcoat 
had disappeared." 
"Put-up job," observed the officers. 
"Will 1 ever see mv coat agaia?" 
"Probably not." ' 

"What's best for me to do— go tearing 
around and give it away that I was 
played, or walk around serenely and try 
to look inocentr" 
"It's for you to say." 
"Well, I'll try to adopt the latter 
course, and if you should meet me any- 
where and there is any one around don't 
say a word about the coat. Just ask me 
if we've bad lots of rain and mud in our 
town, refer to the influenza— kinder 
talk as if you never saw me before, and 
111 s<jrter stroll up town, and whistle, 
and try to look as if I knew the ropes 
and waa up to all the latest tricks."— 
Detroit Free Press. 



WINTER QUIPS. 

A .SatUfactory Explanation. 

[Philadelphia Press.] 
•'No. no:" she cried with cheeka aflame, 

Cmo his plea for one earess; 
Hut he t«K>li the kisses all the same 
And tuld her he was not to blame. 

For double nejratives mean "yes." 

Old £laHtic. 

W-bat gTfvloiis expansion has 

Old Promise— mores the sorrow, 
Jor when tomorrow comes to pass. 
Why, still we say -"tomorrow." 

Comfort ft»r the Homely. 

In lovo, e'en with ii iiomely man 

A girl may be enchanted; 
He 8 more thun apt to plea«.' a maid 
Who nhows he is a bit afraid. 

And don't take tbinijrA for granted. 

By Froxy. 

^uiTKest your theme, let others Ught 
lo priiye your argumeutti are ri^ht 
Hecall how, in your youthful tricks. 
One push upset a mw of bricks. 

One CauHe lor Gratitude. 

nie man wlio notes the maid who imirs 

Hor jfrace by conset May, 
May thank his row of lucky stars 

Ho isn't built that way. 



HabitH of the Terrapin. 

Washington Post: A paragrapn which 
IS going the rounds of the papers just 
now. that terrapins are being shipped 
from Savannah, Ga., to New York, where 
they are sold for $25 a dozen, attracted 
the attention yesterdav of Congressman 
Gibson of Maryland, the terrapin e.xpert 
of congress. "Southern terrapin," was 
the handsome congressman's Hrst com- 
ment, "are not *he genuine diamond- 
packs, and have not the flavor of the real 
bird. The Southern terrapin lives in 
fresh or brackish water, is livelv through- 
out the winter, and totyd may be found 
in itsentrails at any time. The diamond- 
back, on the contrary, goes into winter 
quarters in the mud from the tirst frosts 
until the warm suns of April bring it 
out again. During this time it digests 
the food that it has taken into 
Its stomach, and its interior is 
always i>erfectly clean. Its flesh 
has a peculiar and delicious flavor 
that no other species of terrapin has, 
and no one who has become accustomed 
to the real article can be imposed upon." 
'•Is there any way of keeping up the 
supply to meet thedemand'f 

"Terrapin fanuing thus far has not 
been a financial success, although I un- 
derstand that a party of capitalists have 
gone into the business somewhere in the 
vicinity of the Dismal Swamp. I have 
had some experience and it did not pay 
me. Then, some friends of mine stocked 
a salt-water jwnd of about two acres 
vvith -2.500 terrapin, paid a man to feed 
them on crabs during the summer, fitted 
"P a iDi«e shelving bank of white sand in 
which the terrapins could lay their eggs, 
put a palisade around the pond to keep 
the terapins from crawling awav, and 
provided every comfortfor their prisoners 
But you know that it takes six or seven 
years for a terapin to become of mark- 
etable size, and for two or three years 
my friends were able to sell only a very 
few of their 2500. Those that they sold, 
however, easily brought from 8:10 to f f2 
adozen in New York. Curiously enough, 
though, tliey could never find any of the 
young ones, so that the stock was not 
being replenished. Finally, there c.ime 
a freshet, or a high tide, and the whole 
terrapin outfit went out to sea. Thet. my 
friends became discouraged, and I lost 
interest in terrapin farming myself." 



SPECIAL 



eHRGAINS 




160 Acres in 9-49-15. 

80 " 9-49-15. 

40 " 1-49-15. 

320 •« 35-48-15. 

80 " Water Front, 

48-15. 

2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $2000. 



W. L. Dougrias' name and the price 

are stamped on the bottom of all Shoe? 

"W L noiio-W^;.r^ A -^^ *"" '""'^ ^ "" '*'*"'• o"" «ff*^'« J'»" shoe." withou 

^^^arersofW T n^?,tl J- oi""' ^'"'^ K^^""^ annually in this country by the 
wantConeS; B:,tS?w.?\^^.®r*'°^^^ In ordering bj- mail state whether you 

mms§mmm§ 

W. L. DOUGLAS 

S3 SHOE CEH^««EH. 

Isa fino spiniless calf shoe, with DoneoU 
top8 au.I Oak I.eathe'r bott<-iUfi. They are 
iiiado III < onKiess, Button and Laoo on ton- 

l!r..n<<hTo.'l>a8tN,in«l7.eg from « to 11. in. 
eluding: linlfKiztiiiniid in aU width-. Ifvou 
have been ,.„yi„^- from *.5 to »6 for shoes 
of this quality do not do so longer. One pair 
will«earas long as two pairs of ooiuinon 
•hoes sold l,y deah-r» that are not warranted 
by the niniiiifaeturer. 

Onr elaiins for this shoe over all other MS 
Shoes advertised, are : 
1st. It eoiitains better materiaL 

It K more stylish, bett«r flttlnr anu 

durable. "* 

It Kive» l>etter general aatigfaction. 

It eoKls more money to make. 

1 1 8a V es more money for the consumer. 

It iH sold by more dealers thruuebout 

the IT. s. 

It'i i;reat snecess is due to merit. 

It eannot l>e duplicated by any other 

nianuf-'ieturer. 

It in the best In the worid, and has a 

laiTrei- d'.'inand than any other 93 

shoe nd\ertis«d. 

•°'i?°°.'^'" •**" P*«d toany pe.-son who will prove the above stalcmente to be ontme. 
The lollowhig Lines will I.e f„,.n,l fo hn of the Same Qnality of EzoeUenoe. 

ClNiixK H.iXD-SEWKU, which takes the place of cus- 
toni-ma ie shoes Hint .-:o.st from $7 to it). j- «. ».ua- 

I?«„*1^J^'^.^^^ ^^^ **^'^y HAND-SKWI5D WjxT 

»* MiOl.. iiquals custom-made shoes costing from 16 to 28. 

VOR I'OLICEMKN. Railroad Men and Letter Carriers all 
\ve.,r tlici:i. JMiiooth inside as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. No Tacks 
>r W UK 1 hrcan to hurt tlie tect. •!««.»» 

IS rx>:Xt ELLEU 1 OR IIKAATC WEAK. Best Calf Shoe 

for tl.'j prici . »— «»uwB 

VVORKINGM.AX'S. Is lliu best in the world for rornrfi wear • 
one p.iiriiuuiit to \vca:a man ayear. ' 

IS EQl .11. TO SHOES THAT COST FROM ms TO S3.80. 

One i).iir will wear longer than any shoe ever stild at the price 
FOR BOYS is thr> host School Shoe In the world. 

SI . 75 SHOE n^'b^f s'h'ol'^!? Ko^r *'"' *"'^" ^>-' =* ^^-« '» -» 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFF»CE 

17 First Avenue West- 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTHA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished 



ROOM 4U PASTOREI-SIEIISOII BLOCK, 

DULUTH, . . MINN 



Certificate of Amenijeil 



ARTICIIS OF INCORPORATION 



OF L^KE8IDE LAND COMPANY. 



»d. 

3d. 

4th. 
Sth. 

eui. 

7th. 
(tth. 

9th. 



$5.00 SHOE 
S4.00 SHOE 
S3.50 SHOE 

S2.50 SHOE 
$2.25 SHOE 
$2.00 SHOE 
$2.00 SHOE 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, I 
County ok St. Louis, f **• 

KNOW AM, MKN BT THESE PRESENT? 
That vo. 0/.)ia P. Stearns, president, 
iiuil Wm. C Sarjfout, scc-retary, of Lakesi.lr- 
liUiid company, a corporation orirunized u:.' 
doiii)? business under the laws of Minnesota 
beinif duly end severally sworn, do hereby cer- 
tity and dcii;>se that atarcKuUir nioctUw ol 
the shareho: ders of the said Lakeside Laud 
company, duly called and held at the offices of 
saidwmpaiiy at Duluth. Minnesota, on the 
lourlh day < f January, ItistO, at two o'clock in 
the alternoou of said day, the articles of Incor- 
IKiratiou ot said corporation were amended so 
as t« lucreasEs the capital stock of said corpor- 
ation from one hundred and tweutv-flve thoii- 
sund dollars to Ave hundred thousaud dol- 
lars and 8) as to increa.se the number 
of shares m he capital stock of said corpor- 
ation Irom tvelve hunared and fifty to Ave 
thoasand, by amending Article 3 of said 
original arthtlesof incorporation, which tlxe- 
theainount of the capital stock of said cor- 
IHjration at cue hundred and twenty-flve thou- 
sand dollars, so as to road as follows, to-wlt • 



"The auiou 
iwration sha 
lufs, (*500,UO0 
board of dire 

And by a: 
articles of Im 
ber of shares 
ixirpation a1 
to read as fol 



ARTICLE 3. 

nt of the capital slock of the cor- 
1 be Ave hundred thousaud dol- 
01)); to be paid in on cill of the 
L'tors." 

neuding Article 7 of said original 

:orporatiou, which tlxes the nuni- 

in the capital stock of said cor- 

twelve hundred and flfty. so as 

^ows, to-wit: 



Af{TlCLE 7. 



"The number of shares in the capital stock 
of t he corpor ition shall be Ave thousand {h.mh 
?^il?Mi^^'*'^,^\. value of one hundred dollars 
(iflOO OU), which shares when fully paid up 
shall be noi -assessable." 

That there were present at said meeting 
who voted It favor of said amendments a 
majority in number of the shareholders of 
said coriKjri .tion, who held a majority in 
amount of th; shares f)f stock of the same. 
,„ ,, „ OZOKA P. Steaiins, 

Wm. C. Sakoi NT, President, 

beer stary. 



FOR 
LADIES. 



AM ma<le in Congress, Button and Lace. 

W. L DOUGLAS $3 AND $2 SHOES ..„.., 

Both Ladies' Shoes are made in sizes from i to 7, including half sizes, and B, C, D, E and l-'F widths! 

STYLES OF LADIES* .SHOES. 
''The French Opera," "The Spanish Arch Opera," "The Anierienn rv.>».„».. 
Sense," "The Medium Conimon-Sense." All made in Button in ih- T ^t-^T. 1 "* 
AIM. French Opera in Front Lace, on «3 Shoe o„V. *"**"" "" *•»* ^*^^^ styles. 

Consumers should remember that W. L. DOUGLAS i«fli(> 1ircrf.cf ,„^ «„i. cu «. i ^ 
in the world, supplying shoes Uirea tern, fac"^ th^h:n'|iiYfhe'mid'.n^^^^^ 



weaicr. 



: 1- -bovGijiarir^y^^ktonrvu^ 



FOR SALE BY SUFFEL& CO. 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN. 

ARCHITECT, 

Booms 510. 511 and 51?, Ouluth Onion National Bank Building. 



Subscribed md sworn to before me this'th 
day of Januai y, 1890. W . E. Per ny. 

Notary Public, ' 
M . . 1 Q . °'- ">"'s county, Slinnesota. 
Notarial Seal, 

St. Louis Co , Minn. 



OFFICE C'F REGISTER OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF idlNNESOTA, I 
CouKTY oi St. Louis. ( **■ 
I hereby certify that tliewUhln articles were 
filed in this ofiicefor record on the »th day ol 
January, A. 0. im), at 3:10 o'clock p. m., and 
was duly recarded in Book G of Miscellaneous 
page t). 

Amos Shephard, 
Register of Deeds. 



Hidden Armoor, 

We wonder how some men can look. 

At W(x.', and never mind it; 
Srt^ "^'"^^Kc c«;ases to atitouud 
When some time after we have found 
A bank account behind It. 



Waked up Effect iiaily. 
A lethargic, dqpnant condititon of the 
liver 18 hardly KTbe overcome with dras- 
tic cathartics and nauseous cholagoguee 
A gentler, pleasanterund far more effect- 
ive means exists of arousing the organs 
when Homnolent. This is Hostetter's 
btomach Bitters, vouched for by the 
medical fraternity, tested by the public 
rormany years. A resumption by the 
biliary organ of its secretive function, 
with the activity attendant upon health 
a return to regularity of the bowels, and 
a renewal of digestion, are the no less 
happy and certain results of using the 
Bitters systematically. Its laxative 
effect IS never painful and drenching, its 
tendency being rather to perpetuate 
regularity than to produce a copious 
attion. Malaria, nervousness, debilitv 
kidney troubles and neuralgia it sub- 
dues effectually. 



Terms on Houses, 14 Cash, Balance 
], 2 and 3 years at 8 Percent. 




STATE OF M INNESOTA. I 
Dbpahtmen r or State. ( 
I hereby cer ify that the within Instrumen t 
was filed for rocord In this office on the Uth 
day of January A. D. 1««. at H o'clock a 
m., and was di ly recorded in book V of incor- 
porations on p ige -"TO. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 



Jan. 13,14,15.18. 17, 18,30. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty, jefir Good workm . i- 
ship guaranteed. 



ELY. 

First class In every way. 
Finest samp e room In 
connection. 



MINNESOTA. 

Newly refitted, 
room In Mwn. Livery in 



WILI lAM QRANT, Prop 
Open Novomber I. 



NEW HOTEL. 

THE 



HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 

Duluth, Minn. 




209 East Superior Street, 



MEMBERS OF THE 



H. P, MILLS. 



410 MD 411 riBST MTIOIIIIL BAIIK BUILOIIIE, 



DDLDTH CLEARING HOOSE ASSOCIATION. 



St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4th md ^Vaalilnipton Stu. 

On Cable Car L no. Best Table in the Noii^ 
west. Haies »3.( and Upwards. 

W. H. Barnks. Maaager. 



American Exchange Baik • 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

S300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

250,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100,000 

26,000 



Mortgages flegotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 

lioweel rates tor all sizes and grades of 
security. Befo-e borrowing elsewhere In- 
quire of 

N. J, UPHAM, 

Unde r First Nat. Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
ofth»year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance Is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so Impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because vs^ offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you aM 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 

Your real(ty) friends, 



C. L LOVEn 4 CO., 



32 Fargusson BIdg. 



















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DtJIiUTH EVENrerO HEBAUD^ JAKtJABY 18 1890. 



I 



DULUTH - AND - SUPERIOR - REAL - ESTATE. 



\ 



I am Offering some very good Investments 

Perfect Facilities for Showing 



on Both Sides of the River and 
Property to Investors. 



have 




im ONLY ON COMMISSION 



So that Parties Listing Property for sale with me may rely upon earnest work on 

my part to dispose of their Property to their Interest. 



; 

■ 

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■ ■ ■■ » 

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OFFICES : ROOM 35 FARGUSSON BUILDING. DULUTH. OPPOSITE EUCLID HOTEL SUPERIOR. 



THE ENNUI IN SOCIEIl 



Why Duluth Society is Not as 
Gay as It Might Other- 
• wise Be. 



Feel 



People 


Are 


ill and 


Don 


t 


Much 


Like 


Cele- 








brating. 







Musical Notes; Minor Events; 

West End Social 

Affairs. 



If society is not dying the premonitory 
symptoms of an early demise are as- 
suredly at fault. The holiday season, 
contrary to custom, was ushered in 
'midst rather decorous silence, and ran 
its short course unaccompanied, except 
in rare instances, by the seductive con- 
comitanta of music or supper. Society 
shrugged its dimpled shoulders, and joy- 
ously proclaimed that within the next 
few weeks Vanity Fair would awaken, 
and that each week would be a succes- 
sion of "events" in consequence. But 
these brijjrht promises show no imme- 
diate signs of fultillment. The decorous 
but discreet chaperons are sighing over 
the dismal outlook; the younger ele- 
ment of the 400 are growing alarmed at 
the death of social diversion, and with 
single accord society musically voices 
the hope that an oasis will yet Fje found 
in the dreary desert of lethargy which is 
not even relieved by more than an occa- 
sional afternoon reception or progressive 
euchre. 



Probably the trouble, if one wants to 
find an excuse, is in the general illness. 
Said a lady who spent yesterdav after 
noon in calling: "I never saw so many 
sick people. I hardly visited a house 
where there was not some one sick abed 
or just recfjvering from an attack of 
fever, chill or grip." It's utt«>rly 
amazing. It's true people can't 
dance or play cards, or lounge in 
the smokingroom and reel off stories 
when they're in bed with the 
wrestling to keep it off. So 
good cause for its dullness. 



grip or 
society has 



The lack of fashionable 
winter sports in Duluth 
doubted cause for the decadence 
gaiety in home society. The seasons 



interest in 
is one un 
of 
of 



the past when Dame Nature early 
covered the earth with a generous mantle 
of snow, people were more prone to glee- 
fully skate or slide or ride, but that is 
no more. Even the talk of a nice snow- 
shoe club or curling club is quieted and 
heard no more at alL There is a skating 
club, but as yet it has done little in a 
social way. There is still some chance. 
It IS beUeved, for a snowshoe club. \ 
few sleigh rides have taken place this 



to- 
the 



EvenU of a, We«k. 

Several from Duluth are present 
day in St Paul, at a convention , of 
Epworth league. 

About twenty friends of Judge and 
Mrs. O. P. Stearns Wednesday organ- 
ized a little surprise party and assembled 
at their residence to celebrate the 
judge's 5i)th birthday. Card playing. 



dancing and refreshments were indulged 
in. 

A very pleasant party was given Fri- 
day night by the Young Mens club at 
Ingalls hall in honor of Miss Lottie 
Jones, a well known young lady of Du- 
luth. There was good music, a good 
door and a good time. 

The regular meeting of the Ladies 
Literature class Tuesday, was one of the 
most interesting ever held. Its subject 
was "Famous Literary Women," and 
there was much of interest brought out. 
Elaborate preparations have been 
made for the social to be given on the 
occasion of the annual meeting of Pil- 
grim church Tuesday evening. Invita- 
tions have been sent out to all connected 
with the church, nearly 400 families, and 
there will be an elaborate supper served 
before the meeting. 

P. A. Burdick, notices of whose extra- 
ordinary eloquence as a temperance ora- 
tor have appeared in The Herald during 
the week, will lecture tomorrow night at 
Temple Opera, beginning at 7;40. There 
will be no admission fee. A large choir 
will be present to assist the lecturer. 
There will be no services at many city 
churches because of this lecture. 

The wedding of Col. Thomas Cully- 
ford and Miss Annie Gordon occurred 
Monday afternoon at the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Wm. R. Stone, Rev. W. M. 
Barker officiating. It was a very quiet 
affair, only about a half dozen relatives 
being present. Mr. and Mrs. Cullyford 
left for Chicago, where they were the 
next day joined by xMr. and Mrs. W. R. 
Stone, Mrs. Stone being a sister 
of Mrs. Cullyford. The party will then 
take an extended tour through Mexico 
and the South, being absent about two 
months. 

Amon^ Liuluth People. 
Mr. Willis M. Roberts returned from 
the East Thursday night. 

Mr. M. B. Harrison has returned from 
a two weeks Eastern trip. 

Mr. John Seagog has returned from 
Council Bluffs with his bride. 

Mrs. E. P. Emerson has returned from 
a visit to New York and Boston. 

Lawyer S. E. Cheeseman has gone to 
Ashville, N. C, to spend the winter. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank S. Dunbar have 
gone east to be absent some weeks. 

Mi«8 Lucia Judd has returned to 
Lake City to continue her studies. 

Mr. Louis Loeb of the firm of Heller 
&. Loeb has left for the Pacific coast. 

Mrs. J. T. Condon is visiting friends in 
the East where she expects to remain 
for a month or so. 

Mr. H. S. Wilson, of E^ast Saginaw is 
in Duluth again looking after business 
interests and visiting friends. 

Misses Vachon and Mayor and Mr. 
John Mayor, who have been visiting the 
Misses Ready have gone home. 

Mr. George A- French of the Rainey 
«fe French company, is on his way East 
on a trip of busine.se and pleasure. 

Mr. C. B. Wagner, with Porter <St 
Sons will shortly leave for Chicago, to 
develope a budding talent for elecution. 
Mibs Marj- Stathem, sister-in-law of 
Juilge Morris, who has been visiting in 
Duluth for the past four months, has re- 
turned to her home in Lynchburg, Va. 

Mr. Mrs. W. A. McGonagle have re- 
turned from Methuen, Mass., and Phil- 
adelphia Pa., where they have been 
visiting. Mrs. McGonagle has been ab- 
sent some time. 

Superintendant of schools Denfield 
went down to St Paul last night to at- 
tend the Educational association con- 
vention, the executive committee of 
which body he is a member. 

Mr. Horace V. Winchell of Minneapo- 
lis, well known in Duluth on account of 
his connection with the geological sur- 
vey, was married in Ann Arbor Wednes- 
day to his cousin. Miss Ida B. Winchell. 
Rev. Father Buh, Roman Catholic 
pastor of Tower, has been appointed 



vicar general of the new diocese of Du- 
luth. He has been in Minnesota since 
18C7, and has done good work among the 
Indians, as well as among the whites. 

Miss Barnes, the two Misses Moore 
and Miss M. Taylor are a quartet of 
teachers badly afflicted with the prev- 
alent malady, grip. Miss Bailey, Miss 
Krelwitz and Miss F. Burbank are offici- 
ating in their places as substitutes. 

Mr. J. C. Morse of the Miiineouta Iron 
company, Bnd Mrs. A. C. Ely, his daugh- 
ter, have been in the city this week. Mr. 
Morse came up with a private car to 
take Manager Bacon to New York, but 
he was not well enough to go this week. 

West Ead Social. 

The Norwegian Lutheran society met 
Thursday evening and elected officers. 
The new church building will cost $10,- 
000, while the lot on which it stands cost 
$3000, of which a balance of over $5000 
remains to be paid. The officers elected 
were as follows: Secretary, H. Thorsen; 
treasurer, S. A. Siverts; trustees, H. 
Grytdahl, John Anderson and A. Elling- 
son; deacons, K. Peterson, John Olson 
and John Hanson; superintendent of 
Sunday school, John Hanson; assistant, 
Peter C. Peterson; organist, R. Hanson. 

The masquerade at Erickson's rink 
last night was very successful. The 
costumes were elegant and the managers 
deserve credit for getting up such a 
pleasant affair. Mrs. Thomas Summers 
won thelirst prize, Fred Stiegler the sec- 
ond, W. C. Kennebrook the third. 

Tonight a masquerade will be held in 
Twentieth Avenue rink for which two 
prizes are offered. 

The social week at the West End has 
been very dull. Next week promises to 
be more brilliant. 

The West End social club will hold its 
sixth reception next Wednesday evening. 

Mr. Swan Carlson and Miss Ida M. 
Johnson were married Thursday even- 
ing by Rev. C. J. Colin. There were 
about 100 invited guests present. The 
wedding supper was served in the hall. 
They will reside in the home on 
Eighteenth avenue, recently furnished 
by Mr. Carlson. 



some of the light operas. The organi 
zation will include some of the best mus- 
ical talent in the city. 

A MAIDEN'S QUERY. 

ITranslated from the Swedish by Mary H . 
Wheeler.] 
Lovost thou for beauty, s sake? 

Love me not, ah nol 
Love the Sun: 8ee in Its wake 
Golden locks iu splendor on the blue out- 
flow: 

Lovest thou for youth's sweet sake? 

Love me not, ah, rjo: 
Love the sprinK. Her roses take. 
Ever freshly blooming. Mine will shortly 
go. 

Lovest thou for wealth, for gold? 

Love me not, ah. no; 
Lore the sea. Its waters bold 
Corai groves and pearls and trolden sands 

below. 

Lovest thou for love's own sake? 

O, then love thou me: 
Love have I that naught can shake. 
It has been thine only, thine will ever be. 



TWENTY lEABS' WEATHER 



Record of 
of the 



the Twenty Years' 
Duluth Signal 
Service. 



BURNS' BIRTHDAY. 



MomIc and Miuiriaog. 
The concert last night given by local 
talent at the Bethel was very satisfac- 
tory. Miss French, soprano of the First 
Presbyterian church, appeared the first 
time in solo work before a Duluth public, 
and she sung herself right into favor. 
She has a very sweet voice, and will 
always be sure of a welcome. Miss 
Slauson sang a solo which was a very 
finished performance. C. B. Wagar, in 
addition tj his musical ability, 
has considerable elocutionary talent, 
which he exhibited by his reading of 
a portion of Shakespeare's "Twelfth 
Night" J. W. Johnson sang most ac- 
ceptably as he always does. Chas. A. 
Collins demonstrated the fact that he is 
a pianist in all that the term implies. 
Mr. Hodge whose sweet tenor voice is 
always pleasant sung in a quartet, and 
other mixed parts. The affair was a 
highly successful and enjoyable one all 
round. 

The next Mozart concert will be held 
Friday night at Temple Opera. The pro- 
gram which was published yesterday 
will comprise musical and vocal num- 
bers by both professional artists and 
amateurs. The numbers are most care- 
fully selected, and nothing but what is 
meritorious has been given a place. 
The details are in the hands of Mr. Ton- 
ning, subject to the approval of the 
music committee of the association. 
The Apollo club met at the studio of 
H. P. Robinson. And the members 
present decided that to die was not 
gain, and the organization from now on 
take a new lease of life. 

A new musical organization will be 
formed shortly under the leadership of 
Frank Hoare, for the purpose of giving 



The Program for the Annual Celebration 
at Daluth. 

The 121st anniversary of Robert Burns 
will be fittingly celebrated by Clan 
Stewart on next Friday evening at the 
St. Louis hotel. The program will be 
found below, and speaks for itself: 

March to the dinlngroom, led by Clan Piper 
McLean. 

Chairman Chief Simon Clark 

Croupier Tanist W, A. Cunt 

Blessing Clansman, Kev. B.Mitchell 

Supper. 
Chairman's Address. 

Son? Glee Club 

Waltz song— "Bird on the Wing" Auguste 

Mrs. Franklin Paine. 

Recitation— "Robert Bums" 

„ Master Thomas Chalmers 

Toast Robert Burns 

Clansman Colin Thomsan. 

^'^g "Tam Glenn," 

Mrs. R. G. McKenzle. 

Dance High land Fling 

Prof. J. S. Moon. 

Toast "Our Adopted Country " 

Clansman K. M. Uuuter. 
Song "Selected- 
Glee Club. 
Selections on Bagpipes, "March of the Mc- 
Keiizie HigTilaiiders" and "Lord Pan- 

mure's March" 

.. Clansmeu J. S. Moon and Colin Thomson 

Toast "The Ladies" 

Clansman Koliert Crorabie. 

Recitation "Tlie Great Hielau' Bagpiiies" 

Clansman Angus Gibson. 

"Auld Lang Syne." 

By the Company. 



Some Facts of Local Interest 

As Well as News to 

Others, 



although they are yet classified among 
the "unknowable" atmospheric phe- 
nomena. Most of the winds that pass 
over Duluth come from the northwest, 
and originate along the upper Pacific 
coast in British America, or 
along the border. All winds 
blow towards a storm center. 
As stated before, Duluth was made one 
of the twenty-four stations first estab- 
lished in the United States. Sergeant 
H. Bessant was appointed in charge. On 
Nov. 1, 1870, the first observation was 
made here, at the same day the first 
were made in this country. The 
office was opened Oct. 18, in 
the old Edmunds block, on the north- 
east corner of Lake avenue and Superior 
street. Since 1883 the signal office has 
been located in the Metropolitan build- 
ing on West Superior street. Sergeant 
Fallon is now compiling statistics which 
will cover the observations at this station 
since its establishment, and to him The 
Herald is indebted for the following. 

In giving these observations, the fact 
at once becomes apparent that Duluth 
is blessed with a climate that is not ex- 
celled in the West. Since 1870 the 
highest recorded temperature was on 
July 1, 1883, the thermometer register- 
ing 99 . Last year it was 86=. The 
highest annual temperature since 1870 
was ia 1878, when it was 45.3 \ the low- 
, , , , ,^ , , est being 36.3° in 1875 and 1885. By 

world bad had what approximates the I months the maximum mean was 71 
signal service of today, but until the 



The Tornado, Cyclone and 
Blizzard; An Eye-wit- 
ness' Tale. 



The first observations by the United 
States signal service bureau were taken 
Nov. 1, 1870, from twenty-four stations, 
Duluth being among them. For cen- 
turies past the maritime nations of the 



bureau was established under the direc- 
tion of Gen. Myers, nothing like a sys- 
tematic observation of the wind and 
weather had ever been made. The serv- 
ice is now under the direction of the 
war department, but there is a move- 
ment on foot to make it a civil bureau. 
Of all the instruments employed in 
the signal service the barometer is the 
most important. Tlie others are: The 
anemometer, which registers the velocity 
of the wind; the anamoscope or weather 



— - "1 
July, 1878, the minimum being .05' in 

January, 1885. The coldest day recorded 
in the past twenty years was below, on 
Jan. 2, 1885. The minimum tempera- 
tures recorded since 1870 are: Dec. 22, 
1870, 22 below; Jan. 18, 1871, 18 ; Dec. 
27, 1871, 22 ; Jan. 25, 1873, 26 ; Dec. 29 
and 31, 1874, 24 ; Jan. 9, 187.5, 38 ; Dec. 
16, 1876, 30 ; Jan. 14, 1877, 27 ; Dec. 3, 
1878, 14 ; Dec. 25, 1879. 34 ; Dec. 28, 
1880, 27; Jan. 14, 1881, 27 ; 
Jan. 23, 1882, 24'; Jan. 22, 
1883, 35' ; Dec. 18, 1884, 32 ; Jan. 2, 1885, 
41 ; Jan. ,3, 1886, .32 ; Jan. 30, 1887, 28 ; 



Grand Skating Tournament. 

A grand skating tournament will take 
place Saturday evening, Jan. 18, at the 
West End Parlor Skating rink. Twenty- 
first avenue west and Superior street 
between twelve young ladies. A fine 
gold medal will be awarded to the win- 
ner. Four competent judges will be on 
hand to award the prize. Walkers Mili- 
tary band will be on hand. Everybody 
should try and attend as it will be the 
finest match ever seen in Duluth. .\d- 
misaion, gents, 25c; ladies, 15c; children, 
10c. The match will take place at 9 
o'clock sharp. Medal can be seen at 
rink. T. M. Ericson, Prop. - 

Capt S. G. Johnson,. Manager. 

Do You Want Cloaks. 

Big auction sale at St Louis' old 
ingroom, commencing Saturday at 
p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. 



din- 
2to 



Large and complete list of Endion lots 
for sale by E. W. Murkell, Hotel Sf. Louis 
block, ground floor. 

Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

Do You Want Cloakii. 

Big auction sale at St Louis' old din- 
ingroom, commencing Saturday at 2 to 
6 p. m., and 7 to 9 p. m. 



wind; rain and snow guages,the exposed 
and wet bulb thermometers, which ob- 
serve the relative humidity of the at- 
m(isphere; the maximum and minimum 
thermometers; and the Richards ther- 
mograph, which records the tempera- 
ture. The self-registering anemometer 
records every mile of wind made on a 
cylinder covered with a paper form and 
turned by clockwork. 

But the signals displayed from the 
tall Hag staff on the Metropolitan build- 
ing are the most familiar sights of the 
signal office to The Herald's readers. 
The flag or streamer there displayed 
tells to the observant eye the coming of 
storm or rain, heat or cold. The Herald 
has fre(iuently interpreted these flags. 
.\ white flag with black center indicates 
the approach of a cold wave. .\ yellow 
pennant, when hoisted, indicates that in- 
formation imiKirtant to vesselmon has 
l)een received. 

Many inventions have recently come 
into use, that give the reports of the 
signal ser\ice a reliability they did not 
I)08sos8. When the bureau came first 
into existence the temperature was 
marked as the maximum or minimum 
"observed." Since 1874 the self- register- 
ing thermometer has acurately recorded 
the temperature. By the extension of 
the telegraphic service the bureau has 
bei-'ome very accurate in its refKjrts. Its 
warnings of coming storms have been of 
incalculable service, and many liv«s and 
millions of dollars worth of f)roperty 
have been saved. 

The yearly reports have been of great 
value to scientists, who, by them, are 
enabled to approximate the causes of 
many metorological phenomena which, 
until the estal)lishment of the bureau, 
every one had been in ignorance of. So, 
too, the bureau has given the world a 
better idea of the causes of tornados, 



vane, which shows the direction of the Jan. 15, 1888. .34 ; Feb. 23, 1889, 30" ; up 
" " ■ ' ■ - toJan. 18, 1890, 19'. This is an average 

coldest temperature for nineteen years 
of only 30' below. 

In 1879 was the heaviest rainfall re- 
corded for the past two decades. That 
year 45.28 inches fell; the lowest was in 
1885, it then being onlv 19.96 inches. On 
the 16th of September, 1881, Duluth saw 
her fiercest storm, the wind on that day 
having a maximum velocity of 78 niles 
an hour. .\t Mt Washington the records 
show 200 miles and at Sault Ste. Marie 
130 miles. 

Duluth is so situated that she knows 
nothing from experience of the 
dread foes of the prairie settler, the tor- 
nado and the blizzard. The one is as 
fierce as the other and equally to be 
feared, for to be caught in the niidst of 
either generally means death. The bliz- 
zard is the terror of the Northwestern 
winter. In the intense eold of North 
Dakota, Montana and British America, 
where the temperatures sometimes fall 
as low as 75 —a United States station at 
Poplar River, Montana recorded this 
temperature Jan. 2, 1885, while through 
Dakota it was 45 and 50 the blizzard 
is most ti be dreade<l It comes uj) as 
quickly as the tornado; and woe to the 
traveler who loses his way in it. So 
cold and strong is this wind, that it 
crumbles the snow in infiinitessimal icy 
atoms that sweep blindingly through 
the air. The wind comes up "suddenly, 
like a squall on a lake, and I have seen a 
crust, thick enough to bear up an ox, 
broken to pieces and ground as fine 
needle points in an hour. Some of these 
storms extend for days, and the prairie 
dweller who has failed to fill his house 
with provisions, in preparation, has a 
sorry time of it. It is usual to stretch 
ropes between houses and barns on the 
prairies to act as life lines. 

Of the tornado phenomena but little 



is knowr . However, the signal bureau 
has rendered great service in securing 
data from which the movements of these 
fierce vinds can be classified, so 
as to be studied by scientists. 
I well re member my first and only expe- 
rience w th a tornado. It occurred in 
the cental northwest in the month of 
August. The air in the valley wherein 
I lived suddenly became oppressively 
hot, while several hundred miles away 
the recoided temperature was low. The, 
heat was furnace like, and there was an 
oppressive heaviness to the atmosphere. 
About an hour after the heat became so 
apparent a small cloud a ppeared away 
up the valley. It rapidly grew large, 
and thro igh a telescope it could be seen 
to have a tumbling, swirling motion. A 
slight bri>eze fanned the cheek. The 
cloud wh Tied higher in the heaven, and 
in a few moments it coula be seen to Ije 
rushing cown between the bluffs. Long 
before i'. reached us we could hear 
a low roar, as of surf on 
a rocky beach. Rapidly it came on. 
we ran for our "cyclone cellar," but 
watched ,he stom until it struck us. 
One by oie the farm houses went out of 
view behi nd what seemed a turbulent, 
tumbling wall of smoky, yellow foam. 
The water fairly rolled from the mass, 
and the r )ar was deafening. When it 
struck th i house in which we were, it 
seemed ai though a flood had burst over 
our heads, we could not hear each other 
talk. In a few moments the worst was 
over, and we emerged from our place of 
safety. 1 he storm was still fierce, but 
in an hou r it was all over and the sun 
shone ags in. 

Slender pine splinters were found im- 
bedded in brick walls, so solidly that 
they were broken square off in being re- 
moved. Three freight cars on a side- 
track went blown a half mile to the ter- 
minus anc then across the prairie into a 
river. Th e bell of a demolished church 
was blowE ten feet out of plumb. Sev- 
eral houses were turned completely 
around on their foundation, and several 
large wine ow panes were carried over 1 
the prairit and were afterwards found to 
be unbroksn. Other curious things also 
took place J. S. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooma 

9583.33 

Will handle one of Thomas <& Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. Tacssig, 

Phoenix block. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the CJivil 
War" bound in appropriate fiaiBhingB at 
The Herald bindery. 

The Herald bindery has the beet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



Commercial binding and printing r»- 
oeives accarate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



B 



R 



R 



O 



W 



N 



O 



T 



A fine gold medal costing g25 is to be 
given to the most graceful lady skater at 
the West End Parlor skating rink. 
Twenty -first avenue and Superior street, 
next Saturday night. Remember this 
race, as it promises to be very exciting. 
Com peteni judges will decide the race. 
Everybodj come and have a good time. 
Capt S. G Johnson, manager; T. M. 
Erickson, ])roprietor. 

Smoke t le Endion cigar, the finest in 
the markm . W. A. Footk & Co. 



H 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



) 

^ 



.• 



—AND— 



E 



A Real Spook. 

A specia to one of our leading daily 
papers froia Cochrane, Wis., says: "For 
several years the existence of "a ghost 
has been reported here. Last Friday a 
party was organized to investigate. Ar- 
riving at the ghost's walk, we saw an 
object about 10 feet high and 6 or 7 
inches in diameter. It slowly advanced 
to within a rod of the most daring. 
Some of the party fled, but those who 
remained saw it suddenly disappear." 
No European family of ancient lineage 
and blood, with any pretentions to note, 
is without 1 veritable and well-authen- 
ticated ghost "The Burlington" is 
away ahead of any of its competitors in 
this respec, as well as in those of fast 
time, smoo hness of track, and elegance 
as j of equipme at This is recognized by the 
— ; traveling p ibhc generally, and allowed 

, by all who patronize the line. For tick- 

I ets, time tu bles, rates, and any informa- 
tion, addrejs agents of "The Burling- 

' ton" or coE necting lines, or write to W. 

j J. C. Kenyon, general passenger agent 
Chicago, Burlington & Northern railroad, 

I St Paul, ]y;inn. 




TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Beet in the World. 



G«t our prlcM and vou wlU be per- 
fectly satisfied . 



U 



19 West Superior Street 



DB:E.C.W0ls 

NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Spociflc for Hysteria, Dizziness. Fits, NeupalpU. Wake- 
fulness, Mental Drpressioti.Softenmtrof the Brain re- 
sultiiiiT in insanity anil lea<linK to misery dec-av and 
death Pnmature Old Ajre, Barrenness. Loss of Power 
m either sex. Involuntary Loiu<«i>. and Spertnatorrbcem 
■aused t.v over-exertion of the brain, M-lf-abuse or 
jver-indtilgrence Each box contains one month V treat- 

«ith ea<-h orde.- for six boxes, will »end pnrrhaser 
/iiarantDe to n-fund aionry if the treatment falla to 
<aire. Uiuu-antees iasned and KoBBUke aold ttOly hy 

Boyoe 4 Totmjui. Phoe&lx Drusr Store, and 
7 West Superior street, soie aceats, Duluth. 

MlDQ. 



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mjI.l7TH BVKKDirG HEBAUJ: JAIfTTAKT 18, 1890 



Caucus of the Duluth Board; 

a Favorable Bank 

Statement. 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



The market was more active today, on 
freer Belling and a decline in prices. The 
weakness which set in yesterday con- 
tinued for most of the day, lK>th here 
and yesterday. Holders of wheat every- 
where seemed to i>e seized with a sud- 
den desire to get rid of their holdings. 
The break was due to this free selling at 
ditferent markeU), and the added cause 
that there are few features of strength 
anywhere in the present situation. 

Opening prices for May here were }^ 
below last nijjhfs close. There was a 
further decline of }^ during the session, 
foUowetl by a slight improvement. (Jash 
wheat wa& dull, with prices f^^ below 
yesterday. No. 1 hard cash closed at 
TjJ»2 and No. 1 northern at 76, both with- 
out sales. No. 2 northern regularly sold 
and clotjed at ~'2^n. January closed at 
79 for No. 1 hard "and 76 for No. 1 north- 
ern, both nominal. May opened at 83 "g, 
sold down to 83 's, firmed up and closed 
at S3' 2 bid, Mav No. 1 northern closed 
at 80^0. 



morning and evening he will speak at 
the church. 

W. T. Reese of St. Paul, and J. W. 
Schenvinborn and wife of Thomson, 
were guests at the Clarendon hotel. 

James Rooney of the Northwestern 
Fuel compatiy is being boomed for 
alderman in the Siith ward by the labor 
element. He is in every way qualified. 

A sleigh load of young people from 
the West End came verj' near being ar- 
restee! last night in West Superior, but 
were finally let go on promise to keep 
quiet. 

FROM WEST DOLUTH. 



THESE KNOW SECRETS. 



News of 
the 



Some of the Past Workings of 

the West Duluth Land 

Company. 



the Past Week 
Duluth Secret 
Societies. 



in 



Masons, Odd Fellows 
Pythians are Chiefly 
Mentioned. 



and 



KILGORE & SIEWERT 

Will soon make a lively stir in 

- Hats - and - Hen's 



FarDisbings. 



Still at Work for Industries; 

Minor Personal 

Mention. 



Boartl of Trade Caactu. 
A caucus was held by the members of 
the Board of Trade today, to select a 
ticket for Tuesday's annual election. 
President Thomson declined a re-elec- 
tion to the position he has held for the 
past year, and John McLeotl was selected 
for the head of the bi>ard for this year. 
The entire ticket nominated, which will 
be elected without opposition, is as fol- 
lows: 

President John McLeod, of A. J. Saw- 
yer A Co. 

Viie-Hresident, F. S. Daggett, of Van 
Dusen Eiiot Co. 

Directors— A. D. Thomson, A. K. 
Shepard. Ward Ames. 

Arbitration committee— one year — M. 
J. Forbes, O. C. Harlmau, J. H. Smith. 

Committee of appeals — F. A. Gooding. 
C. H. Graves W. S. Birch, Geo. Kupley, 
Geo. Spencer. G. G. Barnum, A. Bailey, 
T. A. Olmsted. 



The n^eek's .HovemenU 

Estimating today's receipts of wheat 
at 2200 bu, the receipts for the week are 
24,200 bu, and shipments, estimating 
to-day's at l.aX), are 11,800, which indi- 
cates an increase of stocks for the week 
of about 13,30c) bu. Corn receipts have 
been 2S,!>44 bu, and shipment*, 26,846 bu 
Bhowing an increase of 2,148 bu for the 
week. Receipts of oats for the week, 
estimating today's at 10,000 bu, have 
been 48,000 bu with no shipments. 

Stocks were weak again today in spite 
of a verj- favorable bank statement. In- 
siders dropped another batch of cotton, 
oil, and sugar was sold by the people 
who recently bought around 50. Rail- 
road earnings were all favorable and the 
large increase in the bank reserve should 
remove any fear of money stringency. 
At the same time railroad affairs in the 
West are in a very unsatisfactory con- 
dition. Speculation is at a standstill 
and a dull and dragging market is not 
likely to mvite buyers. 



West Duluth owes her existence and 
her commtrcial prosperitj' to the West 
Duluth Land company. And to the 
impetus given manufacturing by this 
company Duluth today ranks high 
among the industrial cities of the West. 

In February, 1887, the Forge works, 

the first industrial enterprise of the now 
bustling town, was formed. The plant 
was put in, and the concern ran about 
one year, afterwards being sold to the 
Minnesota Car company. 

The next great scheme in which the 
Land company figured was the Duluth 
it Northwestern Smelting works. Mr. 
Fletcher of Boston was at the head of 
the company, but after waiting a year 
nothing came of it. In the meantime 
the West Duluth Land company had 
been grading streets, building bridges, 
etc., spending in all on improvements 
about $75,000. 

John Birkinbine, the Philadelphia 
iron expert, was then employed to come 
to Duluth, and after looking over the 
Vermilion range to give his opinion as to 
Duluth's future as an iron manafactur- 
ing center. On his favorable report in 
February, 1888, the Duluth Iron and 
Steel Company, of Duluth, Boston and 
Philadelphia capital, was organized by 
R. S. Muugor. Work on this plant has 
steadily progressed, and in sixty days 
everything will be ready for blowing in 
the biggest furnace on Lake Superior. 

Col. Tanner and President Anderson 
of the Minnesota Car 



The Ually Movement. 

Cars on track: Wheat, 13. Corn, 5. 
Receipts: Wheat, 16,597 bu; corn. 29»4 
bu; oats, 14.162 bu. Shipments: Wheat, 
581 ou; corn, 26,846 bu. Inspection: 
Nine cars No. 1 Northern, 6 cars oats. 

Minneapolis reported 127 cars on track „ 

agamst 202 yesterday. Receipts there I company has 
were: Wheat, 273,e»JO bu. Shipments: real estate 
Wheat. 24.940 bu; flour, 22,676 bbls. 
Chicago cars: Wheat, 64; corn, 151: 
oats. 86; rye, 21: barley, 38. 



company, were „,.. j , , ^7 -~ . ""■' 

visitors in Duluth in June, 1888, and ne- | n ' ,„ ' '^°'^' ''^f ^^ '^'.*'^?'^ ^^"^® 
gotiations were opened between the " " """ ' "" 

Land company and them for the estab- 
lishment of the plant that now gives 
West Duluth its greatest reputation. 
The car company agreed to erect a plant 
to cost 6^180,000, but instead have ex- 
pended over «500,000. In December. 
1888, the deal with the West Duluth 
Manufacturing company was closed, 
and that plant ie now in active opera- 
tion. By taking ^90.000 in stock the 
Land company secured the removal of 
the Iron Bay company from Marquette 
to West Duluth. In a short time this 
plant will be employing several hundred 
men. 

The company is now negotiating for 
the establishment of Capt. McDougall's 
great shipbuilding plant, and with this 
will come many other industries. The 
company has been ver\- liberal with 
manufai-tories coming to West Duluth. 
r or loOOO it sold a site to the West Du- 
luth Manufacturing company that now 
18 worth .S45.000. The Iron Car com- 
pany was given LOO acres, the Steel com- 
pany de<»ded a site and the Iron Bay 
company given land and $<X),000 taken 



A public installation of newly-elected 
officers of Encampment No. 36, I. O. O. 
F., was held last Monday evening. A 
large number of ladies were present. D. 
E. Estes of Lake City was the installing 
officer. The following were installed: 
T. W. Hugo, chief patriarch; E. L. 
Winje, senior warden; H. McLeod, high 
priest; R. E. Patterson, junior warden; 
C. Schiller, treasurer; James Sampson, 

recording scribe; William Stephen, finan- 
cial scribe. 

Over filty of the Uniform Rank, 
Knights of Pythias, of Duluth attended 
I memorial service in honor of Justus H. 
Pattibone, the founder of the order, at 
Superior Thursday evening. The memo- 
rial oration was delivered bv Kev. Dr. 
Wright, formerly of Chippewa Falls. 
He paid Duluth Pythians a ileserved 
tribute when he made the statement 
that Duluth was the stronghold of the 
order. At the conclusion of the services 
Mrs. Wright was presented by Allouez 
division witli a line portrait of her hus- 
band. 

Work on the interior of the new 
Masonic kail is progressing rapidly, and 
it now looks as though the society could 
occupy its new quarters before the con- 
tract time. 

A clads of eight was put through the 
Lodge of Perfection, Scottish Rite, Free 
Masonry, this week. 

Palestine lodge. No. 79, A. F. and A. 
M.; has gotten out its new by-laws, the 
pamphlet also containing much interest- 
ing information relative to the lodge. 
The authority of the lodge was granted 
on the 12th of January, 1870. The first 
oflieers were: Joshua B. Culver, \V M ■ 
Jas. D. Ray, S. W.; Franklin W. Ely,' 
J. W.; A. M. Weller, treasurer; Louis 
Berkleman. secretary. Those at present 
are: W. Baird Patton, W. M.; Roger 
S. Powell, S. W.; Thurlow W. Abell. J. 
W.; N. A. Gearhart, treasurer; John ll. 
Logie. secretary. Since the lodge was first 
instituted 269 members have been ad- 
mitted, only twelve of whom have died. 
Only one member has been expelled 
Among the charter members, only three 
of whom have died, can be fftund: J B 
Culver, J. D. Ray, F. W. Ely, J. F. Mc- 
Laren, A. N. Seip, W. Van Brunt, G G 
Farnum, Clinton Markell, A. J. Sawyer, 
J. R. Carey, L. F. McLaren, Freeman 
Keene, Alex. Schultz, S. G. Rogers, Hen- 
ry Freeman. 

The installation of officers of Zenith 
City Odtl Fellows lodge did not take 
plac»e last Monday as arranged on 
account of several of the oflieers elect 
being laid up with the grip. The in- 
stallation will be held Monday with un- 
usual attendant ceremonies, a banqi.^t 
being one of the attractions. 



AWAIT DEVELOPMENTS. 
Remember the place, St. Louis Hotel Block. 



DISTRICT COURT. 



General Proceed ingit In the Civil 
Sliuiuons' Murder Trial. 



CiweH; 



Judge Stearns today set cases 150, 156, 
lo7, 158 for Saturday. At the close of 
court yesterday, the jury in Shellen- 
berger vs. The Duluth Terminal Rail- 
way returned a verdict for the plaintiff 
awarding ^Um. A stay of thirty days 
was granted. This morning the case of 
H. E. Long et al vs. same defendants 
was given to the jury, who returned a 
verdict of 81500 for the plaintifis, and 
the defendants obtained the usual tnirty 
day's stay. Another case with the same 
parties interested was then taken up, 
and was followed by another brought 
against the same defendants by F. D. 
West. 

Judge Stearns will resume the crimi- 
nal calendar on Monday on which day 
John Simmons will receive his second 
trial for the murder of Cook at Tower 
last summer. The court has appointed 
R. P. Edson to conduct the defense. 
Both sides will fight hard and a number 
of new witnesses will be summoned. 
The indictment is for murder in the 
first degree. The Gorseline-Sims as- 
sault case will also come up for trial. In 
Judge Ensign's room yesterday, just be- 
fore adjournment cases were disposed of 
as follows: Hanchett et. a), vs. Hartley 
et. al., to be tried Feb. 4. Wise vs 
Wise, to be tried Feb. .3. Wells, Stone 
Alercantile company vs. Holland «fc 
Thompson et. al., consolidated with No. 
137. D. A. Petre vs. R S. Munger et. al., 
set for trial Jan. 25. Long vs. Miller 
dismissed on motion of plaintiffs. 

In the ciise of A. W. Eiler vs. Andrew 
Berg judgment was ordered for the 
plaintiff this morning for $70..X), with 
interest at 7 per cent from Aug. 18.1888. 
A hearing was had in the cose of the 
Doty Manufacturing company vs. M. W. 
Glenn, tm a motion by the plaintiff's at- 
torneys to strike out the defendant's 
answer as frivolous. The case was con- 
tinued one week to enable defendant to 
present affidavits as to the truth of his 
answer. 

The case of Erickson & Laisen vs. 
Ludington, in the drug store puzzle, 
came u{), but was not heard liecause the 
plaintiffs' attorney had not been servetl 
with a notice, and the judge granted an 
order extending the time. 

THE CITVo HEALTH 



PERSONAL. 




J. West of Pittsburg, Pa., is in 
Milwaukee busi- 



WILL TAKE THOSE BONDS. 



in stock. In all 250 acres have been 
given to manufactories. A belt line has 
been built connecting with the railways. 
Ihe company has also donated lota for 
^^■e churches, and erected a fine bank 
building. Since its incorporation the 
sold about «l,000,OOOof 



Elected a .Ueuiber. 

Gautier de Ste Croix was today elected 
a member of the B<^)aril of Trade. 

The Kunk .Statement. 

New York, Jan. 18.— The weekly bank 
statement shows the following changes: 

Heserve. increase M.:6o.426 

Loans, increase 3.2H.W0 

opece. iu.'rea«e , 1 TCMlaiO 

if- 'Tease .".■.■.■ i,'43b.900 

r,V 5,5(e,7U0 

The banks now hold «37,78ia25 in ex- 
cess of the 25 per cent rule. 



New York Mock<t. 

-,.'r^® 'allowing are closing prices on the 

w «? "iT^ ^**^"^ exchange as reported by 
W. vi . Bill iSc Co.: 



Today. 
Chica^, Burllneton 4 Quinc; lot}*, 

American Cotton Oil Ky 

Missouri Paci Bo " 7>5 

Northern PaciUc preferred Tji? 

ChlcaKo, Milwaulte* & St. Paul. 6^^ 

BUKar Trust BaiJ 

Ga« Trust ^ 

Louisville 4 NashvlUe. ...:...::; 86X 
thica*foJc Northwestern. 109« 

Kock IsUml ' 86X 



V'eeter- 
day. 

lue^ 

29>,i 

■ri% 

66S 
46 

>»% 
110 
96 

IW, 
36S 
85'/, 
20?. 
31 

a^ 

Hh 

106?i 

The MlnneapoUs Close. 

Kif^^hT?."*'/""- 1^ -Closing uuoUtlonB- 
5»V V^B*"^'^' •'»n"?'7. ■^: February. 79; 
f^^y- P^ "2^:'^ ^- No. J northern 
.<anuar}, ,i; Feb. T**: Mav mi, • nX 

»W?iS' "'<^~ii No. 2 northern JknuaJy 73? 
February Ti; May. 77^: on track. 7Sa76. 



Lake Shore 

Reading' ' [[" 

Tenn. coal and iroii....!] 
Richmond Terminal.. 

Atchison 

Xtelaware* Lackawanna! 

New Enjfland 

LeadTnjst 

we.r. on..:...:::::: 

Cti; 

ot.::::::.:'"^'*^'' ■■■■■■ 



... 3BX 

• Sf* 
... 21 

... au% 

...135X 
... *i\ 

.. aoj4 

... 84 

... asH 

.. 33X 
...106 



Notes. 

The heavy Eastern men of the Car 
company will be in Duluth in a few days 
excepting Gen. Anderson. They are now 
on the way out. 

A car load of household goods arrived 
yesterday from Reed City, Mich., for C. 
M. Ihonias. 

Stowell is the name of the old Grassy 
Point station, named in honor of Col 
Stowell. 

A. Oslxjm of Marquette received a car 
of furniture from Marquette. 

ou .'^•"°'^*'y *^®'"® '^i^^ t)e a change in 
Jshort line time as follows: The train 
leaving Duluth at 4:15 p. m., will leave 
* ;-- P",?' ^^^ arrive at West Duluth 
at4:Di. Returning it will leave West 
tsuperior at G p. m. instead of 5:05; will 
leave West Duluth at 6:17 p. m., nearly 
an hour later than formally. 

A force of men is at work clearing off 
the Second division of Bay View 
Heights. 

The name of the West Duluth Ter- i 
minal and Duluth Incline railways is to I 
be changed to the Duluth Belt Line 
railway. 



Hayes & Son Find au.;j Want the Uuluth 
Bonds After Ail. 
After all the palaver, fuss and feathers 
raised by Hayee & Son of Cleveland 
aoout the $100,000 worth of Duluth 
bonds, they have made up their minds 
that their judgment io the premises, 
when they first bid for the bonds, was 
all right. City Clerk Budden received a 
telegram from Hayes A: Son this morn- 
ing, informing him that the investiga- 
tions they had been pursuing laiely rela- 
tive to the city's financial condition had 
turned out favorably, and that the bonds 
will be taken up at once. 

This, after the publication by 
the morning papers of volumin- 
ous correspondence passing be- 
tween Hayes &, Son and the 
city and tending to cast a cloud on Du- 
luth's credit is a little unexpected to 
many. The Herald refrained from pub- 
lishing this correspondence, believing 
that nothing could be gained bv notori- 
ety. The culmination of the matter has 
proved that this conclusion was a sensi- 
ble one. Hayes &. S<jn have undoubtedly 
conducted themselves in an irrational 
and unaccountable manner, all through, 
which would indicate they acted without 
due judgment. Their conclusion to take 
up the bonds is certainly a wise one. 



iHlnGoodCoudUlo.. .,.,..: The Initpeetor's 
Monthly Kepurt. 

Chief Health Inspector Rossiter has 
issued his monthly sanitary report, of 
which the following is a condensation- 
Number of visits made by health in- 
sjjoctors, ;K>70; notices served to clean, 
157; nuisances abated. 99; dead animals 
reported, G; arrests made for violating 
health ordinances, 2; complaints re- 
ceived, .37; complaints attended to, 34; 
alleys examined, 28; water-tight vaults 
ordered in, 11; cellars examined, 14. 

The sanitary condition of the city is 
excellent at the present time. Only one 
case of scarlet fever, and that at the ex- 
treme West End; little or no typhoid or 
other epidemics, excepting the grip, and 
that is abating rai)idly. 

PARK POINT PICKINGS. 

Fred Smith is very low with pneu- 
monia, developed from the grip, and his 
recover.- is doubtful. 

Mrs. Lawrence is suffering from a bad 
attack i>f influenza. 

Capt. Osb<^)rn has received a patent on 
his improved sand scow. 

Mrs. Freeman Smith has recovered 
from her recent illness, and Engineer 
James Mutch is better. 

There will Ije no services in Park Point 
church tomorrow. 

A large proj)ortion of the French resi- 
dents are sick with various complainte, 
principally colds. 

Freil Klein, who left here last fall and 
moved to Pueblo, Colorado, on acct)untof 
asthma, has l>een heard from in his new 
home. His health is improved. 



Mr. J. 

the city. 

C. B. Birkenwald, a 
ness man, is in tt>wn. 

C. W. Osborne and W. A. Meiken, New 
York and J. W. Keyee of Ashland are at 
The Spalding. 

Mr. John P. Paulson and wife of 
Northern Pacific Junction, are guests at 
the Merchants. 

Mrs. J. H. Hayes, an Ashland lady, is 
a guest at the Merchants. 

Among the arrivals at The Spalding 
this morning wore Mr. and Mrs. W. S 
St<jne of New York. 

Mr. Sidney A. Parsons, assistant city 
engineer, has returned from an extended 
trip in the East. 

The county commissioners met this 
moriiing at the court house to select the 
panel of names from which the grand 
and petit juries for the next term of 
court will be drawn. The lists were not 
completed at noon, at which time the 
county fathers adjourned to next Mon- 
day afternoon at 2 o'clock. At that 
meeting the bonds of the various county 
othcials will be presented for approval. 

There was another break in the mains 
at the East End of the city which was 
soon repaired, the water supply only 
being shut off for a short time. ' 

wJ'^C F'lj'-r'^ Walker, manager of 
Walkers Military band, returned this 
morning from a trip to Pennsylvania 

San ford W. Hill of the West End is 
very low with pneumonia. 

Mr. J. C. Murnane returned this morn- 
ing from an extended trip to Chicago. 
St. Louis and Kansas City. Ho is chock 
full of bawtball and sporting news. 

County Auditor LaVaque returned 
from a business conference with the 
auditors of Hennepin and Ramsey coun- 
ties. 

Mrs. Savage of the Childrens Aid so- 
ciety, vyent to St. Paul today with an- 
other little waif for that noble institu- 
tion. 

City .-V-ssessor Cooley returned from a 
business trip to St. Paul this morning 

Mr. P. A. Burdick, the noted temper- 
ance lecturer, arrived todav from New 
1 ork. 

Mrs. S. Selleck left yesterday for the 
fecuth to spend the winter with her 
daughter, Mrs. I. S. Foster, at Tallapoo- 
sa, (reorgia. 

D. Buchanan, the grocer, went to St. 
Paul last evening on business. 

Lon Merritt has been quite ill for aev- 
eral days. 

Dr. Fannie Holden has been confined 
to the house with a severe indisposition. 

Reffister Kes luie. 

At The Spalding: N. Reiss, George 
Bigelow, A. L. Dowler, H. Tripp. Chi- 
oago; J. D. M. Lobdell, W. P. Keily, A. 

n VK '^fl^' t!^-,V'- ^^'"«ht' >^ew York; G. 
C. \Veil, A. Dillebach, Philadelphia; W. 

^^m",',r**-^^**^'®''' ^Minneapolis; F. Gro- 
ver, T. W. Raneon, J. H. Schuge, E. D 



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CC 

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Will continue Fif :een Days-until stock is re- 

MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 

Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unquahhed success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides 
you M ould not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

wo^rlh^a^t leTt $1 6 '^""* ^-^''--ed Overcoat. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear 
i^urnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
Tl ^""""t^^.^f^^^ ^^5,ooo (thirty.five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to lake the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 

M. S. BURROWS & CO. 




» 'I 



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PWR FUa CO., 




WKATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. 17. —Forecoaf /or Duluth and 
vvcinitv for 24 hours commencinQ 10 a.m. 
today: Colder weather ; snow. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



COAL 



CROSS CfifEK LEHIGH. 

FREE BURNING, 

IINIHfiJiCITE i BIIUMIHOUS, 




Wry Maple, 

Hard Mixed, 

.Slab!), 



CONNELLSVILLE 
hi GAS HOUSE 




PORTRAITS! 



A LIFE-SIZE PORTRillT GIVEN AIY WITH m PURCHASE 

OF $15 OR OVER 

This, m comection with our vv.nuow win prove. 

Red F-igure Mark -Down Sale 



Doctor, Milwaukee; J. 
Julian Small, Freder- 



CHUHCH dERVICtU. 



DISCHAKGt DULUTH MEN 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. MACFAKL.\jf£ & Austin. 



Chicago Close. 

Chjcago, Jan. IS — 1:15 p m 
umer: January, 76',; Mar, 80^ 
Januao-. A?i; May, 31}i 



WE ST EN D. 

That Bateher Shop !ienp Kxplained ; Other 
tieneral News N'otei*. 

The young Norwegian who claimed 
that he was sandbagged by a Superior 
Btrqet butcher last Wednesday seems to 
have been somewhat mistaken. The 
man who hit him was an employe It 
seems that the Xorwejrian came into the 
shop for the purpose of making trouble 
and he insulted an employe in the pres- 
ence of ladies, and while he was going 
out called back very tough namee. llie 
employe gave chase, caught him and 
knocked him down. The butcher him- 
self knew nothing of the trouble until he 
returned from up town. 

The wheelbarrow race between five 
young men at Twentieth avenue rink 
last nij^tit was very exciting. The first 
money was given to Bohnheeser, while 
second money went to Alfred Broman. 

Contractor David Lang went to St. 

Paul yesterday on a short business trip! 

Chaa. Cliapley, a former resident of 

the West End will leave srxjn to study 

pharmacy in .\nn Arbor. 

N. A. Clausen, the Superior street 
jeweler, will leave next week for Wash- 
ington for his health. 

Rev. J. Johnson, presiding elder for 
the state of the Norwegian ^Methodists, 
is visiting with the resident pastor. He' 
will remain until Monday. Tomorrow 



CITY BRIEFS. 

Kilgore & Siewert, the St. Louis hotel 
gentlemen 8 furnishing firm, have pur- 
chased Morison's furnishing house on 
t.ast Superior street. 

The Lillian Lewis company continued 
Its lower engagement to two nights. 

«t filf k"?*"!: °°® Pl*^^i°« °ot guilty 
at first, but afterward changing his plea 

to guilty comprised the criminal busi- 
ness at the pcjlice court this morning 

The child Ix.rn to Mr. and Mrs. John 
Fanton several days ago died this morn- 
ing. Ilie store of Pauton i WateoB has 
oeen closed today in consequence. 

ol«9e— Whea t '*"'' ''traliihteii a Street. 

Com. firm; The city engineer has taken a tran- 
script of the original plat of Piedmont 
avenue west, for the purpose of straight- 
ening the road to the full width. From 
the appearance of the copy it would 
appear that considerable drafting had te 
be done. The roadway is supposed to 
be sixty feet across, but it isn't that 
width except in spots. At some points 
It widens out from eighty to 100 feet 
As soon as the plat is ready a commission 
will be apiK)inted for the purpose of 
viewing the highway to assess damages 
and benefits. Some of the adjoining lots 
will receive large slices of the roadway 
while otherswillbe correspondingly cut 

Victimized Duluthlans. 
■\ man whose real name may be Chas. 
n. Smith, but who possesses half a dozen 
aliases was arrested last night at the in- 
stance of H. B. Moore an<l others for 
nefarious practices. Smith, it is under 
stood, victimized several Duluthians 
representing that he was in reduced cir- 
cumstances and a member of the G A 
K. He claimed to be James F. Reynoldn' 
captain of the Fifteenth United States 
infantry. He made headquarters at 
Uapt. Savage s saloon, where an over- 
hauling of his baggage revealed his 
name and rank. He will have a hearintf 
Monday. ** 



And Import Labor to Uuild I>iUuth Build- 
ings; Contractors Who'd Not be .Ui!t.sed. 
The contractors who are doing the in- 
terior work m the Palladio and Chamber 
of Commerce buildings have discharged 
all the Duluth laborers and artisans em- 
ployed in the work, and have imported a 
number of Minneapolis men to fill their 
I places. As a consequence there is a 
large number of carpenters and laborers 
walking the streets this morning out of 
employment. 

The Brotherhood of Carpenters and 
Joiners have taken the matter in hand 
have prepared a petition to be presented 
to the Chamber of Commerce, to see 
whether or not there can be auv change 
in this state of affairs. A committee will 
wait upon the Chamber Tuesday with 
this purpose in view. There is an im- 
pression among laboring men that the 
Chamber of Commerce building is owned 
and under the control of the Chamber 
of Commerce body. This is a mistake. 
Ihe buildmg receives its name out of 
courtesy to the body, which will rent 
rooms there. The Chamber has nothing 
whatever to do with the building. Some 
of Its individual members subscribed a 
tithe of the stock, some $10,000. 

SALE OF MI NING PROPERTY. 

A Half Interest in Two Optlon» Sold to 
Capt. Hugh Steele. 

R. J. Hayes of Ashland has sold a half 
interest in valuable iron land options to 
Hugh Steele, the Duluth 
who put in the government breakwater 
«.»?-«■ ml consideration named is 
».JUjO. They already have a shaft down 
seventy feet on the options and they ere 
now in mixed hematite with good indi- 
°?Vu° m ,Tho properties are located east 
of the Tylers Forks and work will be 
continued until spring. 



Rev. Mr. ^ovcs will preach at the Plljrrlin 
J/ongro^tloual church iu tlie morning Sub- 
bath school at ainm as usual. No preachinir 
service In the evening:. The congregation 
unites in the union service In the Oocra 
liousc. *^ 

First Presbyterian church. Rev. A. W. Ring- 
I'^fhVo.V" S^u P?f'"''r*?"''°'"«f service. lu:30. 
at I_, y p. 8. c. E. at tj:.iO p. m. At 7:*) the 
congregation will unite with the other congre- 
gatloiis of the city In a temperance meeting at 
Temple Opera. " 

Endion Baptist churcli. Second street near 
leiith avenue east— Services on Sunday as 
usual both morning and evening conducted 
,0''^'"' fi^^'P'■^<^«*• •"• Hilton. Sunday school 
1- M. W. U. Patton, superintendent. 

Services will be hold at the Chrlstl.'iu Scieuc*- 
Uisiwnsary tomorrow at l(i:30 a in. and 7;Jo 
p. m.. Mrs. M. C. Swift speaker. Sunday school 
at noon. 

St. Pauls Episcopal church, corner Lake ave- 
nue and feecond street. Rev. William M. Ilarkor 
rector. Holy communion, s a. m.; Sunday 
siiiool. 10 a. m.; morning service and sermon 
11 a. ni ; evening service and sermon. 7.au p. m 
.."e'uel-C C. Salter, pastor-U-nd-ii-Hand. 
10:3(1 a. mSundaj schcK)!. .3 p. m. Evening 
service a«Ijourned to tli.- Temple Opera OoC 
pel meeting WiMlnesday 7:30 p. m. 

The Hotbcl will not l>e open Sundoy night on 
account of the temperance rally at the opera. 
At the tnorning otrvlw. 10::((» o'clock, at the 
Jlrst MetluKlist fcpi.-^copal church. Rev. K S 
Pilling, pastor ot Grace M. E. church will 
preach. 

..i^'^i* ^i- ^ I^thrpp of West Duluth. will 
proaeli in Grace Methodist church Ih Uie 
morning at 10 :3U. 

u".*!?-!, ;£"r^'*' 9\^' ^'" preach at the 
Met b<K)i8t Episcopal church. In the evening 
no services at the First Methodist Episcopal 
church on account of the union meeting In 
Temple 0|>era. «-^"ui! lu 

— y 

Lots 146 and 148, block 4.% Third divi- 
sion, a choice corner of 100x150 feet, for 
sale by E. W. Markell, ground floor Hotel 
St. Louis block. 



Middaugh; J. \\ . 
Cohen, Alfjena; 
icksburg, Va. 

-Vt the St. Louis: B. T. Pinkney, T. 
A. Clark, J. E. Sault, St. Paul; OP 
Rice, Milwraukee; Will A. Webster, Chi- 
cago; M. Quinn, Saginaw; C.A. Baker, 
N ew 1 ork. 

At the Men-hants: M. J. Devit, John 

D. Brody, St Paul; W^ H. Jame^, Sell- 
wood; D.G.Shencke, Reedsburg, Wis.; 

E. Connell, Elroy; E. E. Smalley, Kan- 
^ City; J. C. Tyre, Minn eapolis 

A l.arge .Milk *irm. 

A consolidation of the milk and pro- 
duce hrius of Briilgeman & Sinotte and 
Feers & Co. has been effected, under the 
name of the Duluth Milk A Produce 
company. This is a g.Kxl move, and 
these gentlemen are experienced in their 
business. The combination is a strong 
one. The place of business is at 529 
West Superior street. Peers & Co. have 
been getting in 500 gallons of milk daily 
heretofore and Bridgeman & Sinotte 
have retailed largely 



mm peoMPTLy D[Liy[B[o 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK.i 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 




WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



Mortgage Sale. 




Absolutely Pure. 



itl^fS^^l^" I'^^er janes. A marvel of pur- 
nV^',.^ "i°**.^ ^""^ wholesomcnoBs. More eco- 
nomical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold In competition with the multi- 
tude of low test, short weight, alum or phos- 

i.vKiNo PowDUR C.I.. in« Wall street. N. Y 



Default having been made In the payment 
ofthesutnof three hundied and sixty 50-100 
dollars. (WtiO W-100) principal and Interest which 
Is claimed to be due at the date of this notice 
upon acertain mortgage duly executed and 
drUvered by Frank I)oy le, a bachelor, to Jam" s 
B.Howard and Alexander H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth day ot November, A. D \m 
and duly M-corded In tlie office of the register 
ol deeds in and for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on tlie laih dat^ of 

uS^L'""!.^'-.'' i ^- ^*^' "t 9 o'clock a. m.-. In 
uook ^t> of mortgages, on page 3(52; and no 
action or proceeding at law or otherwise hav- 
ing been instituted to recover the debt se- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part thereof: 

Aow, therefore, notic-e is herel)y given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained In said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
ctise made aiid provided, the said mortgage 
Will be foreclosed, and the premises described 
In and covered by said mortgage, viz: Lots 
numlK>re.l six (ti), seven (T) and eight (8i and 
the northeast <juarter (ne!,) of the southeast 
quarter (se!4) of section numbered twenty-two 
0-.), all in township No. sixty-one (Bit north of 
range No. twelve (13) west of tlie fourth (4th) 
principal niendian. in St. Louis county, and 
state of .Mlnuesoui, with the hereditaments and 

?^?h"'M°£'"'.®f-Ti'^'?-"»"'"l*' Pu'^llc auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes (If any) on said prem- 
ises and tweuty-flve dollars, attornev's fees, 
as stlpu ated in and by said mortgage" in ca^ 
of foreclosure, and the disbursement* allowed 

of said St. Louis county, at the front door of 
the court house, in the city of Duluth. in said 
county and state, on the 29th day 
of January. A. D. IKStO, at 10:,3() o'clock a, m. on 
that day, subject to redemption at anv time 
within one year from the day of sale, as pr«H 
vidcd by law. *^ 

Dated December 13th, A. D. 18M). 

Ja^ucs B. Howard. 
and 

H V v.„»,» Ale.\andebH. Davis. 

K. N. BlARBLK. Mortgagees 

,^ Attorney. 

Dec. 14-21-28. Jan. 4-H-18-26. 



Money To Be Mad 



LOOK AT OUR LIST AND PURCHASE SOON, 



Fine btsmess corner, Fourth street, $' 5,000 
Has an income of $ I 800, and rents are low 

rr.^ .^2^'r^.'' ^^'^f^* '°* '" the heart of imp'rove- 
ments, $50 per front foot; below market valuie. 
Make inquiry of this; it is a fine purchase. 
Two Fourth street Business Lots, cheap. 



y\ 



-;- Lots in All Parts of Endion Division -;- 




Notice to Contfactofs. 



ChilUren'M Garmenla 

At auction in the St. Louis old dining- 
room. Sale from 2 to 6 p. m. and 7 to 9 
p. m. 



Warmer than Eliiewhere. 

Duluth was the only one of the Xorth- 
western signal stations this morning 
where the thermometer was above zero 

*'^'w; ^^?^ ^^ *"* * ^^ow, Bismarck 
and Moorheail, which are almost exactly 
in this latitute, rejfistered 18 below. At 
Calgary, the extreme northwestern sta- 
tion, the record is 3G below zero, at Du- 
luth it was 8 alHjve zero, the minimum 
m the past twenty-four hours being 4 
below. The forecast at the signal office 
predicts warmer weather for tomorrow. 

To Talk Over the Contraot .System. 

There will be a political meeting in 
the interests of labor at the Knights of 
Pythias hall. Hunter block, at 8 o'clock 
tonight. The labor people are anxious 
to meet as many business men as care to 
attend, and hear the presentation of 
their theories on the contract and fran- 
j chise systeme. 



Mr. Prentice's Notice. 
In justice to Mr. Frederick Prentice 
contractor T- • j f Pfe««'ng his claim to an un- 
K?°-.!?':r'' M'vided one-half in the Third Division 
here in the proper channel of the courts 
it should be stated that he has at no 
time made any overtures or solicita- 
tions for the settlement of his claim byany 
body, being entirely content to await the 
nnal authoritative decision of the court 
of last appeal. In the face of this part, 
Ibe ilerald's head-line yesterday over a 
simple notice of his presence in the city 
in response to calls upon him, did him 
an unintentional injustice. As a busi- 
ness method of answering applications 
which have been made to him 
we desired to announce simply 
that he will be at The Spalding for 
two or three days, prior to leaving for 
New York, where any party wishing to 
see him on business connected with thej 
property, or desiring to effect a settle- 
ment, can do so. Mr. Prentice says he 
IS lead to make this announcement from 
the fact that such men as Messrs. Men- 
denhall xMiller, Harrington, Peyton, 
Macfarlane, Spencer, Forbes, Upham 
WilliaiuB, and a number of other leading 
citizens have settled, and several others 
are arranging to do so. It was at their 
suggestion that Mr. I»rentioe returned 
here again before going East. The case 
which IS to decide the matter will come 
up in the United States court at St. Paul 
Boon, 



Sealed proposals will be received until 8 
o clock p m.. January 3Uth, im\ by K. K Jef- 
Jn^f"^ *'*'?''''?".',» «»'tommittoe on court house 
and county jail, for the cell work in the new 
county jail, in accordan.e with plan". sw^TJ 
cations .Iraw n liy O. G. Traphagen architect 
"°m IV "'^'.?'«^e of the coLmrau.iftor ' 

Bidders will si^cify what quality and 
..n,i .1 .; ''"^'nt' stPel they propose to use. 
L,^'.f".'".""T'"'''«^' "''''*'"<?• They will al^ 



.fn^ '^ "J. '■''"*'"'^ » pel they propose to use. 
and submit .sample of same, they will al^ 
siibmil drawings or saranlcB of locks and bars 
1(1 " - 



mechanical 



de- 



tliey propose U> use, and all 
vlet's connecte<l with the cells. 

Each proposal must lie accompanied with a 
check for five hundred dollars U) Ih- forfeited 
to !>f Louis c-ounty. In the event that the pro- 
posal which said check ac«.mpaniu8 shUlb^ 
fhoi'^J^'' *"*' ""-' "'un'J- commissioners, and 
that the person making the pro|K)sal shaU fail 
to c-omply with its terms 

nnV;?'^T'' ■♦" •"^Pos'i's to E. R. Jefferson. In 
?^«l,"^^'^"°'*■ .""'^'f"'"- l>uluth, Minn. For 
further Information apply to 

John F. BcHLEUNBg. 
Superintendent, Duluth, Minn, 
the commissioners reserve the right to re- 
ject any and all uro()08als 
Dec 14-ls.3l-24-2Hjau 1-4-8-11-15-18-23. 



Notice to Contfactofs. 



Sealed prop<J^Bal8 will be received at the of- 
nccof the undersigned until the 26th day of 
^i^V-j.^P' M*'- '?"■ ^^'^ crectU>n and completion 
of 1,)0 dwelling houses, more or less, at West 
Duluth. Minn., for the Mlnnesoto Iron Car 
company, according to rilans and speciflcntlons 
^^i.^""^ ^*' '^'^ u'KJcrsigned and now on file 
at his othce. Each contractor ofctimatlng on 
this work will be required to submit with his 
proposal a properly executed bond of two 
responsible sureties in the sum of 8500 as a 

f-"l^'^I'"'*;i'^'^' '" '^*'^* thR contract is awarded, 
he will within a reasonable time eseoutc aeon- 
tract and bond satisfactory to the owners, 
oralfblds*^'"*'***''^*^''''" '^'"•^ '■•^Ject any 
O. O. Traphaokn. 

^.Hd.n"' ^.^'•.^'.l'''i?."=' *^'^* Natto'S^"^nk 
building. Duluth, Minn. 



$1 50 Will carry lot in block 93; look this up. 

*• ^?J^^^^ blocks, KImberley & Strykers addi- 
tion, $ I 200 each. ^ 

Double corner, Bay View, 250 cash; away 
below other prices. 




7500 ACRES FOR SALE 



CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

^ ""-CROSS DIAMOND BRANO 

Har*Ku.| alwa/H r.li»bl«. LsJIm, 
Mk IlrujKiBt for lH<xmon4 Brand ia 
rc4, mitillio boi.s. a. >|ni wm, blue 
/ribbon. Take m other. ;lll pilli' 
|ln pMKboKr.! (KiiM, pink wnpotn. an 
aanBrroaa couatcrfrlu. Send 4«, 

'■Keller fur Ladle*," in ItUm; bj 

^all. \atnr /^ijier 
CkkkKtrr (l«u'l <«., 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Me Snperior Brewery 

Is the largest In the Sute of Mln neaota ou aide 
of the Twli Cltlet, 



In lots of from 10 to 600 
rated to suit purchasers. 



acres; may be sepa- 





DAVID M. FORD, 

Houghton, L. S.. Mich. 




DEAtiER IN 



^RICH'D F. MARVIN, 

REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



-AND— 



Lake Superior Gold, Iron and Copper Ms 

Michigan Gold Company's Stock a Specialty. 

"The richest mines In the world." 

CORRKSPONDENCE SOLICITED. 



- 4 - WHIPPLE'S - 

Can be boug;ht. Contains over 700 lots. Easv 
U2Tf N W ?T50?ir''^ ^ handsome prof.t-N 



Want to Loan $200, $300, $5000 

and $15,000. 



INSURANCE 



Booms I , 

DULUTH, 



2, Exchange BIdg. 

MINN. 




WHITE BEAVER'S 

HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

r. H. SPEKCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



FIRE INSURANCE CAREFULLY WRITTEN. 



MYERS & WHIPPLE, 

First National Bank Building. 




' "" I-. ' f T"^, 





- m m-^- » -' i ■ -■r a r 



I 




ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 y^—t Superior Street. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



FOK BARGAINS 



E.DC. HOLD DAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDING. 



VOL.. 7; NO. 247. 



L-A-S-T 



V 



TEN DAYS 



iOF THE- 



GREAT HOLIDAY 



• 





J^T 



' 1 





S 



JEWELER, 



115 West Supefioi Sket, 




\ 




IS 



it 



■TO GET- 



\ 



\ 



RELIABLE GOODS 



-AT- 



DULUTH, MINN.. MONDAY, JANUAKV 20, 1890. 



PBIC£ THBSE CflNTS. 



LAST EmilON, 



UOWMIlNYIiREWEIlOW? 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guesses 
Duluth. 



m 



m ! 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Nov»^ to 

May. 



Subject on Which all Have 
Opinions to Give 
Us. 



The census of the United State i will 
be taken this year under the direction of 
the government. Every city and town- 
ship will be enumerated separately. 

There has always been great interest 
attached to the figures of population of 
Duluth. This will be esi)eciaUy the 
case this year, as the last government 
census gave us a total of 37 iO jieople, 
and it is almost certain that no city in 
the United States has ever shown such 
a j)ercentage of growth as will Duluth. 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" is meant 
the city proj)er. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and. 
purposes parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will offer a 
prize to the person guessing the num 
ber or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to Bueh successful guesser two 
cash prizes, 

First Prize $50 In Gold, Second Prize $a5 
in Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



Popnlatlon Conteut Coupon. 

Mv ^ues? us to the uuiiiber of iiiliuliltaiits ; 
In Duluth. West Duluth, Lakeside and ; 
Lester Park to bo shown by returns of the ; 
census enumerators in the summer of 1«W ■ 
is as follows: 
Whole number of Inhabltantit— 



SENSATIONA L DEV ELOPMENTS. 

The Authorities Kxpect to Lay Hands on 
Cronin Conspirators. 

Chicaoo, Jan. :I0.— A large crowd was 
attracted to Judge Horton's room in the 
criminal court building this morning by 
the fact that the case of the men charged 
with attempts to bribe the special 
veniresmen during the progress of the 
Cronin case, was on the docket for im- 
mediate trial. 

This case is expected, in point of sen- 
sational developments, omly second to 
that of the celebrated trial itself, as a 
vigorous effort will be made by the state 
to get at the identity of the people of 
means behind Martin Burke and his as- 
sociates who were willing to put up tenb 
of thousands of dollars to secure an 
acquittal or a disagreement of the jury. 
Of the seven men indicted only Graham, 
Kavanagh and O'Donnell have been 
placed on trial, and the others, including 
the two bailiffs, Hanks and Saloman, 
Fred Smith and Joseph Konen, the fruit 
dealer, will be used as witnesses. 

The state's case is based upon the 
theory that Graham is the chief offender, 
and there are some shrewd guesses re- 
garding his employer. There were two 
branches, one headed by Graham 
assisted by Solomon and Hanks, and U^» 
other branch being intrusted to Tom 
Kavanagh and O'Donnell. 

The men are indicted for conspiracy 
to commit an unlawful act, and before 
the trial is over the authorities hope to 
lay their hands upon the real leatler of 
the conspiracy -the man that conceived 
the plot and furnished the money and 
tools for its execution. At the outset of 
the proceedings this morning it was 
state<^l that Graham was sick with the 
grip and a continuance was asked. De- 
cision was postponed pending the pro- 
duction of medical certificate. 



mmm new m. 



How He 
and in 



Celebrates in Duluth 
the Rest of the 
World. 



The Method in the Old Count'-y 
and in 'Frisco 
Well. 



as 



Crackers and Banquets of 
Day; a Very Spread 
Menu. 



the 



CITY BRIEFS. 



The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
6 above; 3 p. m., 10' above; Gp. m., 10^ 
above; 10 p. m., 6' above; 7 a. m., 0° 
9 a. m., 1 below; 12 ta., 3 below; 
Maximum, 10" above. Minimum, 3° be- 
low. Daily range, 13 . 

P. A. Burdick will occupy the whole 
week at the Methodist church, lecturing 
on temperance. 

The juvenile cooking school will open 
tomorrow morning at the Bethel, under 
the management of Miss French, as be- 
fore. A large class is organized. 

The regular meeting of Willis A. Gor- 
man post occurs tomorrow evening. 
There will probably be some new mem 
bers initiated. 

The second-class rate over all Duluth 
roads to Chicago is now 89, a cut of 81 
under the old second-class rate. The 
first-class fare. 813, remains the same. 

Mrs. Nettie M. Goodsell has been ap- 
p<3intei.l to a clerkship in the clerk of the 
court's office. 

PERSONAL. 



TREMENDOUS BLOCKADES. 



On 1 he Northern and Central 

Pacific are Great Snow 

Banks. 



Washington and Oregon Shut 

(Dff From the Outside 

World. 



GOING T O AUS TRALIA. 

Henry Geitrge to Take a Trip In the Inter- 
est!' of Free Trade. 

New York, Jan. 20.— Henry George 
leaves here tonight en route for Austra- 
lia with the mission of strengthening 
the free trade party in New South 
Wales. He will stop at Chicago, St. 
Ijouis, Ijos Angeles and San Francisco. 
At Wellington, New Zelaud, he will be 
the guest of Lieut, (iovernor Sir George 
Gray, who hiis come out as an ardent 
advocate of the single tax theory. At 
the last election the free trade and lib- 
eral party of the colony led by Sir Henry 
Parkes, obtained a majority of only one 
in the lower house of parliament. Should 
this majority be lost at the next general 
election the national protective party 
would come into power. The single tax 
men with the liberals and free traders 
have therefore resolved upon an educa- 
tional campaign and have agreed to pay 
Mr. George a handsome figure for his 
services. 

SIGNS OF WEAKNESS. 



Duluth Chinamen are celebrating 
their New Year's day totlay in a quiet, 
unostentatious way. This is the Sun 
Nan or New Year of the Mongolian, and 
between Chinamen in this city today 
the greeting, "Sum HoA"— Happy New 
Year— is h«»ard. All their faces wear a 
liappy, contented smile. The laundries 
have been closed and the men are enjoy- 
ing the holiday. 

Gifts have been secured and given, for 
New Year's is the gift day in the old 
country. The more prosperous China- 
men here have given dinners to their less 
fortunate companions, and the slanting 
of each i)igtail wears a look of content- 
ment that only a full stomach can give. 

In China the day is observed with 
universal enjoyment. Crackers are fired, 
kites floated, pr<Kt>ssions pass through 
the streets, bands of music i)lay, and 
everyone has a jolly time. The only 
thing that aitproaches it in this country 
takes place in San Francis<-o. 

All the Chinamen in Duluth have ex- 
changed visits today, and with cigarettes 
in mouth htive sat by each other's fire- 
sides and swapped stories of times in the 
"old country." 

Every year in three of the Chinese 
year has thirt*>en months, February 
having thirty days and this is one of 
the lucky ones. The holiday that ap- 
proximates to our Christmas comes on 
the 2l8t of Decemljer. 



: Name of eiiewier- 



Re^idence of puenser— 



Travel to the Pacific Coast 

Practically Stopped 

Now. 



Mankato 

commis- 
morning 



IN 'FRISCO. 



How Our 



Western 
the 



Date, Jan. 90, 181M>. 



Cut out this coupon, make your guess upon 
It and send it to Tlie Daily Herald. All (fuetses 
must be made on this eoupou. Only one Kuets 
allowed to a feintrle eoupou. In Case there shall 
be two or more answers of the sairie number, 
which numlier is nearest or next to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winner shMll lie. in either case, the one whose 
oouiion bears the earliest date. 



oup 
Address all answers to 



The Sei'^eder* From ll»e W. C. T. T. Think 

They dee Signs of Dlsiutegratloii In 

the Parent OrKanl/.atlon. 

Ci-EVKUAM>, Jan. 20. The leading 
spirits of the Womena Non-partisan 
Temperance movement say tliat the 
manifesto issued last week by the parent 
organization, and over the signature of 
Miss Frances Willard, is a confession of 
weakness. 

The manifesto in question says that 
the local organizations must be k:pt up 
in spite of the seceders, so long as a white 
ribboner remains true to such organiza- 
tion, and denies that the W. C. T- U. is 
committed in any way to the 8upr>ort of 
prohibition or the prohibition party. 
The seceders say that this is a sign of 
retreat and point to Miss Willard'e writ- 
ings and speeches and her attitude in 
numerous prohibition conventions as 
showing how bard she worked to make 
the W. C. T. U. an auxtUiary to the na- 
tional prohibition movement. 



"Guess 



nio Dally Herald. 

Duluth, Minn. 



Chinamen Celebrate 
Day. 

San FR.VNCISCO, Jan. 20.— The Chinese 
New Year celebration began last night at 
dusk. At 3 o'clot!k this morning it had 
reached f- at stage of joyous riot when 
the Chinamen begins to have fun. 

Clark street south of Van Buren was 
crowded with happy Chinamen, and 
more happy Chinamen were bobbing in 
front of the pictures of the joss in the 
pleasant resorts where Chicago China- 
men gather to smoke and have good 
times. All the shops were lighted and 
red pajjer signs hung in the windows, 
friendly parties of Chinamen were toss- 
ing off cups of rice gin, while upstairs 
Chinese orchestras were laying them- 
selves out for the pleasure of twenty or 
thirty privileged Chinamen 




May Serve an a Guide. 

In order to give data that Is of interest and 
may be of value. The Herald repriut^s the tol- 
lowini? from the directory report ot 1(^, but 
it must be remembered that this paper does 
not vouch for th"? accuracy of the opinions set 
forth or the tiKures (riven : 

This volume i-outalns :},:«W more names than 
the last isi>«D; a total of l«.:iiti adult citizens of 
JJuluth; this sum nuiltiplicd by 2%, the factor 
which has lieen found to truthfully ropresont 
the women and cliildren not iucludcni in the 
list. lndiciitesav>opulatlou of Kl.'.cW for Du- 
luth, a gain of 10,OU) inhabitants within a year, 
and the prediction is ventured that if a full, 
complete and accurate i-ountl)e ramie by ex- 
IK'ricnce<l and competent canvassers, nearly 
Wi.uuo souls will be found within tlie corpo- 
rate limits of Duluth in IXfM. 

Population by Yean*. 

18B0, United States census 3,4T0 

1886, state census JS-SSS 

1886, directory estimate ffl,000 

1W*7, directory estimate 3tl,iJU0 

1888, directory estimate 37,iitlO 

1889, directory estimate 47,«U0 



km Mm PRICES 



TOOK THt FULL CURRENT. 

A Man Is Killed, Another Stunned and 
Hor»e Felled. 

Newburo, N. Y., Jan. 20. -This morn- 
ing a man stopped his horse in front of 
F. W. Parsons' shoe store on Water 
street. He tied the animal to an awn 
ing post and went away. .\ few moments 
later the horse touched his noe© to the 
iron post and fell into the gutter like a 
log. Thomas Dawson ran » to help the 
horse, but no sooner did he place his 
hands on the animal than he fell dead. 
Thomas .Saltz, who saw what happened, 
came to his assistance and took hold of 
him, but received a terrible shock and 
dropped to the ground as if dead. 

An uninsulated electric wire had 
sagged and lay upon an iron rod extend- 
ing from the awning i>oet of building 
and the full force of the eletrtric cur- 
rent was passing down the iron post into 
the ground. The insulation material of 
wire had become thoroughly spoiled by 
rain. 

Mr. Saltz was only stunned. He got 
up and walked away. Neither was the 
horse killed. It was cut loose from the 
post, lifted to its feet and driven off. 
Dawson was a laborer, a large and 
powerful man, weighing over 'iOOjjounds. 
He was well and favorably known and 
leaves a wife and children. There is 
great excitement and indignation in this 
city. The electric light wires, even 
when taut are only a few inches above 
the iron awning frames in front of build- 
ings. 

Negroes to Liberia. 

Washinoton, Jan. 20.— The seventy- 
third anniversary of the American Colon- 
ization society was held in the Church 
of the Covenant last evening. Rev. Dr. 
Hamlin, pastor of the church, presiding. 
Profeswir Edward W. Bivden, a negro 
from Liberia, made an address, in the 
course of which he said that there was a 
rapidly-growing conviction that the 
white and black races could not live in 
harmony. He was in favor of the return 
of the negroes to Africa. He spoke of 
Liberia as the garden spot of western 
Africa, and said that negroes who had 
gone from America were exerting great 
infiuence there. 



DEMOCRA TS REO RGANIZE. 

A Test Case in the .Mlver Bow Klection 
Muddle. 

Helena, Mont., Jan. 20.- -The repub- 
lican senate meets tonight, and there are 
rumors that it will reorganize the demo- 
cratic house in order that pubhc busi- 
ness may no longer be obstructed. 

In the supreme court today papers 
were filed on the application of William 
Thompson, one of the republican con- 
testants from Silver Bow county to coni 
pel the state auditor to issue his certifi- 
cate of election. The official replies that 
he has no knowledge that the applicant 
is entitled to the seat. The court took 
the papers. This is a test case. 

THROUGH THE DEPARTMENTS. 

Gen. Alger Starts Out to Inspect Military 
H eadq uarters. 

Detroit, Mich.. Jan. 20.— Gen. Alger 
left here yesterday on his official visit to 
the various departments. He visits the 
New England departments first and then 
New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, 
Maryland, Doleware, Virginia, West Vir- 
ginia, Kentucky, Tenneaaee, Ohio, and 
all the departments east of the Mississ- 
sippi. 

Thenoe in the order named ho gtjes to 
Minnesota, South Dakota, Nebraska, 
Kansjis, Arkansas, Texjis, New Mexico, 
Colorado, Nevada, California, Oregon and 
North Dakota. The trip will occupy 
several months. 

i;nlt«d to Ule. 

Buffalo, N. Y., Jan. 20._;-Prank 
Feirlej. a German shoemaker, 74 years 
of age, who lives at No. 47 Cjpress street 
with his widowed daughter, Mrs. Myers, 
and her 10-year old daughter, in a tit of 
deejtondency early this morning, pro- 
posed to his daughter that they should 
all end their lives by poisoning them- 
selves, iind, having some oxalic acid in 
the house, drugged the coffee. All three 
drank, the child being the only one 
ignorant of what she was doing. Feir- 
ley, who is said to have a terrible temper 
and to be a slave to liquor, has small 
chances of recovery. The woman's case 
is apparently most serious. It is thought 
that the little girl will recover. 



There was a constant stream of China- 
men entering Sam Moy's all day, and 
Sam Moy's face wore a smile of supreme 
content. When any customer entered 
he bowed to Sam Moy and siiid: "Kung- 
Hi." Sam Moy bowed to Ihe customer 
and replied: "Kung-Hi," which means: 
"I am your everlasting servant. I 
humbly bow myself at your feet. I 
offer you my sincerest wishes for a happy 
vear. May the moon love you. May 
your head' mingle with the stars. May 
peace and prt sperity l>e yours. 

By nightfall the place was crowded. A 
feast was set at G o'clock. This was the 
menu here as at other places: Bird's 
nest soup, shark-fin soup, fried fiat fish, 
shellfish, roast chicken, roast pig, roast 
duck, roast pigeon, rice gin, "medicine" 
wine oranges. 

At 10 o'clock the diners were getting 
warmed up to the festivities. The con- 
versation took the form of dialogues. 
One of the Chinamen yelled across the 
table to another Chinaman: "Happy 
New Year." "Happy New iear," re- 
plied the other Chinaman. "Good luck 
and prosi)erity to you." "And peace and 
happiness to you." "May you eat the 
skin of a roasted pig." "May wealth 
attend your ventures." "May your 
windows be unbroken." "May your fines 
be suspended." Whenever one of the 
Chinamen expressed a particularly strong 
sentiment all the other Chinamen ap- 
plauded by hammering their dishes with 
cups, and bowling up some more. 

A Fair Field. 

Washington, Jan. 20.— The speaker 
of the house has apiKDinttnl 
the World's fair committee as 
follows: Messrs. Candler of Massachu- 
setts, Hitt of Illinois, Bowden of Vir- 
ginia, Belden of New York, Frank 
Missouri, Springer of Illinois, Hatch 
Missouri, Wilson of West Virginia, 
Flower of Now York. On location 
fair committee stands as follows: 



Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon Storer of New 
York city, are stopping temporarily at 
the Cheltxjnham. The doctor is a den- 
tist and suriiains an enviabto reputation 
in the profession. He has passed 
throuuh a thorough course at Ann Ar- 
bor, and is also a gradute of the Phila- 
delphia Dental college. He will locate 
here. 

Mr. Albert Hanslait has been engaged 
as salesman with A. M. Griffin & Co., 
during Mr. Griffin's absence in the East. 

A. R. Ridgely of the firm of Marvin 
&, Ridgely returned this morning from 
Philadelphia where he has been visiting 
his parents the last four weeks. 

The many friends of Mrs. Thoe. Hul- 
bert will be glad to know that a cable 
received from her today announces her 
safe arrival in Paris with her little son, 
Allen. 

Mr. J. L. Washburne, the 
capitalist., is at The Spalding. 

Judge R. S. Tyler, the gniin 
sion luerchitnt, returned this 
from Fargo. 

Chief Clerk Thoiaas will have charge 
of the Northern Pacific local freight 
business in the absence of Manager 
Hartman. 

Mr. A. C. Clausen, chief grain in- 
spector, is registered at The Spalding. 

Mr. G. F. Piper, the well-known Man- 
kato business man, is a guest at The 
Spalding. 

Mr. W. C. McComber, the well-known 
iron man, is at the St. Louis. 

Mr. Stanley Proudfit, second assistant 

general freight agent of the Omaha 
road, is in the city. 

Mr. Elmer Hall, assistant ticket agent 
at the Duluth Union depot, is married 
this evening to Miss Taylor of Fond du 
Lac, Wis.; a sister of superintendent 
Taylor of the Rome, Watertown & Og- 
densburg road. The couple will return 
to this city after a short bridal tour. 

Captain James Boggs is again a happy 
father; this time it is a daughter, who 
arrived last week. 

Mr. Beriah Magoffin is up from Ken- 
tucky for a short real estate visit. 

Mr. Walter Marshall left yesterday for 
a visit with southern Wisconsin friends. 
Mr. B. F. Shanley went to St. Paul 
last night to be absent a couple of days. 
Treasurer A. M. Miller, Jr., of Temple 
Opera, has gone for a week's visit at his 
old home in Lincolu, III. 

The two-year-<jld son of Michiiel Deer- 
ing, of Oueota, died Saturday and was 
buried at Forest Hill cemetery this 
afternoon. 

Mrs. Royal F. King of Minneapolis, 
formerly Miss Vrooman, a well-known 
Duluth soprano singer, is visiting rela- 
tives in the city for a short time. 

Postal Clerk C. M. Lounsberry, a 
nephew of Col. Lounsljerry, at one time 
in newspaper work here, and who was 
injured in a railway wreck in Dakota, is 
visiting Col. Lounsberry's family here. 

Miss Tracy Hartman and Miss Susie 
Stearns left yesterday for California for 
the benefit of their health. They were 
accompanied by Mr. Alex. W. Hartman, 
who, after leaving California, will spend 
a short time in Mexico. I 

Miss Hardy, proprietor of the private I 
school in Eau Claire, that she is endeav- 
oring to move to Duluth, returned today 
to that city. It is more than probable 
that the school will be located here next 
fall, either at the East End or on the 
hill. 



DID THE PIOUS. 



An 



by 



Extensive Swindle Perpetrated 
English Nobleman. 

Little Rock, Ark., Jan. 2Cl.— A pecu- 
liar land swindle was unearthed here 
yesterday. It api>ears that a man giv- 
ing his name as Carles made his appear- 
ance in White county about six months 
ago. He at once installed himself in 
the good graces of the lot-al minister, 
Ilev. J. R Chumley, and to him Carles 
confided the statement that he was in 
reality an English nobleman traveling 
incognitio, and that he was possessor ot 
a fortune of fully gl(X).000,000, $4,(K)0,000 
of which was invested in Birmingham. 

The minister fell into the trap, and 
with his new found friend went to Little 
Rock where he introduced him as a man 
who was worthy of confident*. Carles 
purchased three fine farms adjacent, 
gained possession of the deeds and 
agreed to meet the sellers at a certain 
day and pay the amount. He failed to 
appear. The credulous farmers will en- 
deavor to recover titles to tiieir farms in 
the courts. 



Dfjjver, Jan. 20.- The snow blockade 
in th«i West and Northwest is one of the 
most aomplete on record. Not only has 
trave become an impossibility on the 
Westjrn divisions of the Central and 
Northern Pacific, but the telegraph oom- 
panies are equal sufferers and every 
through wire is down on both these 
routes. The only means of telegraphic 
coma tunication with the Pacific coast 
now, is by the indirect route of the 
Southern Pacific, and the volume of 
bueicess transacted is necessarily 
limititd. 

Wiishington and Oregon are shut off 
from communication with the entire 
work , with the exception of one little 
zig-ziig wire that still ticks feebly be- 
tween San Francisco and Portland. 
When this wire goes down, these two 
Nortli western states will be further 
away from New York than China so far 
as ttlegraphic communication is con- 
cern* d, as trains are not running and 
the saow blockade renders it impossible 
for a ay telegraph force to reach the 
seen* 1 of breaks. Western Union re- 
pairers are snowed up at a dozen points 
in the West and there is little prospect 
for ronewed communication until the 
railroads have mastered the elements. 

The worst snow blockade on the Cen 
tral .^acitic road is at Emigrant Gap, 
near the summit of the Sierras. Last 
nigh; all west-bound trains were snowed 
in at d tlie road cannot be opened in the 
next forty-eight hours, as the snow- 
plows cannot work and shovelers are 
st-arc e. There are 1500 men at work, but 
as snow is seven feet deep on a level 
and 'athomless in the cuts, the work of 
cleai ing the track while snow falls is a 
trerr endous labor. 

Oil the Northern Pacific there is a 
complete snow blockade at Sissons, near 
Mount Shasta. The Southern Pacific 
road has been badly injured in the 
Tehiichepi mountains by washouts, and 
beycnd Los Angeles floods have done 
much damtige. The only unobstructed 
road now is the Atlantic & Pacific, but 
as ttiis depends on Southern Pacific 
coniiCctions between Majave desert and 
San Francisco, and on the washed out 
8 'U ,hern Pacific line between Los 
Angeles and San Francisco, travel on 
thai line may also be delayed at any 
moi lent, as it has been raining heavily 
in wutliern California for days post, 
whi e it is snowing in the North. 

Snow IB still falling t<xlay throughout 
the West, so that the prospect is by no 
me» us encouraging. 



TROUBLE IN A CHURCH. 



Charges of Dishonesty Against the K«v. 
I>r. Beale. the Pastor. 
Johnstown, Pa., Jan 20. — The trouble 
in the Presbyterian church has now 
reached a crisis. At Sunday's meeting 
Dr. Beale demanded that Elder Fulcon, 
who is general man;iger of the Cambria 
Iron company, retract his charges of 
dishonesty. Mr. Fuiton, however, only 
modifietl the accusation. Dr. Beale then 
realized that he would have to summon 
the elder before the Presbytery to prove 
the charges. At the next meeting of 
the presbytery, therefore, the elder will 
be called upon to prove that his charges 
of dishonesty were true. After this Dr. 
Beale will resign the i)astorate. One of 
the elders states that he has been reli- 
ably informed that Dr. Beale intends to 
take Mr. Fulton's case into the supreme 
court and has engaged counsel to look 
after his interest. 



Chiragoans Uuy Arkansait Lands. 

LiTTLK Rock, Ark., Jan. 20.— The sale 
is jnnounced today of 200,000 acres of 
timber lands in southeast Arkansas be- 
longing to the Iowa and Arkansas Land 
con pany. The purchasers are Chicago 
cap talists. The price is stated to have 
bee 1 §5 per acre. 

That Nasty Moore Case. 

^[INNEAPOLIs, Sept. 20.— ISpcial.l— 
Ju( ge Smith today refused a divorce to 
Mrt). Dr. J. A. Moore, whose husband is 
suing State Senator Cloughforhis wife's 
seduction. 



of 
of 
and 
for 
For 
Chiciigo, Hitt and Springer; for St. 
Louis, Hat<;h and Frank; for New York, 
Belden and Flower; for Wiishington, 
Bowden and Wilson. The chairman. A. 
R. Ca'jdler, is satisfactory to all contend- 
ing parties as one not committed to the 
interests of any particular city. 

Kegistrution Days. 
Tomorrow and Wednesday are regis- 
tration days. All desirous of voting 
should be sure to register. The last 
chance for registration will be a week 
from tomorrow. 



Register .Kcsume. 

At The Spalding: A. Rosenhome, C. 
C. Fowler, E. L. Post, New York; Louis 
L. Loeb, D. S. Allen, S. S. Davis, E. B. 
Sevygard, W. H. Menden, Jr., Chicago; 
C. S. Musser, P. W. Richards, St. Paul; 
B. F. Goodsell, Portage; J. C. Linneel, 
Detroit; W. A. Waraen, Boston; J. M. 
Underwood, J. D. Theehan, S. C. Tucker, 
Minneapolis; C. A. Boalt. St. Louis. 

At the St. Louis: S. Sehgman, New 
York; James Ryan, H. S. Swift, Chicago; 
A. N. McDowell, Cloquet: Charles Rupp, 
East Saginaw; J. A. McDougal, Mandan, 
N. D., J. F. Fergusson, Fergus Falls. 

At the Merchants: D. J. Smith, James 
Farrell, Cloquet; C. J. Wall, Chicago; J. 
H. Grey, Thomson; F. A. Pettibone, 
Luddon, N. I).; T. L. Davidson, St. Paul. 



Another Big Gas Well for Peru. 

Peru, Ind., Jan. 20.— The Jumbo gas 
well of Indiana was found soulh of this 
city yesterday. Attempts to confiue it 
prrned futile. The output is tremen- 
doua. V 



The .Vngelus at Chicago. 

Chicago, Jan. 20.— The Angel us, the 
celebrated painting for which 8110,000 
was recently paid, was placed on exhibi- 
tion this morning in the Exposition 
building. It comes to Chicago through 
the inrtuence of Mr. James W. Ells- 
worth, an influential and wealthy citizen 
and patron of the fine arta and who has 
given his personal bontl of $200,000 for 
its safe return to New York. It will re 
main in Chicago until the period for 
which it is bonded to the United States 
government expires. 

National Convention ot Engineers. 

CHARLE.4TON, N. C, Jan. 20.— The an- 
nual convention of the National En- 
gineers Beneficial association of the 
United States opens tomorrow, and the 
officers with a number of delegates ar- 
rived this morning. The annual reports 
will show that in every respect the or- 
ganization is in a highly satisfactory oon. 
dition. 



A Fine Concert. 

Last night a concert of tine character 
was given by Schillings orchestra at 
Turner hall. A fair-sized audience was 
present, who appeared to thoroughly en- 
Joy themselves. The concert was purely 
orchestral, the selections being from 
the standard composers. Some of the 
selections were from "Faust," Gaunod; 
"Trovatore, ' Verdi; "Potpourri German 
Songs," Franke, and "Summer Evening 
Waltze," Waldtenfel. It is the desire to 
continue these concerts each alternate 
Sunday evening, the admission being 
placed at ten cents. The next will be 
held two weeks from last night, and 
thereafter every two weeks. 

Two Schools of Training. 

Life: Mabel— Sunday Bch(X)l teacher 
says we musn't complain of our lot, an' 
that if we're good we'll get our reward 
hereafter! Maud-Mother says if I 
ain't goo«l she'll break every bone in my 
body. 



More Tribulation Today. 

Two new breaks occurred in the water 
pipes Saturday night, one in the 18 inch 
main on Superior street and New York 
avenue, and the other on First street in 
the same vicinity. The water is turned 
off at Fourteenth avenue, so that resi- 
dents at that end will be cut off until 
the repairs are made. 

The liishop Will Receive. 

Bishop McCiolrick has Ijeen enter- 
tained bv Duluth; he will now receive 
his friends. Tomorrow afternoon and 
evening the bishop's residence at 207 
West Fourth street, will be thrown open 
for the reception of i)arishioners and all 
others who wish to attend, that a more 
intimate relation may prevail between 
the citizens and the bishop. 



on struck at I'arkersburg. 

I'AKKKRSBURO, W. Vb., Jan. 20. An oil 
well producing 300 barrels a day wiie 
str ick today near here. The strike has 
created great excitement. Four thou- 
sard acres have been leased about the 
city and 81,000,000 raised to test the 
territory. Capitalists have arrived here 
from various points to look over the 
field. 

Three Were Drowred. 

Oquawka, 111., Jan. 20.— Elmer Freed, 
Silas Tracy, Chas. Wilson and Alexander 
Wliitmore of Gladstone, III, were 
dntwned in (Jrisworld's slough, near 
Burlington last night. They started for 
a dance but their team Ijecame un- 
mt nageable and backed the wagon over 
tho bank and broke through the ice. 
The body of Freed was recovered. Both 
horses were drowned. 

straits of Cheboygan Clozed. 

i;3heboyga»:, Mich., Jan. 20.— Large 
fields of ice moved down into the chan- 
nel yesterday, between here and Bois 
BUnc, and today the whole mass is 
frtizen solid. This closes the straits, 
which is about ten days later than last 
yeir. 

Insult to Injur}-. 
.\t the Endion Baptist church fiome- 
bcdv put a counterfeit quarter ^ith a 
h( le in it in the contribution box. The 
ovner can have the same by calling on 
Oil. N. A. Gearhart. 



ALMOST LEGITIMATE. 

Couuterfeitem who Make a Dollar ai> Good 
as theiioveminent'sOwn. 

New York, Jan. 20. — The Evening Sun 
publishes a sensational article, purport- 
ing to give details of a gigantic counter- 
feiting business, said to have been car- 
ried on by (certain citizens of Mexico. It 
states that these individuals have within 
the past two years coined r»,UOO,000 of 
our silver dollars and after shipping 
them acrose the border have disposed ot 
them with a profit to themselves of 
twenty -eight cents on each dollar. 

The Sun says that during the past few 
days rumors to the above effect have 
been afloat in Wall street, but have l>een 
carefully confined to a few promment 
bankers and financiers, who have taken 
extraordinary precautions to prevent the 
reports from getting beyond their own 
little circle. 

This is the conclusion which bankers 
in Texas, New Mexico and .Vrizona have 
arrived at as the result of their investi- 
gations: That a band of Mexicans have 
been coining United States silver dollars 
and uttering them to Mexicans, wno 
gave them in return for goods pur- 
chased on this side. Perhaps there is 
more than one of these institutions. 
Gentlemen who are investigating this 
gigantic plot are of the opinion 
that this wholesale counterfeiting has 
been going on for over two years, 
and that at least 5,000,00(> counterfeit 
di>ilare have been foiuted upon the citi- 
zens of this country by the Mexicans. 
How the dollars are uttere<l investigat- 
ors do not know. It is posstble that 
these "private banks utter the coins 
directly through their own employes to 
]>eople across the border. In that way 
they would secure to themselves the 
whole profit of alxjut twenty -eight cents 
on each coin. Or.and this idea seems much 
more plausible, they utter coins to Mexi- 
cans at a compromise value. Mexicans 
thus iu«ume all risk in connection with 
passing the dollars, and although it is a 
small rise, get their coin for less than $1 
in consequ ence. 

Boston's Thanksgiving. 

Boston, Jan. 20.— An official list of the 
lodses by the Thanksgiving day fire in 
this city is made public by the Boston 
protective department. From these re- 
turns it appears that the total loss was 
Si,84 1,388. Insurance involved was $5,- 
iJlio.'JiSS, while the loss to insurance com- 
panies was iS,3,173,438, or a little over 58 
per cent of the total insurance and 82.G 
per cent of the total loss. The loss not 
insured was H'lGL'Sih 



REA L EST ATE. 

A Record of the Real t.state Transfers for 

34 Hours, Ending at Noon. 

Moses Stewart to S F Moles, lots 5, 6, 7, 
8 '.I 10, tl and 13, »>lock 14,and lots 8 and 
it' lIUK'k Vi, Stewarts addition to West 

liuhil h .•••„••,• I ■• V 

H H Mvers to K W Warner, lot 3, liloclt 

«, Bav View addition ... 

W t' Siirg-eiit to Sarah J .Uonta>rue. lot 

(i. block 1, w'^ of proprietors res«Tva- 

tion of London iiiidillon 

Miirtyn Wheeler to Freeman Keen 

divided Vi luteresi 

41*-ir> ■ ■ •■ 

C 11 Haines to D A Duncan, undivided 

4-.") of e'» of seVi, and of se?* of ne>^i, 

34-.'i;H6 : \< c\- ,• 

J M Smith to D Morris<m, lot 12, block 

21, KImberley & Strykers addition. . 
it Stuntz to Elmore H Wells, wH 



un- 

o',i Of nw)*, ;i- 



3,600 
.350 

ao 

3,000 

75 
155 



We have a house of ten rooms^ gootl 
woll and cistern, size of lot 50x150, on 
Eiist Second street, at a remarkable bar- 
gt in. To anyone wanting to buy a home 
this is your opiwrtunity. 

D. H. Stkvenson & Co., 
43 Exchange building. 



Minnie Palmer Wants Her Salary. 

London, Jan. 20. — Playgoers who 
went to Her Majestys theater to see 
Minnie Palmer as Cinderella were dis- 
appointed, though her name is still on 
the bills, because of the fact that her 
salary, a large one, was overdue, and for 
some reason not forthcoming, and per- 
centage receipts not bemg paid, she 
simply refused to appear, and if a com- 
promise is not reached tomorrow she 
will go from Charles Harris pantomime 
to Gus Harris' rival pantomime at Drury 
Lane. 



Honorable Marcus, of Atwater. 
Washington, Jan. 20.— The President 
today sent to the senate the following 
nominations: Marcus Johnson, district 
of Minnesota, to be collector of internal 
revenue. 



To Skaters. 

The ice at the East End Skating rink 
is in perfect •ondition and should be 
well patronized this afternoon and even- 
ing by lovers of the sport. The attend- 
ance for Saturday was in the neighbor- 
hood of .500 at this rink. 

The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



For acres adjoining Lakeside and Les- 
ter Park see E. W. Markell, Hotel St. 
l/ou'iB block, ground floor 



Look This Up. 

A double corner on the upper 
East Second street in Endion. 



this week, «I600, 
and 2 years. D 



Bide ot 
Price for 
1 



of se'i of swU of sw^.^. 4-4H-I5. 



i,i cash; balance m 
H. Stevenson & Co., 
43 Exchange building. 



George 

of se'iOi sw'^oi Bw-A.' ,^^ , _ 

Albert Harrlntrton to M Merrltt, lot 

block 12, Han ingtons addition 

A M Miller to D A Duncan, undivided 

4-5 of e',of scU and of pbH of ne>4, 

34-.'i3-lfi 

C K Ulckerman to Samu<?l F Boy> e, lots 

» and 10, blixik 34, VfvM End addition 
1 W Litchfield to W J Uiites, lots I, 4. 6 

and «. and seV of so^*, «»-(>4-19 ... ■ ■ ■ 
S F Boye<< to U Lockliart, lot «, block 24, 

West Kud addition....... •■■.-••,■••■•■ 

S F Boy CO to Michael Shanuhan, lot 10, 

block 34, West End addition 

13 transfers; total WO.BOO 



876 
B75 

IGO 
(>50 
500 
475 
475 



REAL. ESTATE. 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

2 Lots on Superiorstreet, Endion, very cheap. 
200 Acres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on the hill below 
the market. 



for 



I 00 Acres in 4-50-14, 26 per cent below the market. 
63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. *^ ... 

A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe s Addition 

sale on easy terms. . ... x u. ^».. 

A few desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash- pay- 
ment, if improved. ___^____^____^ 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 0, Metropolitan Block. 



^l 



i«^ 



1 



—*— 



»;* tl Ji- n.iu.ni 



I. 



;- *V * r r i ' i^ Tr t...% .! 



• * ^ r m t m ' 




■*- 



I 






T 




EVE^IKa HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD. Publisher. 



PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

XlaJly, by mall, per year 'I'22 

Dally, by mall, £er three months 2.00 

Dally, by mall, per one month 'b 

IN TH« CITY. 

Dally, by carrier, per week '8 

Entered at the poetofflce at Duluth, Mlna., aa 
second-oiasa mall matter. 



omit to 
worth. 



play them for all they are 



^~The Washington office of The Herald Is 
at \iiU New York avenue, N. W.jWhere the 
paper is kept on file and where The Herald 
oorrespoudent wlU welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



Call for Kepublican Caacua. 

All legTilly (juallH-d voters who Intend to 
vote for the repuhlioau oautUdiites tor the 
various offices to W- UUed in the city of Duluth 
on Februarj i. imi. at the regular city elec- 
tion, are heix'by notifled that caucuses wU. l>e 
held between the hours of 5 and > p. m., on 
January -4, K-W>, for tlie purpose of electing 
delegates to the city republican convention. 

Tlie places for holding caucuses and the 
numl>or of delegates to wtilch each precinct is 
entitlt-d have l)een establishes! as follow: 

t'irst ward— Asa Daley's lumber office, 4^3 
Lake avenue south. 

Second ward— James McBeth's store. East 
Superior street. 

Third ward. First Precinct— Store buUdlug, 
first avenue east and First street. 

Second prec-inct— XJI Kast Superior street. 

Thin! precinct— East End livery barn. 

Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
street. 

Second prfcinct-319 West Superior street. 

Third precinct- 701 West Superior street. 

Jlfih ward. First preciuct- Itk* West Su- 
perior street. 

.S.voud precinct— <i36 Gartleld avenue. 

Tliir.1 preeinet— lasa West >fiehigan street. 

.■^ixtli ward— :^I West Michigan street. 

Tile basis of representation has l>een tlxed at 
one delegate to eai-h UKj votes or maj ir frac- 
tion thereof cast tor the repubhcan candii'.ate 
at the last presidential election, and one dele- 
gate at large for each precinct. 

Each ward is entitled to the following repre- 
sentation: First ward, 4 deicgates; Second 
ward, 3 delegites; Third ward. First precinct 
4 delegates: Sei-ond preeint, '3 delegates: Third 
precinct,:) delegates; Fourth ward. First pre- 
cinct, 5 delegates; Second precinct, 4 delegates; 
Third precinct, 3 delegates: Filth ward. First 
precinct, 3 delegates; Second precinct, 4 dele- 
gates. Third precinct. S delegates; SLith ward, 
J delegates. 

James Di>"Ow.\.l.i., 
John H. LAV'AgtrE, 
P. S. AsxEiLe. 
Ch.\ri-es Dusc.vjf, 

11. S. L(»KD, 

S. M. Lesteb, 
City KepubUcan Com. 



After all Duluth's weather isn't so 
bad. We read of cyclonee, cloud burets, 
tornadoes, rtoods; of mud and filth. The 
telegraph columns today tell of the ter- 
rible snow blockades, by which two 
states are practically no nearer than the 
moon, while the entire west coast beats 
responsively to the Union by but a sin- 
gle vein that may be cut at any mo- 
ment. Storms and blockades, pestilence 
and floods come not near us. 



There is a guessing contest on. And 
The Herald offers cash prizes large 
enough to make the guessing an object 
to anyone. There is probably 
no subject of such general local interest 
as the population of this city, especially 
since the growth of the past ten years, 
or since the census of 1870, 
has tindoubtedly been proportion- 
ately larger than that of any other 
place in the United States. There are 
few subjects on which there is more 
diversity of opinion, people who believe 
themselves conservative estimating from 
—well, differing widely. Recollect that 
any one can have as many guesses as he 
wants, providing each is on a coupon, 
and that the limits included are Duluth, 
West Duluth, Lakeside and Lester 
Park. Now guess! 



THEIR INNERMOST THOUGHTS. 



Call for City Kepublican Convention. 

All duly elected delegates to the city repub- 
lican convention will meet in the council room 
at ilie city ha. I, Duluth, Minnesota, on Jan. :S, 
l!«in, at -' p. m , for the purpose of placing in 
notuiiiation republican candidates for the var- 
ious offices as loUows: Maior; two aldermen, 
first ward; one alderman. Second ward ; one 
alderman. Thir\l ward; one alderman. Fourth 
ward ; one alderman. Fifth ward ; one alder- 
man. Sixth ward. 

M. U. H.\LL, Chairman Com. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



A SEARCH FOR SALVATION. 

Under the srare heatl. "St. Paul Can 
Create," The Pioneer Press of yesterday 
prinis the result of a noteworthy can- 
vass of that agitated city in search of a 
remedy for its constitutional weakness, 
'*a weakness that is of vital moment to 
its prosperity." It succeeds in getting 
together a really remarkable bundle of 
prescriptions from the foremost business 
men of the city, from which we make 
aigniticant extracts in another column. 
For this search for salvation is really of 
more living interest to Duluth than it is 
t*j St. Paul, showing as it does how 
rattled our elder sister is getting to be 
in view of recent the remarkable growth 
of the head of the lakes, and the showing 
of our exceptional advantages for manu- 
facturing and jobbing, which are now 
oominji out in a clear light to all parts 
of the country. And it is moreover a 
timely recognition of the essential im- 
portance of rightly placed manufactur- 
ing industries to the healthy develop- 
ment of a city that hopes to be great — a 
reojgnition that should appeal to us at 
Duluth more strongly and impressively 
than to those for whose immediate 
benefit it is made, inasmuch as our 
natural advantages far transcend the 
possibilities of St. Paul, and our future 
lies far more completely in our own 
hands. 

It is good for us therefore to look 
through this bundle of prescriptions one 
by one. and take them toheartourselves, 
for the prescrioers are men whose opin- 
ions are of the first practical value. 
Every word spoken for the advantage of 
St. Paul scores moie heavily still for 
Duluth and every suggestion of indus- 
tries suited to the conditions of our sis- 
ter city applies without the change of a 
line to Duluth as well or better. Be- 
sides let it never be lost sight of that 
the disadvantages that confessedly ap- 
ply to St. Paul are not ours. We are 
not called on to pay an overland freight 
cost of fuel, which puts all manufactur- 
ing at a disadvantage and makes cer- 
tain lines of manufacturing virtually im- 
practicable in the face of competition 
here. Xor have we the charges to meet 
for the double handling of all freight 
via the head of tlie lakes to and from 
St. Paul, nor the cost of shipping over- 
land t<j no purpose. 150 miles across the 
the channel of transcontinental com- 
merce. No wonder SL Paul winces 
under these galling disadvantages, but, 
thank fortune, our withers are unwrung. 

It is good for us, too, by every legiti 
mate means anfl united, public-spirited 
effort to circulate this bundle of pre- 
scriptions and confessions to the farthest 
end of the country. For they show 
what can be done here and what should 
be done here by enterprising manufac- 
turers and jobbers in search of the most 
profitable location for business. True, 
some may go to St. Paul rather than to 
Duluth, in face even of this transparent 
confession of fear and weakness, but we 
have a certain assurance in the fat;t of 
the substantial common sense of 
the business men of the coun- 
try that St. Paul must bid high 
for these whom she diverts from locating 
at the head of the lakes and Duluth 
will not grudge the gift of the slop-over 
here to SL Paul. So The Herald gladly 
gives the full benefit of its circulation in 
both its daily and weekly editions to St. 
Paul in her search for salvation, and 
hopes that many papers East and West 
will help on the good work. St. Paul's 
best chance lies in her power of joining 
hands and hustling for business. She 
has this i>ower and she has shoxn that 
she knows how to use it too. With her 
experience, her spirit, her will and her 
power, she is likely to make a strong 
pull for anything she wants, and she 
will not sit down on her side track with- 
out a strenuous effort to go ahead. Du- 
luth cannot afford to be outclassed in 
public spirit and well-directed energy 
and lean back indolently on her natural 
advantages. We have the cards to beat 
St- Paul out of sight, but we must not 



"The chances for Investment in Duluth real 
estate are just as good as they were two or 
three years ago, only it takes a little more 
money : that's all," remarked a man with an 
air which carried the conviction that he spoke 
from e-xperlence. His next words ci^nflrmed 
this impression. "Yes," he continued, sadly, 
"I've lost two chances to get rich In three 
years. The first time I was offered a block in 
Endion dirt.sion for what I thought a pretty 
stiff figure, and though 1 could have raised the 
cash readily, wouldn't venture. In two years 
the property more than (juadrupled. Since 
then 1 have refused a chance in West Duluth 
which would have netted me Wti.OOO, and now 
I want somebody to kick me twice in the 
same place. Though I believe this city will be 
as large as the combiuet} Twins,' and that 
these hillsides will be covered with blocks i>nd 
residences, I suppKjse I shall go on losing 
chances right along. It isn't that a man needs 
business tact or Judgment iu selecting snaps- 
Any wbere, if you can get hold of anything, 
even a mile or two out, is bound to bring a 
hirgc return. I believe the next five years 
will see Duluth's present population doubled." 
* * * 
A curious story is told of General Manager 
Fitch of the Duluth, South Shore i Atlantic. 
When Mr. Fitch was managing the Fremont, 
Elkhorn Jfc Missouri valley branch of the 
Northwestern, ho received a telegram from 
President Van Home of the Canadian Pacific 
railroad to meet him in Chicago. This was 
after the Canadian Pacific railroad got hold of 
the Duluth road. Fitch met an intimate 
friend before he saw the Canadian manager 
and told him of what he expecte<), an offer on 
the Duluth road. The friend said : "I'll just 
give you a pointer. You watch Van Home 
closely. If he sits down, takes things very 
cixiUy and makes you an offer, teH him the 
very lowest you will go for. If he walks 
around the room restlessly and hitches up his 
pantaloons, raise him a couple of thousand. 
And if he pulls his pants nearly up to his knee, 
sidles up to a table and sits on it sideways, 
raise him loOOU." Van Home did the latter. 
Mr. Fitch asked him f 15,000 a year, got It in a 
twinkling, and today the Zenith City Short line 
has one of the best managers in the country. 



A Railroader: In the death of Vice- 
President Dudley the St. Paul & Duluth 
not only loses one of the very best 
officials it ever had, but Duluth can see 
in many of the St. Paul Jt: Duluth im- 
provements monuments to a railroad 
man who was a true friend to this city. 

Hon. Dick CuUen: I can afford to 
take no notice of newspaper articles that 
reflect on me. when I know the same 
were inspired i)y jealousy and prompted 
by envy. 

Etlitor Grigsby of The Industrial Age: 
I am glad to see The Herald is taking 
some notice of the cause of lalior and 
the wage- workers apprtciate it. It's 
news, too, of a mighty important nature. 

Alderman C. A. Long: Ves, I am a 
candidate for the mayoralty nomination, 
if it is thrust upon me, but I'm not 
scratching around to got it. I'm in the 
hands of my friends. 

W. B. Dean: There is no use trying 
to convince me that manufactories for 
which steel and iron are the principal 
prerequisites are the sort we waut in St. 
Paul; I've tried and I know better. 
When every bit of material has to come 
500 miles the haul makes a deadly dif- 
ference. 1 believe in manufactories of 
clothing, boots end shoes. Has fiber, 
woolen goods and f>erhaps cotton, if we 
can get it here cheap enough. But iron 
—never. 

MAYORALTY ACROSTI-. 



A prominent Pythian and a democrat: 

. Gatt> City -J ewels, Nt). 3.">. 
Agate L O dge. 

Amet H yut division. 
DUmo N d Lodge. 

La H> cslde division. 

Damascus dlvl 8 ion. 

Dulut U division. 

Syr A cuse Lodge. 
Eudo \V ment Rank. 939. 



STATE tDITORS' IDEAS. 



THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



S. A. Siverts, cashier at Bell il: Co.'s bank at 
tlie West End, will > ery likely bo an alder- 
manic candidate, and is one of the strongest 
men the republicans can put up in the Sixth 
ward. Not much attention is being paid by 
West Enders as to who will be our next mayor. 
John K. Shaw's name Ls being frequently men- 
tioned by the democrats, while J. B. Sutphin 
would have the support which ho bad 
at the last election. M. O. Hall's name 
is heard, while in his own ward Swanstrom 
seems to be a favorite. 

if * if 

"One of the objections brought forward by 
many to the appointment of a well-known 
lumberman to a land office place," said a 
wealthy lumberman yesterday, "is that he is 
not fitted to do a great amount of clerical 
work- Now, that's all bosh. I've run a saw 
mill a good many years and made money at it, 
but I can't file a saw, or run an engine, or fill 
a boiler, or handle a yoke of oxen, or keep 
hooks or sell lumber. I don't 'spose there are 
a dozen men at the head of big businesses here 
in Duluth who could do the work tbelr book- 
keepers do." 

* * m 

James Rooney, from the quiet precincts of 
the Sixth ward, was an applicant for first citi- 
zenship papers this morning, but while getting 
the papers issued he requested the officials to 
keep the matter of his application from the 
newspapers. Mr. Rooney is manager of one 
of the branch offices of the Northwestern 
Fuel Cf)mpany in the West End and looms up 
as a candidate for aldermanlc honors in the 
Sixth ward. Mr. Rooney had to be natural- 
ized before he could bold office. 



Crookston Journal: Why don't our 
good Uncle Sam include wheat options 
under the gambling law? Why don't 
the Farmers alliance take hold of the 
matter, stick a pin into him and wake 
the old gentleman up to a realizing sense 
of his duty? Why don't every farmer 
who is suffering from the effects of wheat 
gambling join the alliance and work for 
this end':* 

Winona Herald: It is reported that 
Hon. J. B. (lilfillan will again be a can- 
didate for congress next fall. If this re- 
port proves true, alas for steamboat ex- 
cursions and pansy beds. Winona is a 
good many miles from the Fourth Con- 
gressional district, but not far enough to 
escape the chill that will radicite there- 
from. If theSt. Paul people really wante d 
an ice palace this winter, they should 
have sprung this GilfiUan report sooner. 

iVloorhead News: It is reported that 
the secretary of the interior at the sug- 
gestion of the commissioner of the gen- 
eral land office has requested Congress- 
man Comstock to make recommenda- 
tions for new appointments as register 
and receiver of the Duluth land ollice, 
and that Mr. Ck^mstock finds it exceed- 
ingly difficult to make selections, there 
are so many good men applying for the 
places. May the best men be appointed, 
and if the appointees are independent 
of the mining rings, pine rings and 
great corporations and [)roof against 
their corrupting influences, there will be 
great praise for Mr. Comstock. 

The Pine Knot Vidette. Cloquet's con- 
solidated paper, deals the shop-keepers 
and retailers of that town a sound drub- 
bing for their lack of enterprise and 
their carelessness m regard to the inter- 
ests of the local paper. The Pine Knot- 
Vidette is a first-rate country journal, a 
good deal better than Cloquet deserves, 
and The Herald hopes it will pound some 
sense of their duty towards a newspaper 
into the heads of its readers. 



A SHORT HftLF Ml 



Building Inspector Makes His 

Report to January 

First. 



One Month Shows Permits for 

Over Half a Million of 

Work. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



THE PILLS. 



fbt. 



I Lowell Mail.l 
See the 8ugar-coate<l pills. - 
Vulnlne pills! 
How they tell of influenza and other horrid 
ills! 
How they make us tjualm and quiver. 

In the stillness of the night. 
As we mutter, "How's your liver?" 
And turn over with a sliiver. 

When the grippe has grabbed us tight. 
We're in pain, pain, pain. 
From our toe-nails to our brain. 
And an (X)zy perspiration, that clammily dis- 
tills 

From our ills, ills, ills, iUs. 
Ills. Ills, llls,- 
Owes its oriirin unpleasant to the pills. 

Rea<l the doctor's little bills.— 
Ctolden bills! 
What a tale of terror, their reading now In 
stills! 

How the stilly hours of night 
Found us each in sickly pll 
Sipping nauseating stuff 

From out aspoon. 
And the liqu'd i Was it rough? 
Well! You bet your bottom dollar it was 
tough 

As a loon; 
An aggravation of Ills 
Made voluminously mean by sugar-coated 
pills. 

Quinine pills 
How one thrills 
At the name; how It fills 
With the rapture of squills: 
And our waking and our dreaming 
Is of pill.s. pills, pills. 
And of bills, bills, bills, 
, _ ^ Pills, pills, pllls,- 

And the doctor who has socked her for his pills. 

Korrect, Why ShouUI She? 

Sault Ste. Mane Democrat: There 
was a time ages agone when the entire 
East paid toll and tribute to Tyre, whose 
merchantmen traded in every port on 
the great sea. There was a time also 
when the entire Northwest paid toll and 
tribute to Chicago. That time is past. 
Why should she kick against the pricks 
of fate? 



It is said that Senator Evarts, Chaun- 
cey M. Depew and Robert G. Ingersoll 
never take any exercise, in the ordinary 
sense of the word, yet they are all vigor 
ous men. 

Col. Voieikoff, an officer of the Czar's 
body guard, and some other officers of 
the same corps, have committed suicide. 
It is supposetl they were implicated in a 
recently discovered plot against the life 
of the Czar. 

Mr. Edison has just imported a beauti 
ful marble statue called "The (renins of 
Light," which he bought at the Paris 
exhibiUon. The duties on it were S8lX). 

Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes, the Rev. 
Samuel May, and the Rev. S. F. Smith 
recently dined together in Boston. They 
were graduated from Harvard in the 
famous class of IS'JO. 

The Empress Eugenie has just pre- 
sented to the fathers who have the 
keeping of the mortuary chapel at Farn- 
borough, where the remains of Napoleon 
III, and the prince imperial are interred, 
a magnificent altar cloth, made from her 
wedding gown. 

Col. J. D. Stevenson, who, when he 
went to the Pacific coast, took with him 
1000 men to aid in the conquest of Cali- 
fornia, has just celebrated ii^ San Fran- 
cisco bis 90th birthday. 

Mr. Charles Hallock. the founder of 
American journalism on field and water 
sports, and one of the best known writers 
on outdoor life, is now permanently con 
nected with the editorial department of 
The American Angler. 



Building Inspector Shanley has just 
completed his first official report and 
will submit the same to the city council 
soon. -V glance at the figures gives some 
idea of the number of buildings, the 
cost of the same, number of permits is- 
sued, and some other items of interest 
in connection. 

In July, from the 19th, when the in- 
spector qualified, 40 building permits 
were filed, only two being of brick, one 
costing $0,000, the other 83,52o. Of the 
;]8 frame structures 30 were dwellings 
built by M B. Harrison in Brookdalo at 
a cost of ;&14,000. Inspector's feys were 
1590. Total cost of buildings this month 
was ^0,IJ50. I'ermits were issued in 
-Vugust for 16 buildings. Of these 5 
were of brick, the costliest being i 
dwelling houses put up by C. M. (Jray at 
a cost of i$'2.5,000, and the Spalding resi- 
dence which cost $12,000. The other 3 
were small buildings. Eleven frame 
buildings were erected, the total cost of 
both frame and brick structures being 
^75,700. Ins])ector'B fees, ^80.50. 

Only three brick buildings were noted 
in .\ugU8t, but the aggregate cost of 
these was large. The Chamber of Com- 
merce 8250,CXX), and the Palladio build- 
ing a-J-^OOO. At the West End the gas 
works was booked, costing about 620.000. 
the principal materials used in its con 
struction being brick, stone, iron and 
slate. A. fine church for the Norwegian 
Evangelical Lutherans was erected, 
whiod coat $10,000. Seventeen frame 
buildings in all were put up. Total cost 
of all buildings for .\ugust reached the 
sum of half a million dollars. The in 
spector's fees were 6'2(>5. 

Seventeen buildings were commenced 
in October; many were finished and 
others being in an advanced state of 
completion. There were four bricks, 
the finest of which is the Hoppman 
building, which is almost finished and 
cost 1^11,000, and the solid little structure 
which Clague A Prindle will use for an 
office, which cost glO,000. The cost- 
liest frame buildings were those of 
Clinton Markell, which will cost $10,000 
above the foundation. The foundation 
cost nearly or quite 810,000, being very 
large and blasted out of the solid rock 
to a depth of 9 or 10 feet. M. B. Harri 
son's fine residence was also commenced 
this month and will cost something over 
32o,0iX>. The total cost of all buildings 
for this month was 6134.400. Inspectors' 
fees, 6106.50. 

November was the banner month for 
brick structures, there being 10 com- 
menced, among them the Endion school, 
6(W,(X>0; Brown Bros." handsome store on 
Superior street, 6'27,000; A. W. Bradley's 
fine residence, 614,000, a three-story 
building on East Superior street for H. 
E. Long, 6'20,0a) and Henrv- W. C-offin's 
elegant place on Fourth street, between 
Seventh and Eighth avenues east, 611,- 
000. There were '29 permits issued this 
month. Total cost of buildings, 61->8,- 
600; inspector's fees. 613-3.50. In De- 
cember 11 i>ermits were issued, four 
being brick, the Buchanan building, 
which will cost when completed 6'25.000; 
Capt. Barker's 3 houses, each costing 
$9000. Seven small frame buildings 
were also commenced and mostly fin- 
ished. The total cost of buildings for 
December was 655,195; inspector's fees, 
652. 

To recapitulate, the total cost of 
buildings was 680,050; August, 60.5,700; 
September, 8500,000; October, 134,400; 
November, 8158,600; December, 655,195, 
making a grand total of 6994,545. It 
must be remembered, too,t hat the cost of 
V)uildings is systematically lowered in es- 
timates on which the permits are based. 
The total amount of fees received by the 
building inspector was 6727.50. 



STATE NEWS. 



Briggs— Wonder what possessed him 
him to jump int<j the river';? 

Braggs— There was a woman at the 
bottom of it. I believe. 

A Freak of Heredity Exposed. 

Mrs. Hickes— What a pretty blonde 
Mifls King-Chester is! But she's an 
anomaly to me. I know the family well. 
All the Kings were brunettes, and the 
Cheaters were all dark, too. Where can 
she get her light hair from";:* 

Miss Wickes — From Paris. 



.V family of Scandinavians who recently 
arrived at Hallock, applied tt> the authori- 
ties for their first meal in the United 
States. Six cases of leprosy have de- 
veloped in this county among this class 
of emigrants, one of which is now in the 
last stage of wretched putrefaction. The 
Allan Steamship company has been 
sending undesirable passengers over the 
boundary through this locality. 

Neem Nelson put down a drive well at 
Gordonsville, and after the pipe iiad 
been driven, workmen tried to lower a 
bolt to test the depth of the water, but 
the bolt clung to the sides, tne pipe 
being heavily charged with magnetism. 

A portion of the town of St. Joseph, 
Stearns county, held an election to in- 
corporate as a village, which resulted in 
a vote of 46 to 18 for incorporation. 

The thirty-second annual meeting of 
the Swedish Lutheran Augustana con- 
ference will be held at Red Wing on the 
evening of Feb. 7. Several hundred dele- 
gates are expecte<l. 

Joseph Hail, Sr., one of the oldest set- 
tlers of .Vlbert Lea, died here last night 
of the grip, being over 80 years of age. 

Blood poisoning from a kid glove kills 
a young lady in West St. Paul. 

Just Hide a Wee. 
Superior Times: It cannot be de 
pied that the loss of two large lumber- 
ing enterprises which wanted to locate 
here, but have been turned away, and 
the opening of the rival townsite of 
South Superior, in which members of 
the land company are interested, and 
the locating of a large wagon plant 
there, are good reasons for the deei) dis- 
trust of the Consolidated Land company 
which has taken possession of those who 
have staked their all on old Superior. 
The work of this meeting is looked for 
with much anxiety by our people. They 
have a right to know what the policy of 
the company is to be. If a city is to be 
built here it must be begun. A dilly- 
dally policy will not satisfy men who 
have put their money in on representa- 
tions made them. The Times has con- 
fidence in the men who constitute this 
company, and believes they mean to 
do all and more than they have inti- 
mated. 



Muoh ."jwceler. 

Hartford Times: "What is sweeter 
than to have a friend you can trust:" 
asked Sawkins. "To have a friend who 
will trust yo'i," replie«l Dawkins. 



The Weather Bulletin. 

Meteorological report received at 
Minn.. 8 a. lin. Jan l.\ t»t». 



Duluth 



PLACES. 


Bar. 
:».lo 


Ther. 


Wind 


Rain. 
T 


Weather 


Duluth 


— 8 


SW 


Cloudless 


Pt. Arthur.. 


:«l.(ti 





NW 




Cloudy 
Cloudless 


Winnipeg ..' 


-00 


NW 




St. Vincent. 


:«).liu 


-30 


W 




Cloudless 


Q'Appelle.. 
Asslnlb'ne . 


:io.31 


-2 








Helena 


Calm 




cioudiess 


Hunni.Dak 


:i(i.3H 


-U 


NW 


.01 


Cloudless 


St. Paul .... 


;«).20'— 8 


NW 


.M 


Cloudless 


La Crosse. . . 


;iu,iHi 4 


NW 


.04 


Cloudless 


Bismarck. . . 


■■M).-M 4 


W 




Cloudless 


Moorhead . . 


;w.'J»|-i» 


SW 




Cloudless 



T In rain column indicates trace. One (1) 
inch of rain or meltci snow equals ten (10) in- 
ches of snowfall. .Minus (—) In temperature 
column indicates l>elow xcro. 

W. H. FaliLon, 

Sera^ant Signal Corps 

Duluth. Jan. 20.— LocaZ forecast for 
hcenty-fotir hours, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
'Jl: Voider, fair weather 

Washington, Jan. ICt.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending s a. m. to- 
morrow: For Minnesota: Fair, .tta- 
tiomiry temperature in southeast, 
warmer in northwestern portions, 
westerly winds. For Xortli Dakota: 
Fair in eastern, local snows in ivestern 
portion, westerly winds; slight changes 
in temperature. For South Dakota: 
Fair; a slight rise in temperature; 
variable winds. 



6 PER CENT! 



We have at command unlimited 
amountsof money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Hade on Onimpfoved Propert). 



We've Notliing Against St. Paul. 

Exchange: Flights of o»tory, and 
classical pathos of St. Paul only reach 
the limit when some paper from, say 
Duluth hints that St. Paul is not hold- 
ing her own among Western cities. The 
St. Paul Journal of Commerce, in speak- 
ing of the rivalry of Duluth with St. 
Paul and Minneapolis says: Is it indis- 
pensable that St. Paul and Minneapolis 
must meet the fate of ancient Rrjme or 
Athens: that they must like modern 
Babylons fall beneath the wrath of high 
heaven, or like Carthage, there be not 
one stone left upon another to mark the 
spot whereon they had their growth':* 
•Assuredly, if one were to be influenced 
by the mouldings of the advocates of 
Duluth, it would seem as if the Zenith 
city will never reach its glory until St. 
Paul has ceased to be. 



Be Sure 

It you have made up y ui mi 1 to buy 
Hood's Sarsap.anll;i ■ u *b i.iduced to take 
any other. A IJoston :aay. h- e...u'ir!j is 
wortliy Imitation, ttlls i.v • p i,,.,ci. bc.ow: 

"In one store where I went i > buy Hood's 
8arsap.irina the clerk irted to ;.. Vice me buy 
tlieirovvnhiste.odof Hood'.s; !:• Mniotlielr's 
would last longer; that x mJgut take it on ten 

To Get 

days' trial; vhat If I did not like It I need not 
pay an>thlng, etc But ho could act prevail 
cm me to change. I told him I had taken 
Hood's Sarsaparllla, knew what It was, was . 
satlsfled with it, and did not w:mt .j.iy other. 
When I began takhig Hood's Sarsaparllla 
I was feeling real miserable with dyspepsia, 
and 80 weak that at times I could lumlly 

Hood's 

•tand. I looked like a person In oonmrnip. 
Hon. Hood's Sarsaparllla did mo so much 
SPoA that I wonder at niyscU sometimes, 
and my friends frequently speak of it." Mbs. 
Elu. a. Goff, 61 Terrace Street, Boston. 

Sarsaparllla 

BoldbjrandmKgtsta. ;pI;8ixfor j?.?. Prepared only 
kfCl. HOOD & CO., Apotlieenrlea, I i.w.:! . :.;:. J. 

100 Doses One DqI^.t, 



REAL ESTATE. 



LOANS 

MADE AT 

6, 7 AND 8 PER CENT. 



Money on Hand. 

NO DELAY. 



JONES & BRACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 

OFFEREO BV _ 

C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Stroet, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brool(- 
dale DIvUion 100,000 

640 Acres hear Old Superior 1 50 

1 Acres In the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 

C. E. RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 



» FAKGU880N BIi<X;K. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 



COFFIN & WARNER. 



W, C, SHERWOOD & CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 

LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE GENUINE BAROAINS IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlffti parts of the eity and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask Is for ].• rtlestoexamlneourllst and 

compare them f Ith other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood &. Co., 

J. d7& rTcTray; 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," HUNTER BLOCK. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTr. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTQAQE8 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



CUGUE i PRILE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 



B. 0. GRIDLEY. J. 0. MISHLKH 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Kdom 36, Bzcbanere Building. 
List your property with usat nhat It in worth 
and we will sell It. We Invite everybody to 
call In and see us. and solicit orrespondence 



M 



ONEY TO LOAN IN ALL 
sums on Duluth Real 
Estate at 6 1-2, 7 and 8 per 
cent. No delay. 

JULIUS D. HOV'ARD, 
Room 3, - - MiM«r Block. 



Hippy NEW m. 



The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well In Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All "Get There" If 

You Try, so You ha I 

Better Try 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



IChlcagtj Herald. J 
.lust now is iho lime when the average man 
HcKiiiR to prospuctlvely mentally plan. 
An the annual swciiring offseusoii draws near. 
Of the leaf he'll turn over tho Urst of the year 
Evciythiugthat Is wrong fi-oni his life he'll 

elfatv. 
And uHUifht that's unjust in his tlioughts have 

a place. 
He's sure he has power all evil to shun 
W hen he says so and so then the business is 

doiio. 
Hul, in order to have his new plan broken In 
He d bettor not tarry a day to begin. 
And tis iKJSt he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Whv not employ this year tlie leaf turned for 

last? 




<&ft nr\ ^^^ Set 

a>O.U W— of Teeth. 



OULLUM 



Painiets Dentist. 

Hocm 1-7, 406 West Superior Street. 
ffRrruaaon Block. Duluth 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The way to make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 

Your real(ty) friends, 

C. E. LOe 4 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 




AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



UB. GEO. B. HAYCOCK. 



Manager 



Two Nights of Meffiment 

MOIDAY AKD TOESDiY, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

r^irst appearance here of 

W. W. TILLOTSON'S 

Mefry Comedy Comp'y 

In the N?w York success of two seasons, 

ZIG ZAG. 



Presented ^rlth the original cast, headed by 
the cha'mlng soubrette. ANNA BOYD. 



Sale of sei ts Thursday, .Ian. 23. advance 

in prices. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 

DULUTH, - JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



This week, commencing JAN. 1 3, 
The Great Attraction. 

PRJISON LIFE 

—AMD — 

The Best llanetjShow intheHorthw.st 

ADMISSION: 

TEN (;[NTS ! m CEdTS ! 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY 

F. H. BARNARD. 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK 



N 



Room 10, 



F. HUGO & CO., 



teleph3ne%T''^^'" "''«^'^- 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER.loe Second St. East. 



mm, m sale, etc 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertiseniunts under this head received at 

i"*^ ^"','."" '"»f places, besides iu« business of- 
Bce ol 1 he Heraid : 

Kudioii I'hui-iiiaey. 127 Tenth avenue cast. 
Boyce X Tulman, txjruer Fourth avenue 
and bupenor street west. 
•J. >» . Nelsuu. No. isul, corner Eighteenth 

avouue wuot and superior sinxit. 

ojluih '""*"' '^^^''^^ *■''"*'' I'hilUps hotel. West 



Help Wiuited. 

WANTBB— A co<jk for a small family. 
«j"ire, 3JU liaot s>ocoud street. 



In 



w 

Apply 
street, 



AM hli— Competent girl for housework; 
one that can oook. Two in family, 
llrowu liroiners. IV West Superior 



w 
w 



.iNTEO— Bell boys wanted at Hotel 8t 
Louis. 



ANTED— A flrst-class German nurse girl. 
Addi-ess Koom 2vA Fir.si .National bank. 



IW IfcH to employ a lew ladies on salary to 
take i-narge of my ljusiues» at lUeir bomes. 
L.iKtil, very lascluatiug and iieallhlui. Wages 
»lu i>t-r wee». ttei«reucc givvn. Good pay lor 
part time. AUiiivss w uli tiamp, Mrs. Marion 
WalktT, Jjouisvaic-, K.y. 



THREE 



ACREAGE 



Bargains 



if taken at once. 



WAi«iXliI>— A girl lor general house work; 
limily ol ilu-ee. Call in lor*:noou, 411 
r»imli avenue ea&u 



^/-i/ \ feALAKif, **U expenses in advance, 
tPXjKJ allowed each month, ■^teady em- 
pioi meut at Uome or ti-avtuug. Ao solicluug. 
l>uiic-te <leliVLTLug ana uiukiiig ooileelious. J«o 
postal cards. Address witli stamp, Uafer & 
Co., f inua. Ohio. 



W.'.MKD-Pasiiy eo<jk, also other help, 
luijulre i'niUi|>s botel. 



WANTED— At the Womans Employment 
tJureau, »11 superior ciroel east, two 
second girls anu a uo^eu girls lor general 
house Work. Emiiluyiucut obtained tree of 
cost. Mia. A. I). Aycrs. 



For 8iUe. 



il^OIi SALE — A heavy working teaia cheap 
' at A. W. Eiier's Sui Lake avuuue souin. 



JJlOli SALE— House and lot ou East Fifth 
J sliccl, First uivi&lon. LoI:Via14u. $<iUUUou 
easy terms, :ill Fasiorei-Stens-ju nuilding. 



Jj^OU SALE— Thoroughbred (jedigreed Pug 
J pups. CaU at Acw Uodega, -jo West Su- 
perior street. 

1 ."^OB SALE— Lots 5 and « in block «, West 
X? End addition. West uuUnli. !MUUU tor the 
i«o. These arc bargains. Call ou Ericiisoa 
<k Strum, Fastoret-stcuaou buuuiug, room i^U. 

iT\Oli SALE— My r.jsiacuce with oO or 100 feet 
J at mil East cecouu street. Terms lo suit 
purchaser. E. A. Gilitcrl, -41 lioarU of Trade. 



i 



7\OU, SALE— Four lots in Fortland addition 



at *', oil each. :;ii l'asioici-!Mc .ton build- 
ing; aiho two lois un Ceuiral avuuut:.. West 
Liuluih. These will be sold at a big bargain. 
Call oil Ericksoii Jc Strom, room ~11. Fastorel- 
Stcnaun building. 



KEAVV HOUSES FOK SALE— 15 head of 
heavy horses, raised ui Lake Farjs, on 
the Northern Facittc road, 1 or sale by C. W. 
Uarvey. Can uc seen at llovsaru l>aru, ou the 
iake shore, Miuucsoia puiut. iiesiaeuue, ££i 
Wo»i Fourth street. 



"Ij^OK SALE— ~4'i acres ot pine laud on which 
XJ tli^re Is 2,iKni,UAj it>t.-t of pine, will be sold 
lorilNW. A snap lor someliody. Call at room 
'•til, Fasloret-Stcusou buiidtng. 



1.10U S ALE —Two lots un West Second street 
J witli house. Frice, iKJU,(.WO. Eilckson Si 
feiroui, room ;iij, FarBtoret-Stcuson building. 



Land situated near 




-THE— 



Greeitest Snaps 



LoHt. 

L'JST— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
shape of tnrec rings. L.ost in Superior 
or Duluili. Fluder will receive ix'ward by 
leaving the same at luy othc-e KolxTi G . Mc- 
lAiwcll, a:i. \\ est e»ui«.rior street. 



For iieut. 

FOR EENX- Desirable room; 
ste»ui,etc.; nrivate family. 
Herald othcc. 



bath, gas. 
Address S., 



w 



ANTED— A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L^. Taussig. No. i» Phoenix block. 



B 



Jioard and Kuoius. 

GAUD AND KCMJMS furnished at 730 West 
First street. 



FiuanclaL 

DULUTH MOUlXiAGIi UJAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount ou furui- 
tuit;, pianos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval from owners possession; also on ware- 
house iL-cc-ipt.-i. bank stocks, and any proi>eriy 
ot value; notes Uiacouutcu: partial payments 
received and jour own time granu-u tor pay- 
sjeut; no delay; money on hand and iurnish«5d 
immediately after security is approved. Wm. 
Horkau, Manager, Koom Li, Fargiisson block, 
Duluth, Minn. 



IF YOU WISH IVSELLOU UXSY DULUTH 
or Superior bank slock. cor|)oration or in- 
vestment sccurilies. call ou or aadress B. Mui^ 
phin, broker, U Hanniug block. Duluth. Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



In the market. 



ADDRESS 



T 



'■? 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



-Vr H. WILSON. ATrOKNEY AND CX>UN- 
.1^ • scUor at irtiw. Will pnictiiH? in State 
and Lni ted Slates Courts. AU business given 
prompt attention, 44 Fargusson lilock, Duluth, 
Minn. 

-pLASTEKlNG. 

U, T. DlNHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbinit 
promptly attended to. Olhce, room D Hun- 
ter block. 



"V|-»S. J. S. DINWOODIE, 

Treacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Slgiit Sloir- 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rot)ms at J. J. Wiggins's, ib East Su 
perior street, and at resldeuec, 121 Tteath ave. K 



jy-R. H. PARKK K HOB INSON. 
VOCAL INSTKUCTION, 
8 MILB8 BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN 6i 81'KBBms, ARCHITBCTB 
and superintendents. Office, rxjom Mo 
— , ttxchange building. 



/ 



PALMBK A HALL, 
SuperiDteadei 
lag, I>alutfa. Minn 



--_..„ ABCUITECTS AND 

inDt«adent8,room m, Bxctaauge buUd- 
..K w.__ E. 8. Palmer. L-lTHiil. 



1 



i 




/ 



I 



/. 







-a ! 




\ 




N 




DUIiUTH EVENTNG HEBALD JANTJABY 20 1890. 



SEABCH FOR mmi 



St. 



Paul's 


Search 


for 


Manu 


facturir 


ig of Nearly 


all 




Classes. 







Some Opinions and Sugges- 
tions of Interest to 
Duluth. 



The Fear of This City and 
Growth Voiced in Every 
Line. 



Its 



The Herald presents below extracts 
from the reviews and opinions of several 
of St. Pauls' leading citizens, on the sub 
ject of manu^dcturiug in that city. 
They are condensed from the Pioneer 
Press of yesterday. It is evident that 
this sudden desire for manufacturing 
institutions is tJie growth of a fear of 
Duluth, which ha-s done so remarkably 
in this line the past year. There are 
many kernels of importance and inter- 
est to this city in the nut the Pioneer 
Press hiis cracked. 

Governor William R. Merriam: There 
is too much tendency among the capi- 
talists of St. Paul to invest their money 
in securities: also in large buildings. 
However. I am not sorry that we have 
80 many large buildings. Wo have them, 
and now is the time to turn capital 
toward burtding up the city in another 
way. If we would not have the proprie- 
Uir's of these magniiicent buildings ko 
begging for tenants the city must be 
strennihened in its great point of weak- 
ness. We must ha\e factories. The 
field and the market are here, and there 
ifl only the question of fuel, or power, 
and labtjr to be considered, 
practical manufacturer and 



I am not a 
am there- 
fore not competent to dibcuss these ques- 
tions elaborately. But I can judge from 
results as well as anybody. The 
matter of the expense of fuel is said to 
be about the worst thing in our way. It 
is stated that it costs us iL'Jit per ton 
more for our coal for manufacturing 
than it dues the Duluth manufacturer, 
and that we cannot c«.>mpete with Du- 
luth in such kinds of manufacturing as 
those in which fuel is the great item — 
such as iron smelting. However the 
theorizer may settle this matter, certain 
it IS that the St. Paul foundry, an insti- 
tution which consuiues quantities of 
coal, is today finding' a lucrative market 
for its heaviest castings way down in 
Michigan and Ohio. This concern is 
paying one of the best per cents upon 
the capital invested in it of any other 
business in St. Paul. 

P. U. Kelly, of the wholesale grocery 
of P. H. Kelly i Co: '"I am satistied 
that we have got to a point where we 
must have lactones if we expect to grow 
as a citv, but I am not m possession of 
Buflicicnt knowledge to"^ judge of what 
character the factories should be. Our 
experience at Stillwater makes us con- 
servative and cauious about embarking 
in enterprises without knowing all about 
them and who conducts thorn. The suc- 
ceesofsuch ventures would nearly all 
depend upon honest and economical 
management. Cheap fuel is absolutely 
nec-essarv." 

James J. Hill, president of the Mani- 
toba railway: There is no question but 
St. Paul should have a great many more 
factories than are here now. But it 
would be detrimental to our interests to 
attempt or encourage the bringing here 
of some kinds of manufacturing. We 
are at the point now where it is a mat- 
ter of the utmost importance to attempt 
onlv such kinds of manufacturing as we 
can succeed in. It is hard to say how 
much harm the failure of some import- 
ant undertaking of the kind would do 
us. In estimating what kind of factories 
could succeed the question of fuel or 
power, labor and material must be care- 
fullv weighed. It would be folly, as a 
general rule, to attempt to manufacture 
something which requires great quan 
titles of bulky raw material which must 
be hauled a long way to us by railway, 
unless, perhaps, the manufactured arti- 
cle is proportionately as bulky as the 
raw material. It would generally be 
U5.ele88 to attempt anything in which 
coal entered as a great factor— such as 
iron smelting. And we would not 
be apt to succeed where certain 
kinds of skilled labor, or the 
verv cheapest of labor must be had. 
Sev'erai St. Paul capitalists have lost 
beavilv by taking stock in manufactur- 
ing. 'The hat has been passed around 
among them a number of times to raise 
funds to help some stranger to start a 
factorv . He generally had no money and 
offered nothing as against the capital 
but an assertion that he was an ex- 
periemed manufacturer. The capitalists 
never received any return either of 
protit or principal, and learned when it 
was too late either that the man who got 
his money was a mere adventurer. Now 
it seems to me that there is but one 
right way to handle this question and 
grow into a manufacturing city. We 
should have an organization among our 
best bi'siness men with the object of 
promoting the manufacturing industries. 
There should be one committee whose 
duty it should be to investigate and de- 
cide upon what kind of factories could 
be established here. There should be 
another committee to see that any im- 
portfint concern should get a location 
without paying ten prices for the real 

Col. E. F.Drake: I believe that a bin'- 
ing twine and cordage factory wouKi suc- 
ceed in St. Paul. This is the great in- 
dustry of Xenia. Ohio. A large factory 
of this kind in St. Paul would make a 
good market here- for the flax straw of 
the farmers of Minnesota. The Hax liber 
is what we want f'jr cordage. For bind- 
' ing twine of course we should have to 
have manilla. llien, too. binding twine 
requires somewhat expensive machinery. 
But what of thatr We have the market 
for the product, and what matter is it if 
the mach inery does cost money ? It does 
not require an army of skiUeti labor. All 
that is necessary is to employ as super- 
intendent a man who knows h(jw to 
operate the machinery to advantage. 
With a good business man as general 
manager of a factory properly equipped, 
the institution could not fail to become 
protitable. , , .. . j 

George L. Farwell: I believe hand 
agricultural implements could be made 
to advantage here of such things as hay 
forks, hoes and garden rakes vast quan- 
tities are used in the Northwest. These 
things wear out like clothing, and where 
there is an opening for a factory of that 
kind the market is never glutted. The 
plant would cost probably from ?15,000 
to fJ0,(XJO, and it would take from S-jO,- 
000 to *T5,tJU() for operating capital. This 
outlay would make an immense factory 
— one which could not fail of success. 
The market for the product would be 
west of us to the Pacific^ 

Among dry goods merchants there 
was one assertion that one of the great- 
est needs of St. Paul is a clothing fac- 
tory. Said one of these merchants 



of the Weet in our store on his way to 
Chicago. He tells us that we have 
evervthing he wants but ready- 
made clothing. He will have to go down 
to Chicago for that. Now Chicago has 
onlv live tirst-rank dry goods houses, 
while St. Paul has three. But Chicago 
has tifiy-two clothing houses, while St. 
Paul has but one. 

C. W. Hackett: Factories of the fol- 
lowing kinds would prove protitable. 
There is no reason I can find why a tub 
and pail factory would not do well. For 
rolling piiis. ' butter ladles, chopping 
bowls, step-ladders, snow shovels, exten- 
sion ladders, sawbucks, and all such 
things, could not fail. A brush factory 
would prove wonderfully profitable. We 
could make wire goods to advantage. 
We should make churs, washing ma- 
chines, neckyokes, whitttetrees, ox yokes 
and bows, and a multitude of like arti- 
cles. Then there are many iron goods 
that could be made here, such as horse- 
shoes, small castings, etc. We could 
manufacture willow goods. We could 
make wheelbarrows and handles. 

THE B EST K NOWN. 

Yeur 18"JO t<. be «>n».of the Mo*t Trosper- 
ous In Industrial History. 

Iron Trade Review: What of the fu- 
ture? It needs no Benner to predict 
that the first quarter of 18i)0 will be emi- 
nentlv satisfactory to all branches of the 
iron trade. Will the market stand the 
straia until the end of the year? A 
glance abroad may furnish some light. 
Beyond a doubt, an active market there 
means an independent market here. 
What is the situation in England today? 
High prices, equal to or higher than 
those in this country, with decreased 
sttjcks and increased production. Raw 
materials abroad are not only high in 
price, but the product for 1890 is con- 
tracted for which will make it impossi- 
ble to price the finished product at rates 
less than now. Of course, this means 
no foreign interference with our mar- 
kets and a correspondingly active de- 
mand at home. Add to this our own 
immense demand, our plentiful Western 
crops, and our rapid development of the 
immense iron deposits of the Northwest 
and the strong features of the situation 
are apparent. We believe 1890 will pass 
into history as one of the most prosper- 
ous years in our industrial history. 

.\l*though extensive inquiries for non- 
Bessemer ores continue to be received 
from furnace-men east of the Alle- 
ghanies, the sale of this class of ore 
dilfers widely from the rush with which 
the 1890 Bessemer product was snapped 
up. Nevertheless, it is a matter of 
record that, at least, 60 per cent of the 
anticipated non-Bessemer product has 
been disposed of, although in the case of 
several large dealers 80 per cent is nearer 
the figure. In other words, there has 
been sold in round figures, for 1890 de- 
livery, about 5,000,000 tons of Bessemer 
and father more than 2,400,000 tons of 
non-Bessemer, leaving but 1,600.000 to 
be Bt)ld out of an estimated product of 
the entire Liake Superior country, of 
9,000,000 tons of ore. 



TWO LIONS m. LOOSE 



Farmers in Illinois are Huntine: 
for Panthers and _ 
Lions. 



Great Depre lations 

by Them in Farm 
Stock. 



are Made 



SPORTING NOTES. 






QciNCY, 111., Jan. •20.— Farmers of Han- 
cock county, and many residing in the 
northern portion of .Vdams county have 
been terrified almost nightly by the 
screams of some wild beast. At first it 
was thought that a woman or child was 
in distress, and search was often made, 
but no one was found. 

A few mornings after the occurrence 
tme farmer residing near HanwKsk 
county line, found a cow and her calf 
Iving dead and their bodies mangled 
terribly. Bloody trails led from the 
barn to ^e pig pen of another farmer 
and her^several goats were found with 
their throats ripped open. The dis- 
covery aroused the farmers and it was 
the opinion of all that a panther or some 
other wild animal was in the neighbor- 
hood. Early the next day Abraham 
Johns went • to his barn and saw the 
straw moving, in an instant a huge ani- 
mal bounded out with a horrid scream 
and disappeared into the timber near by. 
The excitment now spread through the 
neighborhood and a band of men was or- 
ganized. A two days' search with dogs 
was made, but no trace of any animal 
could be found. 

The body of a tine horse was found 
yesterday in a jtasture a few miles above 
Quincy. The animal was not dead but 
its entrails had l)een torn out. People 
are thoroughly alarmed and many of 
them will not venture from their homes 
at night. A band of determined men is 
now being organized and has resolved to 
capture the beast at all hazards. 

There can be fittle doubt that <me or 
two panthers have there hiding in Ad- 
ams and Hancock counties for several 
yeara. There are some people who pro- 
fess to believe that animals are more 
dangerous than panthers are locwe. 
Some time ago a circus was traveling 
overland through Hancock county. 
While crossing the Crooked Creek coun- 
try, which is densely timbered, a cage 
containing lion and lioness in one apart 
ment, and two mountain panthers in an- 
other was upset by a swollen stream, 
and the animals escaped. It was said 
at the time that the lions were drowned, 
but it is now believed that they escaped 
and are causing the present alarm. 



Gastrick, the St. Louis oarsman, has 
given up sweep rowing and will turn his 
attention to sculling the coming season. 

Van Haltren will get a raise of ^WO 
from the Pittsbi rg club of the players' 
league. 

Bv realizing over 110,000 for Long, 
Hamilton and Stearns the clever presi- 
dent of the Kansas City club will get 
back some of the money he {)oured 
througn the base ball steve. 

Paddy Kerrigan will start tomorrow 
afternoon for San Francisco, wh re he is 
to meet Danny Needham in a fight to a 
finish the latter part of next month. In 
training he will probably be looked after 
by Pete McCoy. The men are to weigh 
140 pounds. 

A writer in the Chicago Times is con- 
fident that it will take more than an 
average of 20 to beat Frank Ives Jn the 
big New York tournament next month. 

W. E. Davis of Chicago has deposited 
goOO with the Breeder and Sportsman of 
San Francisco, as a forfeit for a match 
between his pacer Hoy Wilkes and Orrin 
Hickok's Adonis for §2500 a side. The 
winner to take the gate receipts also. 

One linndrod and twenty bears were 
killed in Arostook county, Me., last year. 
79 in Penobscot and .V2 in Washington. 

Jim O'Rourke yesterday asked for ten 
additional shares of the players' league 
stock. Director Talcott has informed 
him that there is none for sale. 
O'Rourke already holds ten shares. 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 



LIME— 



<^; 



Four lots on Eighth street near Third 
avenue east at a bargain. E. W. Markcll, 
ground fl(x>r Hotel St. Louis block. 



Notice the new bargains 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



offered in J. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



CREAM 



«y 



Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence rroven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
century. It is used by the United Slates Government. Endorsed by the heads of the 
Qceat Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthful. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 

■BIT YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO. 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



Tlnee Valuable and Nice-Lpg Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 





Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Pootk .t Co. 



WEST END. 



B 



To Build a Biif Barn: Ditttrulty in Blanllng 
Trenche«; Minor Notes. 

A prominent employe of the Duluth 
Street Railway company, states that the 
company will soon begin the erection of 
a larger barn to be built in the West 
End, or if the line should l>e lengthened, 
barns would Ije built at each end. 

Considerable difficulty is being had by 
the Gas and Water company in digging 
water trenches on Superior street. The 
street when graded was tiled with rocks 
and considerable blasting has had to be 
done so that the work is not .progressing 
as rapidly as was expected. 

Rev. .J. E. Lathrop of West Duluth, 
occupied the pulpit of Rev. E. S. Pilling 
at the Methodist church, the latter gen- 
tleman taking Rev. B. Mitchell's place 
in the First Methodist church. 

The ladies who took part in the skat- 
ing contest for the gold medal at the 
Parlor rink last Saturday night %vere 
Misses Lester, Kennebrook, Jurgenson 
and Mrs. Thos. Summers. The prize was 
awarded to Miss Maud Lester, whose 
skating was very fine indeed. At Twen- 
tieth avenue rink a masquerade was 
held. 

A man named Nelson and two others 
were out driving yesterday afternoon, 
when suddenly the horse ran away -and 
threw the cutter against a water pipe on 
(iarfield avenue. The cutter was over- 
turned and all were thrown out and one 
got his feet tangled up in the reins and 
was dragged half a block until the horse 
was stopped. Beyond a few bruises 
none of the men were hurt. 

Mrs. McKinnon will leave tomorrow 
for Washington, where she thinks the 
climate will improve her health. 

Birth. 

VkKAKLANE— To Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Mc" 
Farlane of Ifi FU'teenth avenue west, on Jan. 
l», a son. 

A Halt Without a Uouie. 

A railroad action at law, in which a 
million dollars is involved known as the 
Brown, Howard ic Co. suit, brought 
about by alleged crookedness in a con 
tract on the Duluth division of the Du- 
luth, South Shore & Atlantic, was 
stricken from the docket in the Mar- 
quette county circuit court and re- 
moved to Detroit. Judge Oartner of 
the circuit court of that district refuses 
to try the case on the ground that 
Wayne county has nothing to do with 
the case, no service being had on any of 
the litigants there. An attempt will 
be made to compel the case to be tried 
there, which, if unsuccessful will throw 
it back on Marquette county. The su- 
preme court will be called upon to de- 
cide the matter of location. It may 
possibly be brougntt here. 

He OvU $8000. 

Casaius M. Lounsberry who spent yes 
terday in the city, has just been disr 
charged from the Northern Pacific sani 
tarium at Brainerd. He was severely 
injured in the Crystal Springs 
railroad wreck last year while engaged 
as chief railway postal clerk. He 
had a claim for damages and 
had instituted suit, but was 
agreeably surprised to receive from the 
Northern Pacific a proposition offering 
him $8000. He received the money last 
week. Assistant Postal Clerk Evans, 
who was slightly injured in the same 
accident has settled his claim for iJ1;jOO. 



A GOOD WINTER. 



R 



O 



Lambermen Claim the Present tlie Best 
They Have Known. 

Duluth lumbermen are happy oyer 
the weather. It has been the best win- 
ter they have known for years and the 
log crop is going in with remarkable 
rapidity and economy. There may be, 
perhaps, a little more snow now than is 
wanted for hauling, but the difficulty is 
small, and is of little moment. 

There was a long period in the fall and 
early winter when the choppers and 
skidding teams were not- impeded by 
snow, and the work done in camps was 
something surprising. More logs were 
cut than ever before in the same time. 
Then the snow came, quite generally on 
a good bottom for sleighing, and there 
has been excellent hauling. More logs 
are banked today than usual, and haul- 
ing IS going on at a rapid rate. If the 
loggers get good water in the spring, 
there will be an unusually prosperous 
year to the local lumber trade, and a 
great impetus will be given it. 

INCREASIN G POP ULATION. 

Births and Deaths in the Past Month at 
Dulutli. 

The mortuary report for the month of 
Dcember shows the following: Births, 
58; males, "24; femalea ai. There were 
two pairs of twins. 

Deaths, 29; males, 10; females 13; 
cause of death— Bright's disease, 3; 
typhoid fever, 8; acute nephitis (palmon- 
arv trouble) 1; accident, 1; scarlet fever, 
1; capillary bronchitis, 2. Ages— under 
one year of age, U; one to five, 4; five to 
twenty, 2; twenty to forty, 12; forty to 
sixty, 2; unknown, 2. Social relation- 
married, 8; single 21; unknown, 2. Na- 
tivity—United States, IG; Sweden, 4; 
Germany, Canada, Poland, England. 
France, Scotland, Denmark, Finland, 
each 1. 

File .\rticles. 

The articles of incorporation of the 
Church of Christ, the Christian science 
denomination, were filed this morning. 
The incorporators are J. G. Owen, A. M. 
Morison, John W. Fee, John W. Davis 
and Robert Rankin. The directors and 
officers will be elected early in February. 



T 



H 



E 



R 



O 



W 



N 



FOR SALE: 

50-lMn Screaje, - -U 



49-15--ln Hcreaje, 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertj, - 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit( Transportation Freight and [xpress, 

DRAYS. 



Office, 17 First Avenue Weet. 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restauonis, 



-AND- 



«l? 



R 



S 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We are agents for tlio celcbraU'd 

Green Point Ctiina 



The Best in the World. 



Get our prices and vo" will be p<'>- 
fectly satistied . 



19 West Superior Street. 



Lots for sale as 
as $25 each. 



lONA^ 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 



17 First Avenue West. 



SCHILLIIIG'S OBCHESTfiH 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 

ROOM 4U PASIORET-SimOU BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - - MINN. 




L BE SOLD VERY CHEUP -:- 



-ALSO- 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



Nowly refitted, 
room In town. Livery in 



First class in everyway. 
Finest sample room in 
eoimection. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop 



Tlires Good Building Lots on Ninth Street, 




Near Third avenue east 



Open November 



Certificate of Amenileii 



ARTICLES OF IHCORPORAIiOH 



OF LAKESIDE LAND COMPANY. 




sa. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strict!) First-Class in all Jppointmenis. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



STATE OK .MINNESOTA, I 
CoL'.NTY OF St. Louis, f 

KNOW ALL MEN BV THESE PItESENTS. 
That we. Ozora P. SteHrus, president, 
iind Win. C Sartreut, seeretary, of Lakesuli.' 
Land eonipany, a eorporatlon orgranized and 
doing business under the laws of Minnesota, 
bt'iujfduly "nd seveniUy sworn, do hereby eei- 
tlfy and deiH).-* that at a regular luwtinjrul 
the shareholders of the said Laltesi<le Laud 
i-onipttiiv. duly called and held at the otlicesof 
said eon'ipanv at Dulutli, Minnesota, on the 
fourth dav of January, IWW. at two o'clixk m 
the afternoon of said day, the articles of Ineor- 
iKjrationof said corporation wore amended so 
as .o increase the eapital stoeli of said corpor- 
ation train one humii-ed an.l twenty-five thou- 
sand dollars, to five hundred tliousand dol- 
lars and so 03 to iuerease the nunit)er 
(d shares iu the eapital stock of said corpor- 
ation from twelve hundred and fifty to five 
tho.isand. by ainendimr Article 3 id said 
orijfinal articles of incorporation, which fixes 
the amount of the eai>ital stock ol said cor- 
poration at one humlnsd and tweuly-fivo thou- 
sand d' .liars, so as to read as follows, to-wit: 

AUTICLE 3. 

'•The amount of the eapital stock of the cor- 
poration shall lie five huiidre<i thousand dol- 
lars, i*.'>tt(t,tKiU.OO); to be paid iuon call ol the 
lH)anl of direcior'^." , ,, , , , 

AtXil by ameudiiiK .\rticle 7 of sala orltrinal 
arlietes of incorporation, wliieli fi.xes the niiiu- 
ber of shares in the capital stock of said cor- 
porpation at twelve hundred and fifty, so as 
to read as follows, lo-wit: 

AUTICLE 7. 

"The number of shares in the capital stock 
of the eoriMiration shall be five tliousand (fi.tiOO), 
each of the par value of one hundred dollars 
itUKi IKI). which shares when tuUy paid up 
shall be nou-assessuble." 

That there were pri'sont at said meetiOK, 
who voted In favor of said atnendiuents a 
niujority in nuuiljcr of the shareliolders pt 
said corporation, who held a majority In 
amount ot the sliai-es of stock of the same. 

OzoKt P. Stear.vS. 
Wm. C. Sakubst. President. 

Secretary. 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
(3ood schools and graded streets close by. 



r- 



A LOT 



-IN 



Apply by letter or in'person to 



BLOCK 12, 




L 



" E D ," 




c^f^iEsiB :E5:Ei:Ee-^^i_.i3. 



A Keal Spook. 

A special to one of our leading daily 
papers from Cochrane, Wis., says: "For 
several years the existence of a ghost 
has been reported here. Last Friday a 
party was organized to investigate. Ar- 
riving at the ghost's walk, we saw an 
object about 10 feet high and or 7 
inches in diameter. It slowly advanced 
to within a rod of the most daring. 
Some ot the party fled, but those who 
remained saw it suddenly disappear." 
No European family of ancient lineage 
and blood, with any pretentions to note, 
is without a veritable and well-authen- 
ticated ghost. "The Burlington" is 
away ahf ad of any of its competitors in 
this respect, as well as in those of fast 
time, smoothness of track, and elegance 
of equipment This is recognized by the 
traveling public generally, and allowed 
by all who patronize the line. For tick- 
ets, time tables, rates, and any informa- 
tion, address agents of "The Burling- 
ton" or connecting lines, or write to W. 
J. C. Kenyon, general passenger agent 
Chicago, Burlington & Northern railroad, 
St. Paul, Minn. 



Desk room for rent cheap. Apply to 
A. M. Gritlin & Cx)., First National bank 
building. 

Large and complete list of Er.dion lots 
for sale by E. W. Markell, Hotel St. Louis 
block, ground floor. 

Danein); and Deportwient. 
Prof. James S. Moon will unroll new 
names for his second teim at No. 11^ 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

Uoeit Experi'fiice Count? 

It does, in every line of business, and 
especially in compounding and preparing 
medicines. This is illustrated in the 
great superiority of Hood's Sarsaparilla 
over other preparations, as shown by the 
remarkable cures it has accomplished. 

The head of the Arm of C. L Hood & 
Co. IS a thoroughly competent and ex- 
perienced pharmacist, having devoted 
his whole life to the study and actual 
preparation of medicines. He is also a 
member of the Massachusetts and Am- 
erican Pharmaceutical associations, and 
continues actively devoted to supervis- 
ing the preparation of and managing 
the business connected with Hood's 
Sarsaparilla. 

Hence the superiority and peculiar 
merit of Hood's Sarsaparilla is built 
upon the most substantial foundation. 
In its preparation there is represented 
all the knowledge which modern research 
in medical science has developed, com- 



CHRIST IAN SC IENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table Is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the siclc. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



MICHIGAN STREET, 



Great French remedy. Dr. LeDuc'9 pi R- 
IODIC *L iTi^LS, from Paris, iVanoe, actonly ou 
the Kcnerativo orifans in females and p<>si 
lively cures suppresslonof menses (from what- 
ever cause), and all pericKlical troubles \>cc\i- 
liar to women. A safe, relialile remedy, * ir- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money r«^- 
funded. Should not be used during preRnan.y 
The larire pro{)ortlon of the ills to which lad;es 
aresubject is the direct result of a disordered 
and Irrejrular menstruation. Kobt. Su-veitfoii 
4 Co., ('hicaifo. III., H. Boswarth & Co.. -Mil- 
waukee. Wholesale Agts. The genuine only 
supplied by Boyce & Totman, Solo Agts.. !'u- 
luth 



Subscribed aud sworn to before me this "tli 
day of January, 1S<00. W . K- Pf "»*v, 

Notary Public. 
St. Louis county. Minnesota. 
Notarial Seal, 
St. touisCo., Minn. 



FOR SALE 



OFFICK OF RKGI.STEB OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, Ug 
County ok St, Louis. I 
I hereby certify that the wiihin articles were 
tiled in this ottice for record on the Sth day ol 
.lanuary, A. U. IsiHI, at 3:10 o'clock n.m, and 
was duly recorded In Book G of Miscellaneous 

'"'*^*' ■ Amos Sheph.^ku. 

lleglsterof Deeds. 



-AT- 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT. 

Booms 510. 511 and 512, Oulutti Onion National Bank Builiiinj. 



*- 



^■ 



I 



DuLCWESii 

NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMEM 

Spcriflp for Hystrrid, Iliiziness.Fits. KeumlL'io. V. hr 
iuliiu>s, Mental D<prt'»8ion, K<iftenin(r of tlir r.iai >• 
.nltini; 111 insanity and Iradlnir to mii-riy <!<■• ii> .n 
afitli. Pr.-maiure "t)l<l Age, Buirenni.-c . !."•* ol !■ . 
in culler sen. Involi.ntary Losses, ami SpeiiiiKt.n r ,., ,-; 
laiiseJ tiv oviTHixertion of the b-nin. xcif-anu- ,> 
jver-tndul^noe- Kiwh iKtx contain- otie month's \ ri'a:- 
ment. tl a lioi. nr kIz for $i, sent liy mail prep i 1 
With eiu-h order for sir Ikixi-s, nil! send pun 1. 1- ■ 
^inrantfo to nfiind moni'V if tlio Ireatnicnl fail.-, w 
>.urt'. Uuarantee^ isaut-d and gentunc cold only by 

Boyee & Totman. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 
Minn. 



ST.A^TE OF MINNESOTA, ». 

Depautmkst okSt.\te. i ,, , , 

I heifby eertifv that the within instrume^ii t 

was Uled for record in this office on the llth 

dayof Januarv A. D. 1«K). at !to clock a. 

HI., and was duly recorded In book \ of incor- 



Below Mi Pfice 



porations ou pajre iT'). 



H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 



Jan. 13,14, 15,16. 17,18.30. 



NEW HOTEL. 



bined with long experientje, brain-work 
and experiment. It is only necessary to 
give this medicine a fair trial to realize 
its great curative value. 

Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record Ixxjk can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 

$583.33 

Will handle one of Thomas & Hondrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill. A rare bargain. 
L. J. TAuasiG, 

Phasnix block. 




If you want to build in 

"Every day or »j there is some merchant suit J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Endion con- 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



GREAT ENGLlSa REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 

T«<1«. BBfk. A guarantei cure for all ner 
""^^'^ vous disease such as Weak 
Memory. I..OSS Brain Power. 

Hysteria. Headache, Pain In the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhoea, Cnlversal Lassi- 
tude. Seminal Weaknosa. Impo- 
tency and ireneral loss of power 
of the Utnerative Organs:-Ji< 
either BCA, eftused liy indisru- 
ftahnTiUM» tlon or overexertion, ami which 
ultimately lead to Premature Trade KwX. 
^Id Akc insanity and Consump- 
tion ll.tJO or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mail on re- 
ceipt of.'prlce. Full partlcalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We Oaarantee Six 
Boxes U) cure any case, tor 
every 16.00 order received, we 

send six boxes, with a written 

giiarantoeto refund the mouey|^f^^f f ^|(|b^. 
If our Specific does not effect a cure. Address 
•U communications to the sole irianiifacturers 
THB MUHKAr MEmclNRCO. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Dold in Uolntta bjr M»> Wlrth. 



-THE- 



m 




40 




40 



-AT- 



P. V. DWYER & BROS. 

Telephone 179. 
207 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



If taken at once. 



Lot sold next 
property for $335. 



this 



St. Paul, Minn., 

4tli and WawhinRton Sin. 



Cor 

On (able Car Line. Itest Table 
wesL llaies »3.00 and I p;yard!^ 



ill tlie NoiUi 



W U. Babmes. Manager. 




Mortgages Negotiatei 



6 AND 7 \-SR CENT. 



Lowest 
security, 
quire of 



rates for 
Before 



all sizes and grades 
borrowing elsewhere 



of 
In- 



N. J.UPHAM, 

Onder First Nat. Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUll DING. 



FlllE INSURANCE. 



Address 



L.S., 



PostofTice Box A A. 




R. KROJANKER, 



Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh 



Robes and Mats. 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. «®- Good worknn ± ^- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



^1 



209 East Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DIILOTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATIOB. 



American Exchange Bank 
Be I &. Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Se:urity Bank 
State Bank of 
National Bank 
Msirine Bank 



of Duluth 

Duluth 

of Commerce 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
250,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

I 0.000 

i 00,000 

26,000 



5 



I 



-*< —.,,- 



-***- 



j. « ■■• ." 



^ ' . i. ' »j I 




4A*'W '»'^, 



I 




yUJLUTH BVENTNTG HEBAIiD: JAKUARY 20, 1890. 



Prices on the Duluth Board; 

the Visible Supply 

Figures. 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



Wheat weakened a S additional to- 
day. At the oi)ening prices were i^ be- 
low Saturday's close, firmed up hi weak- 
ened jiyain in a few minutes, and before 
the close was V^c under the oi)enin^'. 
The visible supply report, which showed 
a fair decrease, had no effect in checking 
the weakness, which was general in all 
marketa There were sellers here all 
day. 

Cash wheat remained firm all day in 
the face of the decline in May. No. 1 
hard, freah. sold at "SK^, while for f. o. b. 
sold at 80»2. At the close^ it 
was at 784 nominal for regular. No. 1 
northern regular closed at 76 nominal, 
and No. 2 northern at 73 nominal. Janu- 
ary closed at 78*^ nominal for No. 1 hard 
anil 7<J for No. 1 northern. May opened 
at 83 '8 . sold up to 84, weakened, selling 
down to SCJij. iintl closed at SJi^ sellers. 
May No. 1 northern sold early at 81' ^g. 
weakened and closed at SO^^ nominal. 

The Uailv MoTeiuent. 

Cars on track here: Wheat 9, corn 24, 
oats .{. Receipts: Wheat 5(31 bu., corn 
2328 bu. Shipments: Wheat 1073 bu. 
Minneapolis reported 201 cars on track, 
against 127 Saturday and 428 last Mon- 
day. Keceipta there were lt)8,780 bu. 
Shipments: Wheat, 1(5,820 bu; flour, 17-, 
890 bbls. Chicago reported on track 70 
cars of wheat, 1^ of corn, 118 of oats, 
25 of rje and 71 of barley. 

The Visible Supply. 

Acojrding to the Chicago report the 
visible supply of wheat shows a dei-rease 
for the past week of (5t)0,(X)0 bu, corn an 
increase of ;l(32,000 bu and oats an in- 
crease of lOVW bu. A year ago the de- 
crease of wheat was 889,348 bu. The 
total visible supply of wheat is now 32,- 
518,000 bu against 3(3,599,029 bu a year 
ago; corn, 11,195,(X)0 bu; oats, 5,077,lX)0 
bu. 

Chicaso Ootuiip. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler Jc Lewis; 

Wheat active, weak and lower. The 
sudden change in temperature made the 
scalpers tiuite bullish and they bought 
freely at the opening. Hutchinson and 
the N'orlhweet being good sellers. The 
expectation was that the large decrease 
in visible supply would bring outside 
buyicg orders, but when it failed to do 
so door traders unloaded freely and » 
quick break of fg cent resulted. There 
was no news of importance from the 
outside. The close is very weak with 
indications of a lower market tomorrow. 

Provisions, receipts of hogs were 
lighter than estimated and the provision 
market opened quite active and higher 
with good buying. On call, there were 
indications of free selling by houses who 
have been long for New York account, 
which continued uotU nearly the close 
of trade. 

New York Stocks. 
The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported bv 
W. W. Bili&Co.: 

Today. 

Chicago. Burlington Se Qulncy. lOtSVi 

Aaieri(.-an Cotton Oil 2«i^ 

MUsiOuri PaciUc VS\ 

Northern Paciflc preferred 73-5 

Chlcaijfo. .Milwaukee & St. Paul.. a»\ 

Suirar Trust 53H 

Gas Trust M 

Louisville i Nashville StU 

Chicago i Northwestern 1MH4 

Kock Island \)b% 

Lake Shore ,„ VHfj 

ReaUinir X9i 

Tena. coal and IroB 86 

Richmond Terminal 21 

Atchison 31 

Delaware & Lackawaima 138 

New Ene'land 45?i 

LeadTrust aoi^ 

Western i nion.... 84>^ 

Union Paciflc 06% 

Wlsconsia Ceatral 84^ 

OU mil 

Weekly Statement. 

Showing the stock of grain in store at 
Duluth (by grades) for the week ended 
Saturday, Jan. 18, 1890: 

„ , ^ _. Bushels 

No.lhard 2.aB,a»E.' 

No. 1 northern LWI.tBl 

No. 3 northern ... . 41I6.4.V. 

No. 1 red winter 51,; 

No. 2 red winter nu; 

No. 3 spring' wheat 216.44!' 

No^rade 7,4^1; 

Rejected and condenmed l.'itJii 

Special bin 63,7o<* 



promptness and without fear or favor. 
Come forward and nominate Mr. Pear- 
son, ior if nominated he will be sure to 
be elected. Yours truly. Voter. 

Court Notes. 

At this mornings' session before Judge 
Stearns, the jury in the case of August 
F. Diedrich vs. County commissioners, 
found for the defendant. Thomas Tim- 
lin vs. Duluth, and Eliot Lord vs. same, 
both damage suits, the defenant was 
allowed to amend his answer. The 
larceny case of the state vs. Gisch for 
alleged grand larceny was taken up. 
The jur>- returned a verdict of not guilty. 
The case of Robert et al. vs. L' Union 
St. Jean Baptiste was dismissed on mo 
tion of the plaintiff. In the Porter 
Steam Heating company vs. T. Bailey, 
the action was set for trial Jan. 23. 
Lottie E. Hicken vs. City, was set for 
Jan. 29. Robert F. Wilson and David A. 
Thatcher vs. Hazeu Stevens stricken 
from calendar. Hubbard & Vincent vs. 
Mary Vail will be tried tomorrow. Lena 
Wise vs. .\ndrew Wise was set tor Feb. 3. 
Moses Stewart Jr., was appointed re- 
ceiver of the Erickson stock. N. H. 
Wilson was admitted to practice. His 
ciedentials were from the supreme court 
of New Hamshire. 



The Lower Court. 

At the police court this morning James 
Largey paid Jgo for being drunk and $:3 
for being disorderly in the hack which 
conveyed him to the station. Frank 
Wright was sent up for ten and Thos. 
Smith for seven days. Drunkenness 
the charge. Daniel Gallagher and Thos_. 
Moore, two plain drunks each paid a ^ 
fine. Geo. Bush paid a tine of 18.44 for 
being drunk and was tinetl $5 additional 
for fast driving while in this condition. 
P. J. Krupp,on complaint of Jas. Drohan. 
was arraigned on the charge of assault. 
Krupp plead not guilty and is out on 
bail of $25 for appearance tomorrow. 
There were live cases of unlawful de- 
tainer tried this afternoon, the parties in 
interest being, M. Heisler against Thos. 
Brett; Weston Land association against 
John Evans; C. A. Beattie vs. J. B. 
Williams, and E. J. Hoppraan vs. Hately 
Fitzsimmons. 



Unwisely But Well. 

Miss Mary Martinson of 729 East Fifth 
street became a mother yesterday morn- 
ing. Although her condition was plainly 
discernable to the people of the house, 
she strenuously denied the truth until 
two hours before her confinement. Mary 
is a buxom Norwegian damsel of twenty 
winters and came to Duluth about a 
year ago. She was employed in a laun- 
dry. She was foUowedto tbia country 
by the young man who seduced her 
and who is the father of her t)oy. 

The Duluth Lyceum. 

The second meeting of the proposed 
Duluth Lyceum for the purpose of de- 
bates, essays and with a view to organ- 
ize a lil)rary in the near future, will be 
held within the Bethel rooms on Mon- 
day evening at 8 o'clock. The minutes 
of the previous meeting will be read and 
the committee will report. All inter- 
ested are invited to attend. The meet- 
ing is open to all. A special invitation 
is given to the young men of the city for 
whose benefit this is being organized. 

Captured n Kunner. 

Chief of police Doran received a tele- 
gram from the chief of police at St. 
Paul to arrest Robert McNabb, alias 
Carl MuUer, alias Ed Mann. Detective 
Benson soon found his man. When ar 
rested he admitted that he was running 
away from home. He is sixteen years 
old. and registered at The Spaulding 
under the name of Ed Mann. He will 
be kept in custody until further instruc- 
tions are received. 



Some News of General Interest 

to West Duluth 

People. 



Personal and Other Matters of 

a Bustling Young 

City. 



Satur- 
day. 
IW, 

■^U 

t»?» 
63% 
45 

mu. 

lOtfS 
96\ 

104S 
3BS 
S6?i 
21 
3US 

135 >8 

84 

m» 

33\ 
105 



On Temperance. 

P. A. Burdick delivered a powerful 
lecture on temperance at Temple Opera 
last evening before an audience that 
tilled every seat. The address was 
listened to with deep attention, and will 
probably be the means of awakening a 
new interest in this important social 
question. He continues during the 
week. 



Around the World. 



Total 4,390.3&>« 

Afloat In the hartwr 73,0Oi 

Total 

Increase for the week 

In store a year ago 

Increase a year ago 

Corn in store 

Increase forthe week 

Data in store ... 

Increase for the week 

Wheat in store at Minneapolis.. 

Wheat in store at St Paul 

Increase wheat at Minneapolis . 
Increase wheat at St. Paul. . 
Com in store at Minneapolis. . . 
Gate in store at Mlnni-apoli* . . , 



. i.4«3.35.x 

2,36fi 

. L163.S2.' 

377,«<'i7 

7,:b.' 

:{7.'.«(i 

. 7.«»;,'.»-:i 

345,00) 

74.7r!< 

jnchang'ij 

239, laj 

90,-«5 



M ioneapolia Cloae. 

MnrxEAPOLia, Jiut. 30.— Cl'islnjr quotations: 
tiO. 1 bard, Januaiy. 79; February, 7',<- 
May, SZ; on track, 79'i. No I northern. 
January. 765i: February, 76^*; May. 7<JJi; on 
track,4g7^4. No. 2 northern. January, 74; 
rebruar}-. 74; May. 7S; on track. 74(a7e. 

New York Vlsit>Ie. 
New York, Jan. 20.— Produce exchanjce 
statement of visible H<i|iply: Wheat, 3SM0,(in 

bu; <i. ru. ll.il.-.,wr bu; in- 

creas* ;•'>« bu; increa.-^?. 114,- 

9"''; r\ • rease. 4».63tt; barley, 

2,lt<U.Uca«bu; tievreade. M.2U&. 



Chicago Close. 
CHICAGO, Jan. 20, 1:15 p.m. 
lower. January', 76; May, 8OJ4. 
January. '£»%,; May, .ilh- 



close.— Wheat 
Com, steady: 



Sanae Here. 

MohBon County Democrat: A so- 
ciety has been organized in Royalton to 
subdue baahfulnese. That society 
should admit several residents of that 
place who are too bashful to call and pay 
for their nswspapers. 

Propoites a Name. 

To the Editor of the Herald: 

The citizens of Duluth are discussing 
the merits of various people who they 
think ought to be elected as mayor in 
place of Hon. John B. Sutphin, whose 
term is about to e.xpire. Among others 
the name of H. W. Pearson has been 
often and favorably mentioned by many 
of both political parties as a man whom 
no one could object to, and who, if 
elected, would fill the position with 
credit to the city and Siitisfaction ta the 
people. Mr. Pearson is alxiut 35, 
in good health, well educated, full 
of energy, gootl habits and with a 
character and reputation for honesty 
and ability second to no one. He is an 
old resident and has served a number of 
years on the school board and fire de- 
partment, always taking an active part, 
and is thoroughly posted upon the finan- 
cial and business condition and needs of 
the city. The people ( ould depend that 
the laws would be administered with 



There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
e.xisted then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we tiave ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 25,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way— by the ditticulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 miles 
in a single line? How much money they 
would c"ost'' How many great cities anil 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestiga*«. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of c<jnnecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenvon, Gen. Pass. Agent C., 
B. & N. R R.,St. Paul, Minn. 



Waked up Effectually. 

A lethargic, dormant condititon of the 
liver is hardly to be overcome with dras- 
tic cathartics and nauseous cholagogues. 
A gentler, pleasanter'and far more effect- 
ive means exists of arousing the organs 
when somnolent. This is Hostetter's 
Stomach Bitters, vouched for by the 
medical fraternity, tested by tlie public 
for many years. A resumption by the 
biliary organ of its secretive function, 
with the activity attendant upon health, 
a return to regularity of the bowels, and 
a renewal of digestion, are the no less 
happy and certain results of using the 
Bitters systematically. Its laxative 
effect is never painful and drenching, its 
tendency being rather to perpetuate 
regularity than to produce a copious 
attion. Malaria, nervousness, debilitv, 
kidney troubles and neuralgia it sub- 
dues effectually. 

Lots 14G and 148. block 4.3, Third divi- 
sion, a choice corner of 100x150 feet, for 
sale by E.W.Markell, ground floor Hotel 
St. Louis block. 



In another column will be found the 
details of an interesting contest in which 
every West Duluthian is interested. It 
is a guessing contest on population on 
West Duluth, Duluth. and the Hast End 
suburbs, and there's no reason why some 
West Duluth person shouldn't win the 
iJoO, just as West Duluth itself is a big 
factor in the population. 

James McRea, foreman of the black- 
smith shop at the Iron Bay works, who 
arrived a few days ago, is a man of 
marked characteristics and soon becomes 
well known wherever he goes. His 
little eccentricities have earned for him 
the title of "Uncle Josh," a name which 
will probably stick to him as long as he 
remains in the place. He is a big-heart- 
ed, whole-souled Scotchman, and al- 
though over seventy years old appears 
as fresh, vigorous and full of life as 
many a man of thirty. He has been in 
the employ of the Iron Bay company for 
twenty-two years, and during that time 
has lost service a day on account of sick- 
ness. He is entirely impervious to the 
grip or any of the diseases tliat common 
flesh is heir to. He says "that in a 
very short time he will have fifteen tires 
going in the blacksmith shop." which 
means a force of over thirty men in that 
department alone. "Uncle McKea." as 
he is called by his old friends, dearly 
loves a good story, and told one on Pres 
ident Merritt the other day which the 
boys thought gootl enough to bring down 
a full house. He said that "Dan," as he 
familiarly termed the President, "was 
making a speech at a Melhodi.-<t meeting 
at one time, and in the midst of it solilo- 
quizing remarked, "upon whom does Dan 
Merritt depend?" One little b<jy in the 
gallery tooH it upon himself to answer 
the question, and shouted at the top of 
his voice, "old Uncle McRea." 

L. B. Mo«>re has rented the Forest 
Home on Second avenue west, and will 
retit it to accommodate sixtv boarders. 

H. H. Browne and W. S. "G. Sharp & 
Co. have changed their place of business 
from the Manufacturer's bank block to 
the Biiiall building near the West Duluth 
depot. 

The village council will hold an ad- 
journed meeting Thursday evening. 

Four more employes of the Iron Bay 
works arrived from Marquette yester- 
day. 

S. Moles, who has had a hard tussel 
with the grip, is slowly recovering. 

Capt. Hurst's building on Central 
avenue, has been rented to a Mr. Edison 
of southern Minnesota, for a grtxjery 
store. 

J. A. Skinner arrive<l home Sunday 
morning from an extended visit to 
Niagra Falls. On his return he was at- 
tacked by the grip, and was obliged to 
lay over at Toronto). 

F'. E. Gross, late superintendent of the 
Car Works Rolling mill, left today for 
Chiciigo and Eastern points. 

George Watts hae resigned as time 
keei)er at the Car works. He expects to 
take up his old business of civil engineer- 
ing. 

C. M. Thomas is moving his family 
today into a house he has secured on 
First avenue east. 

E. E. BurlSy expects to leave for a 
a short business trip to Taylors Falls. 

Rev. J. E. Lathrop, of the Methodist 
church exchanged pulpits yesterday, 
with Rev. E. S. Pilling of Grace 
church. 

The Bible society meets tonight at the 
Presbyterian church. 

Daniel O'Conner, Minneapolis, is stop- 
ping at the Phillips. 

Rev. Mrs. Brant is recovering from an 
attack of the grip. 

The Society of Christian Endeavor 
will hold a business meeting Wednesday 
night at the Presbyterian church. 

Professor Stamm's dancing class will 
hereafter meet two evenings each week, 
Tuesdays and Fridays. On Friday 
evening next the professor wdl give the 
first of a series of socials, two hours fol- 
lowing the regular class lesson. 

Quarterly conference was held at the 
Methodist church yesterday. Rev. 
Forbes of St. Paul, the presiding elder 
was present and officiated at the special 
services. 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. M.\CFAKL.\>E & AtSTl.N. 




Notice the new bargains offered in J. 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



'I'^WO RCKJMs. heated and lighted, with 
i. board. In a private family. »4.tO per week. 
14 Fourth avemie east. 



w 



ASHEHWO.M.\N Wanted — Apply 21 
Maryland a%'enue. 



QALE OF Fi:KNITT:RE-Mr. E T. FlUey 
O i>einjf about to leave the city, will offer at 
private i^ale. al his residence. No. t<24 East 
.Second stret^t, u(>on Saturday, Jan. 25111, frota 
10 a. tn to 5 p. m., all his household furniture, 
carpets, kltcneu utenails, etc., etc. 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



-A»D— 



INSURANCE. 

Rooms I, 2, Exchange Qldg. 
DULUTH, - . MINN. 



POWDER 

Absolutely Pure. 

This powder never vanes A marvel of pur- 
ity, strength and wholesomeness. More eco- 
nomical than the ordinary kinds, and 
cannot be sold In compelltioii with the multi- 
tude of low tost, short weight, alum or phos- 
phate powders. Sold only In <.an.s. Koyal 
Bar I NO PowDFR Co.. 108 Wall utreot. N V 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Snperior Brewery 

Is the largest in the dtate 3f Mlc tesots ou mde 
of the Twli Cltlei 



THIS -DAY 

We start to mark all 

WINTER GOODS AND NECKWEAR 

At a Price that must sell the same. 



MONDAY, JAN. 27 

Will begin to sell THE VERY BEST FINE HATS 
AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS at the very lowest 
Drices. 

KILGORE & SIEWERT, 



Store closes at 6:80 P. M. 



St. Louis Hotel Block. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 




Notice to Contiactofs. 



Sealed proposals will be rweived until 2 
o'clock p. m., January aith. isixi, by E. K. Jef- 
ferson, chiiiruian of coniruittee on" court house 
and county jail, for the cell work In the new 
county Jail, in accordance with plans, spt-cifl- 
catlons drawn by O. O. Trapliageu. architect, 
on file at the office of the county auditor. 

Bidders will specify what (juality and 
strength of chraiue steel they pro|M>se to use 
and submit sample of same. They will also 
submit drawings or samples of Uxks and bars 
they propose to urto, and all mechanical de- 
vices connected with the cells. 

Each pn)p<wal must Ih' accompanied with a 
chock for live hundred dollars to be forfeited 
to St. Louis county, in the event that the pro- 
posal which said check fcccompanies shtll be 
accepted by the county commissioners, and 
that the person making the proposal shall fail 
to comply with its terms 

Address all tirr)|)osals to E. K. Jeffersfjn, In 
care of county auditor, Duluth, Minn. For 
further information apply to 

JOHW F. ."^CHI.KU.NBS, 

Superintendent, Duluth, Minn. 
The commls.sioiiers reserve the right to re- 
ject any and all pnjpoaals 
Doc 14-18-21-a4-avJan 1-4-8-11-15-18-23. 



^ W .■ ■ ^ 1 ^' ^ 



This beautiful property lies just above Oneota, and is about three-quarters 
of a mile from Short Line depot. It is platted topographically; large sized 
lots, 33x125 feet; the view from it splendid; the prices are low, and the 
terms are the very best. So situated that all city improvements must enhance 
its values. 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



& 



WEST DULUTH. 



DULUTH 



REALTy SNAPS! 



NO SUCH 



BARGAINS 



Are to be found among 



uluth Real [stale Men 




4^^ 




M 




o 
o 

of 

UJ 

o 

a: 
O 

O 

h 

CO 

I- 
z 
< 



GREIIT SOIFICE SALE 




r 



Will contin 
duced. Co 
MUST R 
Our low- 
unqualified 
of our Busii 
us to quote 
you would 
a few to ofi^ 

$7.49 bu 
worth at le; 

$9.47 bt 
worth at le; 

The san 
Suits, Boys 
Furnishing 
our stock a 
dollars.) M 
and compel 
our prices 



ue Fifteen Days— until stock is re- 
st or worth cuts no figure. WE 
EDUCE, even at a great loss. 
prices have caused us to meet with 
success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
less Existence." Space will not allow 
prices on our entire stock; besides, 
not stop to read them, but will quote 
e you an idea. 

ys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
ist $ I 5. 

ys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
ist $ I 8. 

le reductions on all our Overcoats, 
' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Goods. No reserve. We must reduce 
t least $^5,ooo (thirty-five thousand 
ild weather leaves us overstocked 
5 us to take the loss. Call and see 




M. g. BURROWS & CO. 



o 
q 

id 
m 
a: 

UJ 

a 

O 

O 

y- 

(0 

D 
CO 



/ 



/ 

< 




PIEER FUEL CO., 



WKATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. 20 . — Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours comniencino 10 a.m. 
today : Colder ; fair weather. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



COAL 



CROSS CREEK LEHICH. 

FREE eURNIIG, 

ANIHRACIIE & BITUMmOUS. 



op 






WOOD 



Dry Maple, 

Uurd Mixed, 

.Slabs, 




CQHJIELLSVILLE 
M GAS HOUSE 



mm PBOMPTL! o[LiyEe[D 



TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Loais, 326 W. Saperlor St. 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



SPECIAL 





I- 




/• I 



AND THE- 



EAST -:- END 



Lots io West 




u n 



BARGAINS 



PORTRAITS! 

FREE! FREE! FREE! 

A [lEE-SlIE PORTRAIT GIVEN AWA! WITH EVER! PURCHASE 

OF $15 OR. OVER. 

Commencing Monday, JAN. I 3, and continuing for a short 
tirre only, we will give away to every customer buying goods 
amounting to $ I 5 or over, a life-size Portrait of himself or any 
other person whom he may wish, guaranteeing the work to be 
perfect in every respect, as samples in our window will prove. 
This, in connection with our 

Red Figure Mark - Down Sale 

Gi>'es you more than all the profit, but, as in the past, we are 
BCUND to be FOREMOST and LIBERAL, always giving you 
the BEST goods at the LOWEST prices, and something well 
worth having to remember us by besides. 





<BiSDOm 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



160 Acres in 9-49-16. 



That are unheard of bargains. 



80 


II 


9-49-16. 


40 


II 


1 -49- 1 6. 


320 


II 


36-48-16. 


80 


II 


Water Front, 


48-16. 




1 


2G 


rand Avenue lots. 


2 Lots on 


Central Avenue. 



LOUIS LANA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 26 
West Superior street, has opened at^ 



28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



With a complete stock of 




ACREAGE -;- 





That cannot be excelled by any agent in 

the city. 



y. 



I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $ I 750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $2000. 



orted and Domestic Cigafs 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Fioe Cut and Plug Tobaccos, Etc. 



ADDRESS 





bos: .a. .i^. oiT^z^, 



TeriDS on Houses, 1-4 Cash, Balance 
], 2 and 3 years at 8 Pef Cent. 



Don't forget the number, 



H. P. MILLS. 



«ti m m m\ iimmi mi mmi 



28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



/ 



LOUIS 



LANA. 




i« 



-^ 



ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 ;West Superior Streot. 




DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



FOK BARGAINS 

— «KK— 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
MOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDINO. 



VOL. 7; ]S^O. 248. 



DULUTH, MIK^N., TUESDAT, JA^TUABY 21, 1890. 



PBIC£ THB£I£ CEKTS. 



Do you Want to Boffow Monev? LllSI [DITIOM. 




We can let you have it and without delay. 



MONEY ON HAND 



Provided you have sufficient security. 



OUe OWN LAND OFFICE 



Is 



Causing a Good Deal 
Perplexity Down 
Washington. 



of 



in 



The Charges Acrainst Receiver 

Maginnis are but 

General 



OuF Bates ate the Lowest 




And Register Colville 
Stay Till His Term 
Over. 



Will 



IS 



Applications for loans wanted at once in 



, WEST OUtUTH Oil WEST SUPERIOR 



Improved or Unimproved Property taken. 



URGE - W - SMULL 





We have on hand $800, $ I 600 or $2400 

for a 



SNAP IN REAL ESTATE 



All cash. 



Heal Estate. Acies and Business Property a Specialty, 

Call and see what we have. 



Washington, Jan. 21.— The land office 
at Duluth is still the troublesome thing 
in the minds of those Miuoesotii men 
who are interest-ed in one way or another 
in appointments. 

Representative Comstock was ques- 
tioned today on the si bject of a successor 
to C. P. Maginnis, receiver, against whom 
it is said here that charges had been 
filed. Mr. Comstock corroborated this 
report. 

"I don't know just what the charges 
are," he said. "But I am aware that 
they have been tiled. I understand that 
they are general in their character. I 
don't know wheth^tr they are prompted 
by politicians or by parties interested in 
the big land questions that are all the 
time coming up for settlement in that 
part of the state. I have heard it 
charged that the business of the office 
is a year behind. I am not familiar with 
the facts and shall make no recommenda- 
tions for receiver until I learn something 
more definite. I am waiting to hear 
from the reliable business men of Du- 
luth. I don't think it is right to take 
any action that might reflect on a man's 
character on simply general charges. 

"The situation is very complicated. 
The magnitude of business done at that 
office makes it important to have a man 
who has sound business sense. There 
are so many interests that enter into the 
business of the Duluth office that great 
rivalry is created. The interests of those 
doing business there often clash. The 
office should have a business man as re- 
ceiver rather than a politician. I have 
been hoping that the appointment 
might be made on a business rather than 
a p<jlitical basis and have been waiting 
to see the business men of that land dis- 
I trict would not come to look at it in the 
same light. I shall make no recom- 
mendation until they are heard from. 

"I do not understand that any charges 
have been preferred against Mr. Col- 
ville, register, or that there is likelihood 
of his removal before the expiration of 
his term." 

Mr. Comstock said, in answer to a 
question, that he did not know whether 
the administration would remove Mi. 
Maginnis simply on general charges or 
not. 



A SINGU LAR A CCIDENT. 

A V'onng Jewettx Ule8 of Blood PoUoniog 
Contracted From a Glove. 

New York. Jan. 21. — A singular fatal- 
ity is reported from Warsaw, Poland. A 
young, wealthy and handsome Jewess 
from Kieflf was visiting her relations, 
who gave a ball in her honor. She pur- 
chased for the occasion a pair of long 
Danish gloves. While dancing the 
young lady felt a severe pain in her left 
wrist, which became suddenly inflamed 
and swollen. 

Investigation developed the fact that 
while making her toilet she had slightly 
pricked her wrist with a pin. A m^ical 
examination showed that she was suffer- 
ing from carbuncle and blood poisoning 
contracted from the glove, which, the 
doctors declared had been made from 
the skin of an animal suffering from car- 
buncle or antura. 

Notwithstanding the fact that every- 
thing known to medical science was 
brought into requisition the unfortunate 
patient died in terrible agony within 
forty -eight hours. Subsequent inquiries 
by the authorities develoi>ed the Ijact 
that tens of thousands of pairs of 7h© 
same make of gloves had been sold in 
England, France and Germany and also 
exported abroad. 





A Blazoned Train 

luth Carry Dul 

East. 



Built at Du 
uth Flour 



The 



Chamber of Commerce 
Considers Several 
Subjects. 



THE CHEA P RING S SAVED, 

But$20.000 in 



Bold 



Ulutuondit Stolen; 
Kolibery in Montreal. 

MoNTRiiAL., Jan. 21. — Last evening, 
while the streets in the neighboriiood 
were crowded, two men walked up to 
Walker's diamond store in Notre Dame 
street and tied the doors with rope. 
Then they rushed to a plate glass show 
window and smashed it with a heavy 
hammer. One snatched a tray of 
diamond rings, and the other swept 
every piece of diamond jewelry in the 
window into a bag. 

The only occupant of the store was 
Walker himself. He attempted to op«?u 
the door. Finding it was locked, he 
rushed behind the counter and l)egan 
shooting through the window, but the 
thieves had already made off. The crowd 
stared in astonishment while the men 
were grabbing the jewelrj-, but as soon 
as they began to run several people 
started after them. 

The man with the tray was chased 
half a mile, being collared on a warf by 
a messenger boy. The thief produced a 
revolver, but it was knocked from bis 
band. He had a tray of diamonds under 
his coat. At the police station he re- 
fused to give any name. The diamonds 
in the bag are said to be valued at be- 
tween il5,000 and 820,000. The tray 
contained only cheap rings. 



Within the week Duluth will adver 
tise her importance and her right to 
commercial consideration at the 
of the financial world in a highly unique 
manner. Some time next week a train 
of cars manufactured by the Minnesota 
Iron Car company of tb is city and loaddd 
with flour from the Imperial mill will 
pull out of Duluth, bound for Boston, 
via the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic 
road. On every car will be banners, 
flags and streamers across whose surface 
the magic name "Duluth" will be 
printed. Across the sides of the 
cars will Ije placed hangers, 
upon which will be statistics 
relating to this city. 

The cars and flour are ready, and as 
soon as the statistics are print.ed Du- 
luth's great advertisement will go a 
whizzing across the continent to the 
Atlantic seulward. 



AT THE CHAMBER. 




FIRE 



The best Foreign 
resented. 



:- INSURANCE. 

and American Companies rep- 
Policies correctly written. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



HOT THE WaTHER BUT THE LOW PRICES 



To Remove Apacheit. 

Washington, Jan. 21.— The President 
has sent to the senate a report made by 
Gen. Crook and Lieut. Heward upon the 
condition of Apache prisoners at Mount 
Vernon barracks, Alabama. The Presi- 
dent recommends that provision be made 
for locating these Indians upon lands in 
Indian territory- and says: "Some of 
these Indians have rendered good service 
to the government in pursuit and cap- 
ture of the murderous band that fol- 
lowed Geronimo. It is a reproach that 
they should not, in our treatment of 
them, be distinguished from the cruel 
and bloody members of the tribe now 
confined with them." 



PECU LIAR SUITS. 

The .Sanday CloKlii^ .iloventrnt in Denver 
to b« Fouglit in the C'uurti*. 

Denveu, Col., Jan. 21.— A new com- 
plication has arisen in the new Sunday 
closing question. The attorney for the 
Liquor Dealers association has served 
personal notice upi>n Sheriff Barton that 
he and his bondsmen would be held re- 
sponsible for any damage that his ac- 
tions yesterday might precipitate, and 
that civil suits would be filed against 
him, not under the direction of the as- 
sociation, but by individual dealres who 
might be put to ex{jense, trouble and 
annoyance. 

"These suits," said the attorney, "will 
be filed with a view to sending them 
through to the end and obtaining judg- 
ments." 

THE SALVATION ARMY. 



days 
name 
be a 



That are selling so many Winter Overcoats at the 
Big Ctu'uth. ~" 
quick," and 
Clothing at 



They have cut the prices 
will sell you anything in 



"to the 
Winter 



ACTUAL COST PRICES, 



They are naming prices you can't resist. 



Special Safpins in Boys' and Children's Suits and Overcoats. 




^iSDom 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 



♦ 



This beautiful property lies just above Oneota, and is about three-quarters 
Of • mile from Short Line depot. It Is platted topographically; large sized 
lots, 33x125 feet; the view from it splendid; the prices are low, and the 
terms are the very best. So situated that all city improvements must enhance 
Its values. 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



MACFIII)LAN[ & AUSTIN, 



HARRIS eROTHERS. 



WEST DULUTH. 



DULUTH 




QUITE A RISTO CRATIC. 

An Englishman Who Acted iw a Good 
Many AristorratM l>o. 

Victoria, B. C., Jan. 21.— A few 
ago an Englishman, who gave his 
as MuUahy, and who claimed to 
Captain in the English army, made his 
appearance in Seattle. He was of aris- 
tocratic appearance and put up at a 
first-class hotel. He succeeded in con- 
tracting quite a number of debts. He 
engaged in a game of pool with cattle- 
men and lost nearly !j2o00. He drew a 
check on the bank of British Columbia, 
in this city, for the amount, which was 
accepted. He then disappeared. 

The paper proved to be w^orthless and 
inquiries were set on foot to discover 
Mullahy's whereabouts. His desc-rip- 
tion was sent here and he was found to 
have put up at the the Druvard hotel last 
Thurs<lay. He registered under his proper 
name of Calthorpe and in the afternoon 
drove to Esquimault where he dined with 
Admiral Ueneage, who is an old friend. 
Upon his return to the city he induced 
the proprietor of the hotel to cash a 
check on Vancouver for i350. He then 
left by steamer for Vancouver. The 
check proved to be worthless. He was 
arrested and brought back here. The 
hotel proprietor states that HJalthorpe 
was here two years ago as a companion 
of Lord Chesterfield. 

It has been discovered that Calthrope 
is brother-in-law of Sir Richard Web- 
ster, attorney-general of Engljind. He 
was sent away from home by his people 
on account of his wild habits. 



Annual Keport of Its Fluauceit; The Army 
In Exrellent Condition. 

New York, Jan. 21. -^A copy of the 
annual report of the finances of the Sal 
vation Army, which was received in the 
London mails today, shows a pretty in 
terestiug state of affairs. The inter- 
national liabilities of the organization, 
including sundry creditors, loans, junior 
soldiers' reserve fund and annuity fund, 
etc., amount to no less a figure than Sl,- 
700,000. 

The assets of the army, including a 
small sum in bank, are placed at pre- 
cisely the same figure. The report 
gravely congratulates its readers upon 
the "excellent condition of solvencj" 
which is indicated by these figures. 

Court OreilleH Indians. 
Ashland, Wis., Jan. 21. — [Si>ecial.}— 
The Indians are starving and need help at 
once. Indian agent Leahy has just re- 
turned from a trip to Lac Court Oreilles 
reservation and says that if something is 
not done immediately many of thelndians 
in that reservation will starve. He urges 
that congress take immediate action. 



Not Eai»y With the Trust, 

New York, Jan. 21.— The application 
of Henry Winthrop Gray, as receiver of 
the defunut North River Sugar Refining 
company, for an injunction to restrain 
the sugar refining companies otherwise 
known as the "sugar trust" from parting 
•»ith any of the assets of the trust was 
argued this morning before Judge 
O'Brien in supreme court. It was al- 
leged by counsel for the receiver that 
the defendants are about to transfer 
their as^ts to the "Commonwealth com- 
pany," a Connecticut corporation, in 
which employes of the trust are inter- 
ested. 



Chicago's Death Rate. 
Chicago, Jan. 21.— The death rate of 
Chicago took another bound yesterday, 
when 111) mortuary certificates were filed. 
This number covers the last twenty-four 
hours. The prevailing epidemic is doubt- 
less responsible for at least twenty of 
these deaths. 



"War to Knsland." 

Lisbon, Jan. 21.— Four thousand mer- 
chants of tills city paraded the streets 
last night shouting: "War to England." 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



Senate MeetM— Deadlock Unbroken. 

Des Moine-s, la., Jan. 21.— The senate 
meets again this afternoon, having been 
in recess since Friday, in the hope that 
the deadlock in the house might be 
broken. Matters are still in statu quo. 
however, and until some arrangement is 
reached by both sides by which the 
house can beorganizetl, the inauguration 
of Governor-elect Boies must be indefi- 
nitely p<)8ti)oned, and Governor Larabee 
remain in possession. Meanwhile the 
governor-elect remains at his home in 
Waterloo, and will continue to do so 
until the call comes for him to journey 
to the capital. 

Driven From the Church. 

Chippewa Falls, Wis., Jan. 21.— .\n 
unusual occurrence took place at St. 
Marys Catholic church Sunday, being 
the public excommunication of Charles 
Bergern, a wealthy logger, and his niece, 
whom he had married. The marriage is 
forbidden by the church and state, but 
it was performed in New York, where 
such marriages are lawful. An anathema 
forbade the congregation from holding 
social or business relation with the 
couple. 

Sympathy for the i^uspectH. 

Trenton, N. J., Jan. 21.— Immediately 
upon assembling this morning the grand 
jury took up the case of the recent 
tragic death of Mrs. Kniffn. "The prose- 
cuting attorney will press fcJr an indict- 
ment for murder against Dr. Kniffn and 
Miss Purcell, but he admits that his evi- 
dence is weak, and it is doubtful if any 
indictment can be returned. Public 
opinion has veered around strongly in 
favor of the suspected persons. 

Merchant Tallorit Convene. 

Chicago, Jan. 21.— The rotunda of the 
Palmer house was crowded this morning 
by a couple hundred or more sleek, well 
dressed men. They were the delegates 
to the annual convention of the Mer- 
chant Tailors National Exchange of the 
United States of America, and repre- 
sented the various exchanges in the prin- 
cipal citiee of the country-. The con- 
vention opens its sessions this afternoon 
and will consider a number of questions 
of interest and importance to the trade. 

legislature Meets. 
Charleston, W. Va., Jan. 21.— Pur- 
suant to the call of Governor Wilson the 
legislature met in special session today. 
The most import^int question to be acted 
upon is the contest between A. B. Flem- 
ing and Nathan Goff for the office of gov- 
ernor. Members are slow in arriving, 
and nothing outside of routine business 
will be transaoted until Wednesday. 



The Chamber of Commerce Tallui Over 
liuslness Matters. 

Bishop McGolrick attended the Cham- 
ber of Commerce this morning. There 
was also present a delegation from the 
Lalxtr Federation. The draft of a 
memorial to congress for the improve- 
ment of Duluth harbor, canal and lake 
entry was submitted to the chamber, 
and was unanimously adopted. The 
document was signed by the directors 
and will be sent to Washington at 
ouce. 

A communication was received from 
S. Hirsch, calling the attention of the 
chamber to discriminations by the 
salt trust against Duluth and in 
favor of Wisconsin pointe. Mr. Hirsch 
said that to Wisconsin towns a barrel of 
salt cost in transportation seventy-two 
cents, while Dnluth paid if 1.25, a discrim- 
ination in favor of Wi^jconsin of fifty- 
three cents. 

A letter was received from Hon. H. T. 
Helverson, commissioner of agriculture 
for North Dakota, regarding the desti- 
tution in that state. The matter was 
referred to a committee. A communi- 
catit)n from Hon. George H. Ely recom- 
mended that the Chamber send a 
committee to Washington to present 
Duliith's needs and requiremente for 
lake navigation improvemente. Messrs. 
Sutphin, Hartley and Secretary 
Phelps were appointed and consented to 
serve. Senator Davis also wrote regard- 
ing a Duluth delegation. He said that 
Mr. Ely had made an excellent impres- 
sion before the senate committee. 

A committee from the American Fed- 
eration of Labor, Duluth society, brought 
to the notice of the Chamber the com- 
plainte of painters engaged ontheCham- 
ber of Commerce building. A commit- 
tee of five was chosen to look into the 
matter, and a meeting will be called Ije- 
fore the committee to give both painters 
and contractors an opportunity to state 
their complaints. 

Committees on Ontario plan of assess- 
ment, on street car service and the one 
chosen to confer with Old Superior 
people regarding harbor improvements 
asked for further time. Bishop Mc( iol- 
rick advised sending statistical circulars 
to the GoO total abstinence societies of 
the country presenting Duluth's claims 
as a commercial center. This idea was 
favored by the Chamber. 



WORLDS F AIR C OMMITTEE. 

The House Committee on Worlds Fair Sits 
Today in Washlnffton. • 

Washington, Jan. 21.— The special 
house committee on Worlds fair held ite 
first meeting this morning. All mem- 
bers were present except Hatch and 
Belden. Mr. Springer called up his reso- 
lution providing, that the house shall 
proceed next Thursday to select a site 
for the fair by ballot and it was dis- 
cussed for an hour. He urged the im- 
portance of speedy action. He held 
that by its action in Cannon resolution 
last week the house had virtually de- 
cided that the matter must be settled as 
early as possible and that the committee 
was practically under instructions and 
as much bound as if they had been for- 
mnlated. He argued that the house 
oould not move in the matter until it 
had first settled where the fair was to be 
held. 
hand#t? ^i"- H'^t also declared in favor of im- 
mediate selection of site by the house 
and pointed out how delay jeopardized 
the chances of a fair. He said that the 
committee had been working for some 
time on the fair bills, and '^had practi 
cally completed preliminary arrange- 
mente. Mr. Flower thought the date 
fixed for balloting in the Springer reso- 
lution was a little too soon. He sug- 
gested that a resolution be reported pro- 
viding for debate in the house next 
Monday — one hour and a half to be allow- 
ed for presentation of claims of each city — 
to be followed by balloting on Tuesday. 
Mr. Belden expressed doubt as to 
whether any fair could be held in 1892. 
It should first be settled that the gov- 
ernment would give money aid to 
the fair before an attempt was made to 
select a site. This brought Washing- 
ton to the fore with strong objections. 
They contended that to adopt Mr. Bel- 
den's course would result in combining 
all other contending cities against Wash- 
ington, which must rely upon govern- 
ment financial aid. Mr. Belden's side 
was that a historical celebration could 
be held in 1892 to be followed a year 
later by the World's fair. The chair- 
man's attention wjis here called to the 
language of the resolution under which 
the committee was appointed, which 
speaks of a World's Fair in 1892 
and the point was made that the com- 
mittee had no alternative and could 
deal with no proposition that did not 
cxmcern a fair to Ije held in that year. 

Mr. Frank, of Missouri, offered a reso- 
lution that the Springer resolution be 
referred to a sub-committee of three 
with instructions to report Thursday. 
The sub-committee was selected as fol- 
lows: Chairman Candler, and Messrs. 
Hitt and Flower. The committee de- 
cided to hear arguments respecting site 
for fair. Then the committee adjourned 
till lliursday. 



OF WORLD WIDE MOMENT: 



Ban< of England to 
tiflcates and 
Silver. 



Issue Cer- 
Buy 



Three Million Pounds of Silver 

Already in Its 

Vaults. 



All 



Europe Will Follow 

Bi-Metalisnn if Britain 

Leads. 



jn 



GET READY TO BUY. 



NELLIE BLY. 



The Little Globe Trotter on American Soil 
Once More. 

San Francisco, Jan. 21. — The steamer 
Oceanic, with Miss Nellie Ely among her 
]>assengere, arrived here at 9:3(Vthis 
morning. Miss Bly was taken off in a 
tug as soon as the steamer entered the 
harbor, and was taken at once to Oak- 
land, where she boarded a special train 
which was in waiting and started on the 
overland journey via Southern Pacific 
and Atlantic and Pacific routes to New 

York. 

THE CAN ADIAN LEAVEN. 

Canuck Newspaper Kdilors Try to Influ- 
ence CongreHS In Annexation. 

ToRo.NTO, Ont., Jan.21.— The Globe to- 
day publishes the following sensational 
special from Washington: 

"Interest in Canadian matters was a 
good deal excited here last week by the 
visit of one of the editors of The Toronto 
Empire, a Dominion government organ, 
apparently sent here specially to investi- 
gate whether or not the editor of The 
Toronto Mail haA been propagating 
annexation sentimente in the miuds of 
the Hoar committee in order to induce 
them to report adversely to intimate 
trade relations, because such relations 
would postpone 'political union. The 
Empire man interviewed sev- 
eral senators on the committee 
on Canadian relations, and 

much to the surprise of the democratic 
members, they learned that E<iward 
Farrer, editor of The Mail, had been 
before the republican members in secret 
session, and that the infor i ation thus 
received, and which does not form a part 
of the record, has not been conveyed to 
dem(x:ratic members. 

"Considerable feeling has been engen- 
dered between the sections of the com- 
mittee in consequence. The representa- 
tive of The Empire apparently perfectly 
satisfied himself that the republican 
members had been greatly infiuenced by 
representations of The Mail that annex- 
ation was only a <^u€>stion of time if re- 
cii)rocity vras denied and if existing com- 
plications were allowed to create irrita- 
tion natural to their continuance." 



Immediate Action Kxpected un the Sale of 
Minnesota Ueservatiou Pine. 

Washington, Jan. 21. — [Special.]— The 
report of the Chippewa Indian commis- 
sion will be submitted to the interior 
department this week for ajiproval. and 
it will be approved without doubt, to be 
followed by immediate preparations for 
the sale of the pine land on the reserva- 
tions. 

WEATHE R ABO UT US. 

Many Killed in the Far Wftst; on the 
Atlantic. 

Tacoma, Wash., Jan. 21.— At least ten 
human beings and thousands of cattle 
and sheep perished in the blii.zard 
which began with the new year and 
raged over Washington for a week. 

Reports from Colville reservation are 
to the effect that cattle are dying by 
hundreds from starvation and thirst, 
and that the ground is covered with over 
two feet of snow on a level and that in 
some places it is drifted mountain high. 
The keeper of a stage station twelve 
miles from Alma started to walk to town 
last Thursday, and Sunday his body was 
found on the prairie on'y a mile from his 
home, frozen stiff. A. mail carrier at 
Wild Gcxjse creek i>erished on the Wme 
day, and eight cattlemen are known to 
have lost their lives in the storm. Cat- 
tlemen estimate that they will lose one- 
half of their herds this season. 



N E\i York, Jan. 21.— There was a ru n lor 
on W*ll street which, considering 1,he ~^1^. 
discussion of Secretary Windom's sil ver ^ 
propoj ition, occasioned considerable colo- 
ment. 

Mesjrs. Zimmerman and Forshay an- 
nounoxl that they had received advices 
from London to the effect that the 
Bank jf England is about to exercise its 
right, aever hitherto asserted, to use 
silver to the extent of one-third of its 
reservo, and issue £1 notes in silver 
agains: it. The dispatehes also said that 
the ba ak had purchased 3,000,000 pounds 
of sil v)r bullion in expectation of this 
action. _ 

Thei e has been a great deal of silver 
talk fo r the last few days, which, with 
the recent heavy shipments of bullion 
to England and the advance in price, 
has oc< asioned more or less si>eculation. 
The la:ger foreign firms on the street, 
while they declared that they have re- 
ceived nothing confirming the rumored 
action if the Bank of England, said that 
such a step was by no means unlikely, 
on the contrary, that there were many 
reasons why such a thing would be ad- 
vantagK)us to England. 

One jauker went so far as to say that 
if the Bank of England should use this 
right tliere would be such a period of 
S]>ecuti:tion and general inflation in this 
countr." as has not been experienced 
since the discovery of gold in California. 
Mr. I'orshay said that he was confi- 
dent tb at the dispatch he received was 
well founded. 

"There have been," he continued,"very 
heavy t xportations of silver M England 
recentl/, the last shipment being last 
Friday, when we sent over 200.000 
ounces. I think, however, that our dis- 
pateh i itended to say that the bank had 
accumilated 3,000,000 ounces, or about 
83,000.0 X), instead of i:3,000,000. But the 
former itbelf is a very large sum. I be- 
lieve tiat, should any step toward 
silver cisrtificates be taken in England, 
it will have been taken merely 
in anticipation of Mr. Windom's plan. 
Not alo le this, but it will be of a great 
advanc<' toward the establishing of 
bimetal ism and an international cur- 
rency. For this fact is indubitable, that 
Eu^jland and the United States control 
the money markete of the world. If 
England should follow our example and 
adopt s Iver as the basis of }>art of its 
basis o! circulation, France, Germany 
and of course the other countries of 
Europe, could not afft>rd to follow their 
lead." 



DAKOTA'S DEST ITUTION. 
An Official Statement to Tlie Herald Based 
OB ObHervatlon. 
Under date of Jan. 17, Hon. H. T. Hel- 
gesen, oommissioner of Agriculture and 
labor of North Dakota, writes to Duluth 
from Grand Forks: "1 find the con- 
dition of several thousand people in 
North Dakota fully as bad as heretofore 
rejwrted. The following will give official 
account of the condition of the more 
needy counties: 

Nelson county, 1200 destitute; flour 
and fuel in greatest need; have no grain 
for stock, but nearly enough hay; cloth- 
ing also needed. Ramsey, 1200 
destitute, with needs about the 
same as Nelson, except that 
settlers are allowed to cut wood to 
a limited extent from the military reser- 
vation. Tower, needs same as Nelson. 
Rollett", very few in imperative need of 
aid, but quite a number said to be reach- 
ing that point. Bottineau, 300 families 
reported destitute, with needs same 
as Nelson, except they have enough 
hay, and also, I think, can get some coal 
from the mines in their own country, 
e asted more information from the 
authorities there. Pierce: seventv-five 
to 100 families suffering. Needs 'same 
as Nelson. Benson, sixty-three families, 
including 160 children reported desti- 
tute, and 125 people in addition will need 
supplies as soon as they can be reached. 
Mcintosh doubtless needs some help, 
but have had a^ exact information from 
there yet. 

Another appeal is made to Duluth, 
and it is to be hoi>ed that the citizens 
will respond with the generosity char- 
acteristic of Duluthians. 

The reports of destitution in North 
Dakota have not been exaggerated, but 
on the contrary the worst has not been 
told. The peoi)le there must have help 
and at once. At the least calculation 
7500 people are in destitute circumstan- 
ces in a few c<mntiee. Donations of 
clothing, ete., may be left at the Wells- 
Stone Mercantile company's building on 
Fifth avenue west. The Manitoba will 
carry such freight free of charge. The 
Herald will forward any money left for 
these sufferers. 



REAL ESTATE. 



A Kecord of the Real Estate Transfers for 
24 Hours Ending at Noon. 

H Horovitz to John Schuiiian. lot 9. 

block 22. Sellwtxjd * ajo 

L H NoslicT to W Courtney, 8e>4 an-i "ii 

of i.f'-*. ami ne'i of sW*. 2«-.t»»-15 
C .Standard to C Fulorsoii. lot 27, block 



8.000 



7. Hunters Grajisy Point. ' »vi 

Nils F.terson to Wv Karring1on,'e'/i of 
lot 171. block 7. Third .. .. « 600 



6,600 
175 



^."^.?".^, M'"l.'»™P'"»>' 'o B Horovitz, 
lot », block 22... . 

C E Dickertnan to E C " wbais. lot ' 8. 
block t), Wiwt End 

•*-*'.'■, '*V^'".'"f.^' Arthur CJiiniww.Jot 
.. block «4, West Dulutb. Second . 

I»ul8 Beurlva^ Uj W <; Farrlinrton, 
W, oflotlW, block 7, Third »3uu 

A A WolfersinTfrcr u. A A SmiUi. su'of 

Francois Koy to Louis Koucbleiu seii 

of 11WI4 and .swi» of ce'* and ue'» of 

SWI4 and nw'i of soi^, ;i4-ri!)-i7. ... 
Albeit Dorosia to Louis Kouehleau. lots 

■{ and t, and W j of eo'^. ;ilii»-17. . . . 
West Uulutb Ijind ct)inj)au — 

wal<l, lots 4 aud 6, bloc, 

luth. Fifth ... 
C V t nti^ to C H Wilson, lots ii and 12, 

block l:j. KimUTlc.v 4: Strvkcrs 
K torlx's to A Aruhambault,lot*, bltjck 



I nan J to F Got li- 
ck 165, West Du- 



360 

1000 



9,000 



2,9)0 
2,300 



760 
600 



«. ■'paldinjs addition. 
McKi 



Wm 



in McKiuley to W B Peek. eH of nek 
of sc'ii of sec 24, and uc^« of aiwVO-l«. . 

15 transfers; consideration 



600 

6,000 
$47,276 



Five Indians Kill. 

Helena, Jan. 21. — The news comes 
from Flathead Lake that thirteen In- 
dians attemt)ted to cross the lake near 
what is known as Wild Horse Island, 
Sunday afternoon, where the channel is 
narrow and apparently the ice is of suf- 
ficient thickness to sustain the weight 
of a human being. The Indians had 
light ponies with them, and by crossing at 
this point, expected to save a few miles. 
Eight of the party crossed from the 
island to the main land in safety, but 
five riding close together broke through 
the ice and with their ponies were 
drowned. 

Worst Kver Known. 

London, Jan. 21.— The Cunard steamer 
Gallia, Capt. Murphy, from New York 
Jan. 12 for Liverpool, arrived at Queens- 
town at midnight last night. Capt. Mur- 
phy says that the weather on the pass- 
age was the worst he ever experienced. 

THE PROMISED LAND. 



A BAD COLLISION. 



Four are Killed and Several Iqjured In 
Omaha Today. 

Omaha, Neb., Jan. 21. — There was a 
collision of suburban trains on the Belt 
line division of the Missouri Pacific this 
morning within the city liniite. 

William Boyle, a local democratic poli- 
tician, was killed instantly. J. Schwarick, 
deputy county treasurer, was injured in- 
ternally; J. A. Harvey aud a man named 
Vandeventer were badly crushed, all 
probably fatally. S. Fraher and Frank 
Church had their legs broken; two 
brothers named Metzlaffs, railroad shop 
boys, were very seriously injured, one 
had his skull fractured. Several other 
passengers were more or less bruised. 
The conductor, Wm. Shilds, had an arm 
broken and was badly crushed. 



Great Kxcitement Over the Settling on the 
Sioux Ceded Lands. 

Pierre, S. D., Jan. 21.— Hundreds of 
boomers of this city who were anxiously 
awaiting the news of the President's 
proclamation opening the Sioux reserva- 
tion have completely organized for a 
concentrated movement to occupy .the 
land, the minute the wires bring word 
from Washington. 

South Pierre boomers have reorganized 
and will again try to occupy the town- 
site. Fort Pierre citizens are making 
preparations to guard against them. 
They have called for further reinforce- 
mente of troops from Fort Sully, and it 
is understood two more companies will 
be stationed there at once to protect 
settlers on the mile square and preserve 
order when the rush begins. A number 
of officials of the Northwestern road 
came up yesterday and spent the after- 
noon looking up the mile square. This 
survey, taken together with the recent 
notice JFrom Marvin Hughitt, that the 
Northwestern claimed the mile square 
according to government treaty, gives 
color to the belief that the company is 
now arranging to take possession of the 
entire townsite, immediately upon issue 
of the proclamation. 

Black Tomahawk, the Indian pre- 
emptor of the same land, has completed 
his residence and now claims he will 
enforce bis righte with all the Sioux 
nation if necessary. Houses are going 
up like magic and the Indian police and 
troops have hard work to keep i>eople 
who are allowed at Fort Pierre from 
constantly encroaching upon the coveted 
lands. 



Mf!. STICK NEY'S SCHEME. 

I'ushlns the Railway CleariuK House 
Project in the Kast. 

Baltimore, Jan. 21.— President A. B. 
Slickne>f, of the Chicago, St. Paul & 
Kansas City railroad, called upon Presi 
dent Mayer and Vice President Thomas 
M. Kin^ , at the Baltimore & Ohio Cen- 
tral bui ding, in the interest of the new 
railroad clearinfjhouse scheme he would 
like to gee established .n Chicago. 

He wiis able to present all necessarj- 
details of the plan to Mr. King, but 
President Mayer could not listen to him 
long enough to give a decision. Mr. 
Sticknev thinks he can arrange to have 
the imn ense freight traffic coming into 
Chicago handled much moroexpediously 
and satisfactorily than at present. Mr. 
Stickne;' proposes to have yards of all 
large ra Iroad systems which enter Chi 
cago bu It around a circular track out- 
side the city. From this circular track 
other tr icks are to radiate to each yard 
in ite viiiinity^ 

Mapping Out a Policy. 

Clevi land, Jan. 21.— Delegates to the 
national convention of non-oartisan tem- 
perance women, which opens here to- 
morrow to bring into existence an organ- 
ization i Q opposition to the W. C. T. U., 
are arri\ ing in large nutrbers and the 
success of the gathering seems already 
insured. Representetives from various 
stetes aie in conference today mapping 
out a plan of policy to be submitted to 

the cenvention. 

^— 

Remo'ed to the I'nited States Senat«. 

Chica )o, Jan. 21.— Col. W. A. Clark, 
Butte, A [ont., one of the most prominent 
democratic politicians of the new state, 
is at the Grand Pacific. He says there 
is no chf nee that the political situation 
will be ctianged or the dead-lock in Mon- 
tana legislature be broken until the 
United iiitates senate examines the cre- 
dentials of the four men who will go to 
Washington and ask to be seated as 
senators. 

Wo rth Trying in Washington. 

Paris, Jan. 21. — In coattequence of a 
scene in chamber deputies yesterday, 
when tl e Boulangist and reac^tionist 
memborf attemptetl to prevent M. 
Joffrin fi om speaking, it is proposed to 
suspend the leaders of the disorder — 
Mm. Lh^ uerre, Deroulede and Millevoie 
— for the whole session instead of for a 
fortnight, which was the punishment 
meted ot t to them by the president of 
the chan: ber yesterday. 



Today's Registry. 

The weather or something else is hav- 
ing a bad effect on the ix)lls of registry. 
So far very few have registered. At 
noon in both piecincteof the Third ward 
there were less than a dozen new names, 
and this is a pretty good indication of 
the condition of affairs at all the pre- 
cincte. The poll listo comprise the 
names of those who voted at the last 
election. Tomorrow the registry will l>e 
oi)en until next Tuesday, which will be 
the last opportunity to register l^efore 
election. 

The Vonng .Man Found. 
A ver>- surprised young man was Hans 
Wannaboe this morning when waking 
up he saw officer Gillon at his bedside. 
As soon as he recovered from his sur- 
prise, Gillon read a warrant for his arrest 
on the charge of bastardy preferred by 
Mary Martenson. Hustling on his clothes 
Hans was escorted to the police court, 
where after the nature of his offense was 
explained to him, he asked for an exam- 
ination, and his trial wjis set for the 30th 
inst.. bail being required in the sum of 
$300. As Mr. Wannalxn? had no friends 
ready to go bail for him, he was hx^ked 
up^ This is ti.e case that was mentioned 
in I'he Herald yesterday. 

Duluth's Telephone Company. 

The Duluth Telephone company has 
issued ite annual statement for 1889. 
The eompany now has strung .300 miles 
of w ire and has 500 telephones in use. It 
has wires strung for a direct distance of 
over twenty-three miles, connecting 
Lakeside, Duluth, West Superior, Supe- 
rior and South Range, nine miles be- 
yond Superior. The company is now 
erecting poles in First alley, from which 
a cable will be run into the Palladio and 
Chamber of Commerce buildi ngs. 

Making it Warui.for Prentice. 

A meeting was held at the Chamber 
of Commerce this afternoon, the object 
of which was to take concerted action 
in fighting Fredrick Prentice's claims to 
property in Third division. Many own- 
ers of Third division property were pres- 
ent, or represented by proxy, and 
various plans for defeating Prentice's 
intentions were set forth. The meeting 
was very spirited, and tsome warm re- 
marks were indulged in. The anxiety 
for settlement evinced by some was very 
unfavorably commented on, especially 
when Mr. Prentice has with unfailing 
regularity lost his case, and when a test 
case is now on the calendar of the United 
Stetes court. 



Umterian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



Look This Up. 

A double corner on the upper side of 

East Second street in Endion. Price for 

this week, $2G00, W cash; balance in 1 

and 2 years. D. H. Stevenson & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 



REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

[00 Acres in 4-50;i4, 25 percent below the 
market. 
200 Acres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on the hill below 
the nnarket. 

2 Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A f sw of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terins. 

A f2w desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash pay- 
ment, if improved. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 0, Metropolitan Block. 



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DULXrriEL li PEKING 



EVEXIXG^ HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD, PMbllahar. 



^ 



PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Dally, by mall, per year $7.00 

Dally, by mall, p«r three months 2.00 

Daily, by mall, per one month 76 

IS THK crtr. 
Dally, by carrier, per week 18 



Bntered at the pofltoffiee at Duluth. 
•ecoQd-class mail matter. 



MliiH.. as 



BB^Tbe WashioKlon office of The Herald U 
at I-C4 New Vork avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kept uu tile and where The Herald 
correspondent will welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



Call for Kepublican Caucuit. 

All legally tiualltl>d voters who intend to 
Tote for the reput)liean candidates for the 
various offices to be UUed in lliu city of Duiulb 
on February 4. l!<Wi, ut the rejfular city elec- 
tion, are berel)y notified that caucuses will be 
held l)elwefu the liours of 6 and ."* p. m., on 
January 'U. l!W, for tlie purpose of electing 
delegaleci to the city rebublicau convention. 

The places for uoldiug' caucuses and the 
Dumtier of deletrates to which each precinct is 

5 toll 

433 

Store, 

building. 



entitled have licen establl.>^he<l as t'ollow: 

^'i^^t ward— Asji Daley's lumber office, 
Lalic avenue south. 

Sjecoud ward— James McBeth's store. East 
Superior street. 

Third wanl, Hrst Precinct— Store 
First avenue east and First street. 

Second precinct— ill Kast :?uperior street. 

Tliird precinct— East Knd livery barn. 

Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
street. 

Second precinct— 319 West Superior street. 

Third preciuel— 7ul West Superior street. 

Fifth ward, First precinct— IHUS West Su- 
perior street. 

Second precinct— ii3B Garfield avenue. 

Thinl prtvinct- liCi West .Michigan street. 

Sixth ward— -iSl West Michigan street. 

The basis of representation lias been ti.\ed at 
one delegate to each llX) votes or majjr frac- 
tion thereof cast fur the republican candidate 
at the last presidential election, and one dele- 
gate at large for eai-h precinct. 

Each ward is entitletl to the following repre- 
sentation: thirst ward, 4 delegates; Second 
wani, o delegates; Third wanl. Urst precinct 
4 delegates; Setxind prtviut, ;t delegates: Third 
precinct, 3 delegates; Fourth ward. First pre- 
cinct, 5 delegates: Second precinct. 4 delegates; 
Third preeiiict. y delegates; Filth ward. First 
precinct, .ideiegate?; Second precinct, 4 dele 



snow is promptly cleared oflF, before it is 
trodden hard, there will be no ice to 
speak of — and none to clear away. The 
Herald hopes to see some ordinary com- 
mon sense applied to this question. 
A hundred other cities have 
heavier snowfalls to deal with 
than Duluth, and a hundred 
other cities have cleared 

their sidewalks with a tithe of 
the fuss and delay which this simpler 
nuisance has been subjected to here. If 
there was any serious disposition on the 
part of the committee on ordinances to 
secure and present the draft of a lawful 
measure which would have relieved the 
city, it ct)uld have been etTected without 
difficulty last eveninjj. Then the aider- 
men could have been put sijuarely to the 
test on the question whether they want 
our sidewalks to remain a disgrace to 
the city or not. We have heard some 
cheap talk about the hardship to prop- 
erty owners to compel them to keep 
their bordering walks clear. Now let us 
have some words to the purpose touch- 
ing the hardship to the puWic at large 
from the insufferable neglect of property 
owners to do their duty. 



day while Kooney was getting his first pajiers 
saw him get them and heard him ask the 
clerks "not to let the newspapers know for 
they'd roast me." How, now. Citizen Roouey y 



NEWS IN CRUDE SHAPE. 



fates. Third precinct, o delegates; SLxtb ward, 
di ' 



I delegates. 



Jakes Dinow.\i^, 
JoH.N H. L.vVaque, 

P. S. A.V.NKKE, 

Cr.\kli:s Dt:>c.vs, 

H. S. LOKD, 

S. M. Lkster, 
City Kepublican Com. 



Call for City Repulilican Convention. 

All duly elected delegates to the city repub- 
Ucaa convention will meet in the council r<Mm 
at the city hail, Dulutli, Minnesota, on Jan. 35, 
lt*i. at - p. m.. for tlie puriKwe of placing In 
nomination republican candidates for the var- 
ious offices as follows: .Mai or; two aldermen. 
First warii; one alderman. Second ward; one 
aldcriiiau. Third ward ; one alderman. Fourth 
ward: one alderman. Fifth ward; one alder- 
man, Siath ward. 

M. O. Hall. Chairman Com. 



THE ICE ROUTE. 

The farmers of several counties of 
Manitoba are reported to have lately 
passed resolutions calling on the Do- 
minion government to see that the rail- 
way connecting Manitoba and the Hud- 
son Bay be put through at once, to the 
end that they may have "direct and 
cheap communication with Europe." 

But It is hardly probable, however 
prodigal tlie Dominion government may 
be with its lands and grants of money 
that it will look with favor at this hy- 
perborean scheme, a scheme in which 
none but these blinded by a 
false self-interest or by prejudice, 
can see advantage to the Northwest, or 
the possibility of protitable investment. 
The fact of the matter is, this Hudson 
Bay project of railway and ocean steam- 
ship communication with the marts of 
Europe is utterly impossible of profitable 
fulfilment. 

It is granted that the railway from 
Winnipeg to the great bay can be con- 
structed at no unusual expense. Sur- 
veys already made have shown ttus. 
But surveys have also shown that Hud- 
son bay. while seldom if ever freezing 
over from shore to shore, is so beset by 
floating bergs and floeb of ice that navi- 
gation is extremely difficult and danger- 
ous except in July, August, September 
and in favorable years October also. 
Now vessels to navigate that sea even in 
these three or four months must be pro- 
vided to withstand the full rigors of an 
Arctic ocean; m other words, must be 
built of extre:ne strength. They must 
be so solid thntthey would be practically 
useless for any other traffic, and even in 
that of Hudson Bay could carry but 
small cargoes comparatively. They 
would therefore not be dividend-earners 
in the eight or nine months they could 
not navigate Hudson Bay. Interest 
and expense go on everyday, but a route 
whoae limited earning capacity is cut to 
three months can hardly be profitable. 

The real solution of the cheap trans- 
portation question for the farmers of the 
Canadian Northwest is in the shortest 
and best communication with the At- 
lantic ocean at Duluth. Part of this 
object will be attained when the Duluth 
<fc Winnipeg and the Northern Pacific & 
Manitoba have their systems complete. 
The final attainment of cheap transpor- 
tation will not be attained until the 
Dominion deepens and broadens its St. 
Lawrence and Welland canals to allow 
ocean vessels to anchor at our wharves. 
Let the farmers of Manitoba and all 
who hope for the Northwest strive for 
this. 



Alderman Costello made a plain state- 
ment before the council last evening of 
his course in the selection of the library 
committee. We credit him with the 
straightforward and honest intention of 
selecting a committee that would repre- 
sent fairly and capably the opinions of 
the public at large, without regard to 
fanciful social distinctions, on public 
library questions. We fully agree with 
Alderman Swanstrom that all citizens 
here are American citizens and we draw 
no line of birth or descent, but we are 
inclined to think that he would have 
been one of the first to object to the 
selection of a committee to act for the 
public in this city which had no man of 
Scandinavian descent on it. For with 
the known composition of the public in 
this city, such an omission would have 
been looke<l upon by many as an inten- 
tional discrimination and probable slight. 
The Herald counts every man a true 
American citizen who is one in the eye 
of the law and in heart is loyal to the 
tiag and the principles embedded in our 
constitution. But it does not ignore the 
further fact that care should be taken 
in selecting representative committees 
not to give occasion for offense by even 
a fancied slight on the score of race or 
creed. 



City Assessor Coolev: Just back from 
St. Paul. Quiet? \Vell, I should re- 
mark! There's no Eastern capital com- 
ing there now and business is jiretty 
slow in both the Saintly city and Minne- 
aix)lis. A heavy coal dealer told me 
money was awfully tight there; almost 
impossible to make collections, and it's 
just the same in ail lines of business. 

B. F. Mackall, formerly of Duluth. in 
Moorhead News: There are seven per- 
sons sick in our house with the grip. 
The nurse has it the worst of any and 
so far there is little improvement in her 
case. Mrs. Kurtz's three children, Tom, 
Will and the baby, Henry Mackall, the 
nurse and the cook and Gus are all un- 
der its intiueace. 

Col. Tanner, of the Minnesota Iron 
Car company: Our quota of cars for 1800 
will be over 3000. about one-third of all 
tube iron cars manufactured 
in the United States. To meet 
this order we will begin soon 
in building ten cars a day. The 
number of cars built for the Iron Car 
company, practically the same as the 
Minnesota Iron Car company of Duluth, 
during the year 1889 was 7840. This in- 
cludes those built by the Huntingdon 
Manufacturing company. 

Vice President Carpenter, Duluth & 
Iron Range: It is hard to say how much 
ore the Iron Riinge road will carry this 
year. It all depends on the state of the 
market, the price of labor, etc. The iron 
market at present is very firm, and the 
outlook for the season was never better. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 




MAYORALTY ACROSTIC. 



From a banking point of view : 

M arine bank. 
St A t« bank. 
Fi R Bt National. 
Securi Ty. 
Stewart Jt Br I tts bank. 

Ma N ufaoturers bank. 

National Bank O f Commerce. 

H alt A. Ck>. 
Ameriean Excb A nge. 

Bel L & Eyster. 
Be L 1 Jt Co. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



The discussion in the council last even- 
ing on the question of clearing snow 
from the sidewalks here makes it evi- 
dent that several aldermen prefer that 
the city should take no action whatever 
in the matter. If they want this city 
left in the condition of a poverty-stricken 
snow bound village, it is certain that the 
mass of people here is dea<l set against 
them, and it is the people who will have 
what they want, not the aldermen. 
Alderman Kennedy, chairman of the 
committee on ordinances, offered the 
lame excuse for inaction that the city 
attorney had assured him that the city 
had no authority to assess property to 
cover the expense of cleaning oflf the 
walks. Grant this for the argument's 
sake. What of it? Will the alder- 
man pretend or the city attorney 
pretend that the city is helpless in face of 
this ordinary nuisance. If property 
owners cannot be assessed they can un- 
doubtedly be fined for maintaining a 
public nuisance on their sidewalks. 
What difference does it make how the 
nuisance got there, whether from the 
clouds or from the kitchen stove? The 
sole fact of importance is that it is there, 
and the city can unquestionably so de- 
clare and compel property owners to 
clear it off, under penalty of any fine 
necessarj- to insure prompt compliance 
with the order. Alderman Thomas 
talks like a child of the impossibility of 
removing ice from the walks. If the 



A friend writes me from New Vork this 
gossip of Jay Cooke: I saw Jay Cooke in the 
Fifth Avenue last night. He is a very old man 
now, and has seen a great deal of tlie shadow 
and sunshine of life. Yet he is contented, 
cheerful and rich. He is a striking character. 
He dresses more like a farmer than a great 
financier, and his slouch hat and white 
whiskers give him a very plcturest4ue appear- 
ance. Mr. Cooke was born up at Sandusky, on 
Lake Erie, and was brought to Washington 
from the obscurity of this Ohio town by Sal- 
mon P. Chase to take part in placing our first 
national loans during tlie war. He at once 
became a great financial power at the national 
capital, and no man has ever lived in this 
country who has at one time and another ex- 
erted a wider influence upon its fiscal affairs 
than did Jay Cooke for a number of years. 
Tlie Northern Pacific railroad ruined him. 
.Mr. Cook was an old man when failure over- 
tix)k him, in 1874. Yet he has made a great 
fortune since that time. He owns the raiirtmd 
running from Carlisle to Gettysburg, Pa., and 
has other large corporate interests. While he 
has given up banking, he is still a power in 
financial circles, and takes a lively interest in 
all monetary affairs. He lives just outside of 
Philadelphia on a beautiful estate kept by his 
son-in-law. It is within a stone's throw of 
"Ogontz," that magnificent palace and coun- 
try seat, which Mr. Cooke occupied when he 
failed. That has now passed into other hands, 
and is used as a swell young ladles' school, 
probably one ot the most expensive institu- 
tions of the kind in the country. 

* * * 
Apropos of the recent death of Hon. W. D. 

Kelley, Pig Iron Keliey, as his friends called 
him, I remember an anecdote told me of him 
over a year ago by our mutual friend John 
Birkinbine. They had been at a banquet to- 
gether and the conversation turned on educat- 
ing children, especially girls. Judge Kellev 
had sent a daughter to European schools and 
to schools in this country and had given her 
a splendid education. "But," said he, as he 
put his hand on Birkinbine's shoulder, "don't 
educate the heart out of your children." 

* * * 
The loads that are hauled In the lumber 

woods would surprise a tenderfoot. Thev sur- 
prise old-timers sometimes. What do you 
think of a team of liorses or yoke of oxen haul- 
ing on a snow road a high load of logs that 
would weigh down between two and 
three freight cars'/ But it Is sometimes 
done and loads nearly as large are frequent. 
A logging road Is about as perfect a piece of 
mechanism as a good rallrcad and it takes 
about as much skill to lay out one as the other, 
though perhaps skill of slightly differing 
natures. A logging road is never up hill, 
never down steep grades, always on a lerel or 
a slight descent. It is broad, for the sleighs, 
oi- log bunks, are to an ordinary household 
what the latter is to a boy's hand sled. It 
must be smooth as a dollar and as easy as a 
rocking chair. How else could horses draw 
thirty or forty tons at a load? Said a lumberman 
today: "The other day my men got to racing 
to see who c-ould haul i he biggest loads. They 
got up to 8000 or «X)0 feet of logs, a good two 
carloa Is, at a haul, when I lieard of it and 
stopped them. But since then, and 
without letting me know, one of the 
teamsters has hauled down to bank 
a little oTer 11,000 leet, log scale. They were 
small logs and the measurement includes 
bark, slabs, sawdust and all, so they hauled a 
good deal more than 11,(J00 feet of 
lumber." 



Seems to hit the Investors and iMiard of edu- 
cation : 

U enry A. Ware. 
F. W Pain E 

R obert E. Denfeld. 
F.W.Bowman 
Jam K s T. Hale. 
Geo K ge Hupley. 
Wm. C. WhiTe. 

S. F. W adbams. 

Adolph Rudol P h 
Munger A- Mark E II. 

David A Duncan. 
S. M. Leste R 
Gridley & Mi S hier. 
Spencer & F O rbes. 
Lewis & Mc N air. 



Mr. Alma-Tadema, R. A., has painted 
a portrait in oils of Mr. Balfour, which 
will probably be seen at the Royal acad- 
emy next spring. 

Ex-Governor Ames will spend the 
remainder of the winter in Florida and 
the summer in Europe. 

The Shah, in addition to the jewels 
in the royal treasury, has a private for- 
tune stowed in vaults or elsewhere, 
which is known to consist of at least 
three millions sterling. To this he is 
perpetually adding fresh accumulations. 
The late Hon. Johnathan E. Sargent 
of Concord, N. H., left a bequest of 8500 
to the Centennial Home for the aged in 
that city. 

Dr. Talmage has cancelled all his 
engagements in London and in the 
provincial towns in consequence of the 
influenza. 

Jones Ordway, aged seventy-eight, 
now ill, presented the Young Men's 
Christian association of Glens Falls, N 
Y., with ?riO,000 cash. 

Gen. Butler has presented to the New 
Hampshire Historical society a valuable 
collection of books and pajiers relating 
to the enrly history of that state. 

The Rev. Sam Jones declares that he 
is not an alarmist; but he; adds, omir- 
ously, I know the year 1890 is going to 
be an epochal year, and some things 
ha\e gone just as far as they can go. 

Wore Mourning. 

Young Housewife — And now I want a 
couple of sad irons. 

Hardware dealer (producin^f the 
articles) -Yes 'm. Here they are. 

Young Housewife (innoceutly) — But 
are those really sad irons? 

Hardware dealer (assuringly)— Why, 
yes. Don't you see they are in black? 

BITS OF STATE NEWS- 



SCROFULA 



Is tha» faapurlty of the blood which princes 
unslgbtly lumps or swellings In the neckj 
which causes running sores on the arms, 
legs, or feet; which develops ulcers in the 
eyes, ears, or nose, often causing blindness or 
deafness; which Is the origin of pimples, can- 
cerous growths, or "humors;" Which, fasten- 
ing upon the lungs, causes consumption and 
death. It is the most ancient of all diseases, 
and very few persons are entirely free from it 

How Can 
It Be 



Doubtless a Slander. 

Barber Your scalp seems to be in 
perfect condition, but your hair is get- 
ting thinner all the time, in spite of 
everything I can do. I can't understand 
it. 

Regular Customer— I sometimes tell 
my wife 

Barber— You are a married man, sir? 

Regular Customer — I have my fourth 
wife. 

Barber (putting away his hair restora- 
tives)— You ought to have told me this 
before. 

FROM STATE EDITORS. 



The anniversary of Minnesota's admis- 
sion to statehood will be the date for a 
dinner and speeches under the auspices 
of the Sons of the American Revolution, 
a new society recently organized and 
with a growing membership. 

George Lawrence, <i lumberman was 
intoxicated in the Aitkin, Minn., dej)ot. 
J. E. Winslow, baggageman ordered him 
out, whereupon Lawrence attacked 
Winslow with a stove poker. During 
the melee Lawrence received injuries 
from which he died. The coroner exon- 
erated Winslow, finding that he acted in 
self defense. 

The railway postal route herettjfore 
running from Taylor, Minn., to Redfield, 
S. D., has been extended to Gettysburg, 
S. D. The line will be known as the 
Tracey and Gettysburg railway poet- 
office. 

Miss Anna Buresh, a domestic com- 
mitted suicide by drowing in a cistern 
yesterday. She was stxin to have been 
married, but for some reason the engage- 
ment was broken, which is supposed to 
have led to her self-destruction. She 
left two letters, one to her sister and 
another to Mrs. Kelly, the contents of 
which are unknown to the public. 



CURED 

By taking Hood's 8ar8ap.arina, which, by 
the remarkable cures it has accomplished, 
has proven itself to be a potent and peculiar 
medicine for tills disease. If you suSer from 
scrofula, try Hood's Sarsaparllla. 

"Every spring my wife and children have 
been troubled with scrofula, my little boy, 
three ychrs old, being a terrible sufferer. 
Last spring he was one mass of sores from 
hesd to feet. We all took Hood's Sarsaparilla, 
and all have been cured of the scrofula. My 
little boy is entirely free from sores, and all 
four of my children look bright and healthy." 
■W. B. Atherton, Passaic City, N. J. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Sold by all (Irujfgists. gl ; six for fi. I'repared onlj 
by C. I. HOOD A CO., Apothecarieg, Lowell, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



m m m. 



The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



/iMUSEMENTS. 



Alhof Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



REAL ESTATE. 




II lie Hi 



You Can All "Get There" 
You Try, so You ha i 
Better Try 



if 



TEMF>LE OPERA. 

DR. GEO. B. HAYCOCK. 



Manager 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



IChicatro Herald. J 

f'list now is the time when the averaire man 
JcK'ins to pro.-<p.-ttivcly nientiiUy plan, 
;■;» }i """ui' 'jwi'arlnir oil' season draws near. 
Of tlie leal he II turn over the first of the year. 
Everything that is wrong from his life lie'U 

eiface. 
And uauKht that's unjust In his tlioughuhave 

He's sure he has power all evil to shun 

When ho says so and so then the business Is 

done. 
Hut, in onler to have his new plan brolien In. 
Ho d l<etter not tarry a day to bcKln. 
And tis best he should not use the leaves too 

Whv not employ this year the leaf turned for 



FOR SALE: 

-$2, 



'd"» 



Preston Times: In the appointment 
of Dr. Fulton as a member of the board 
of directors of hospitals for the insane, 
(jrovernor Merriam has done the state 
go«xl service. Heretofore the l> Hrd has 
had no physician among its number, and 
was weak, although composed of gentle- 
men of ability and integrity. This will 
now be remedied. He is no politician, 
but a skilled physician, abreast with the 
times and will use his knowledge in 
reorganizing the asylum management 
and bring it up to the standard of tirst- 
class institutions. 

Kanabec County Times: There is only 
one way to get on in this world and that 
is to be honest. A dishonest man always 
collapses sooner or later. 

Verndale Journal: Eighteen years ago 
the State Historical society purchased 
a strip of land for iHjOO and it is now 
worth $50,000. This is a piece of good 
fortune which is of interest to "every 
citizen of Minnesota. Some liberal man 
should now give the society a sufficient 
amount to build a tire proof building. 

In the current issue ot the St. James 
Journal, Mrs. Chapman announces that 
for the present she will assume editorial 
control of that paper, so long ably edited 
by her late husband. St. James should 
stand by The Journal. 



The Weather Bulletin. 


Meteorological report received at Duluth 


Minn.. 8 a. m. Jan 21. 1890. 




PL.ACKg. jBar. 


Ther. 


Wind 


Kaln. Weather 


Duluth :».36 


-18 


W 


Cloudless 


Pt. Arthur.. 30. 1« 


-30 


W 


Ft cloudy 


Winnipeg.. 30.44 


-as 


NW 


ICIoudless 


St. Vincent 30.3» 


-:c 


W 


Cloudless 


Q'Appelle..i:J0.50 
Asslnib'ne .jSO.ax 


-38 


sw 


j Cloud loss 


-30 


E 


Cloudless 


Helena {iW.30 


•> 


W 


'Cloudless 


Huron.Dak.liW.ofi 


-34 


NW 


iCloudless 


St. Paul .... S).3!<-1« 


W 


'Cloudless 


U Crosse... 30.40 -13 


SW 


ICloudlcss 


Bismarck... 30.62-36 


NW 


Cloudle.os 


Moorhewl .. 3U.4H1-36 


NW 


Cloudless 



50-14--ln Icreage, - 
«-15--ln Icreaie 
Superior Street 
DocI: Property, - 



1, 

- IJ 



Lots for Sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



APPLY TO 



Chock Full of Seniie. 

Aberdeen News: Considering the 
junketing expedition of the North Da- 
kota legislature to the Pacific coast, at 
an expense of 6800 a day to the state, it 
is no wonder that Governor Miller was 
snubbed in his application forseed wheat 
to the needy settlers. If the state of 
North Dakota is so hard up as to default 
in the payment of interest, and is unable 
to give him guarantee to secure seed 
wheat, what shall be said of the wanton 
waste of public money by the legisla- 
ture':" 



T in rain column Indicates trace. One (1) 
inch of rain or melted snow eiiuais ten (10) in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (—) in temperature 
column indicates below zero. 

W. H. F.4LLON, 

Serireant Sternal Corps 

DuLCTH, Jan. 21.— Local forecast for 
hcenty-four hourn, ending 10 a. to. Jan. 
Jl: Stationary temperature, fair 
weather. 

Wa.shington, Jan. 21.— Foreco.sf for 
twenty-four Uoiirs, ending s a. m.' to- 
morrow: For Minnesota and Xorth 
and South Dakota: Generally fa ir, a 
slight rise in temperature, westerly 
icinds, l)ecoming variable. 



6 PER CENTI 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



LOANS 



MAOE AT 



6, 7 AND 8 PER CENT. 



Money on Hand. 

NO DELAY. 



JONES & BRACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



SPECIAL LIST 



— OF— 



We have at command unlimited 
amountiof money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Onimproved Pfopertj. 



BARGAINS 



C. E. 



OFFERED BY 

RICHARDSON. 



green 



THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 

Two aldermen are to Ije elected from the 
First ward, one for the long and one for the 
short term. Candidates will do well to bear in 
mind that it will be necessary when being 
nominated that the term for which they are 
running l>e desitrnated. 

* * * 

The name of H. W. Pearson was suggested 
by a correspondent of The Herald last nUht as 
mayor. It has created a deal of comment, 
almost entirely favorable. That Mr. Pearson, 
who has already served in the council, would 
be a good mayor, everyone seems to believe. 
It Is understood, too, that he is wiling to run 
if nominated next Friday, but that in no case 
would he make a move if 
nominee. 



"Our" Governor Had No Voice. 

Cloquet Pine Knot-Vidette: The 
President has appointed C. P. Johnson 
as collector at the port of Duluth. What 
ii the matter with St. Paul and Minne- 
apolis, has the supply of office seekers 
run out or wasn't the place worth striv- 
ing for? 

Jealousy Don't Pay. 

Superior Times: Duluth is to have a 
high school building to cost 8150,000. 
We might have one in Superior if there 
was not so much jealousy and hatred of 
the East End manifested by the West 
End. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTQAQE8 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT, 



mm & PRiiiDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 
Duluth National Bank Building, 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $62,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 1 50 

I Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best bargain offered now Is stock in the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E. RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 



On the Make. 

Effie's Brother— Do you love my sister 
Effie? 

Effie's Steady Company -Why, Willie, 
that is a queer question. Why do you 
want to know? 

Effie's Brother—She said last night 
she would give a dollar to know; and I'd 
like to scoop it in. 



the'the-a- 



Everybody SatlHfled. 

"Do you think your sister likes to 
have me come here, Jamey?" 

"You bet. You take her to 
ter and bring her candies." 

"I'm glad I can make her happy." 

"Yes, and the young feller what she's 
engaged Uj don't mind it either, for it 
saves him that much money toward 
going to housekeeping." 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



in J. 



not the regular 



* * • 

A Washingrton telegram on another page in 
regard to the lockl land office and charges 
against Mr. Maginnis, will give food for 
thought to a good many Duluthlans. 

• * * 

James Rooney of the sixth ward, tells a re- 
porter that The Herald Is mistaken In saying 
that he, James Roouey. was an applicant for 
first citizenship papers yesterday. "My 
father." said he, "was naturalized l>efore I be- 
came of age, and consequently I am an Amer- 
ican citizen without taking out naturalization 
papers." Now the fact Is a Herald reporter 
was In the room f the clerk of court yester- 



To Keal KHtate Men. 

Real estate owners and all others 
operating in Superior real estate sub- 
scribe to "Robert G. McDowell's Atlas 
of the City of Superior." 

Robert McFekran, 
Subscription Agent, 
327 West Superior street, Duluth. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War'' bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
1 he Herald Job Rooms. 

Smoke the End ion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Pootk & Co. 



DB,E.C.WESfl 

NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

f,'iT„'"d"'" «'"■ ."riV""'*' r>'«'"<"<".flls. Ncumlcin. Walco 
fune>s. Mental Ueprrssion. Koriei.iiiir of tlic llraili re 
","",'!;''.>'" "»^">>'l.» «nJ IcKiintrto misery .livav kn.l 
<leath. Pnmature Ol.l .\ge. Barrenn.-ss. I.ok.s uI row,. 
'»,f Lii*-''. •*•*• '"''o'""'.ary Losses, and 8perm,Tloiih<ra 
.aused hy overexertion of the tirnin. nelf-al.U'O ..' 
j» er-lnd,.lg^.jce^ Eac-li box contains one month's treat- 

l.„™?nX? '',°'^", '^"T ''" ''O""-"' "'" •■Pnd P"r.ta,si.r 

e.Z "rif^r-ntlll""* "".'""y. """' tr<-"tme'ntlaiiiw 
>:ure. Ouarontees issued ajiil kl-uiuju: sold only by 

- Boyco & Totman, Phoenix Drug Store, and 
.West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth 
Minn. 



6REAT ENGLISH REHEDT! 

Murray's Specific. 



"**• *''"*^ A Kuarantet cure for all ner 
vous disease ; such as Weak 
Memory, Leas Brain Power, 
Hysteria, Headache, Pain in the 
Hack, Nervous Prostration, 
Leucorrhoea, Universal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
tency and general loss "f power 
of till' (Generative Organs;— In 
_ . _ ,,- either sex, caused by Indlscre- 
M|i*1lkla<» tlon or overexertion, and which 
uaiiiiately lead to Premature TmJa 
Old Akc, Insanity and Consump- 
tion. Il.uu or a lx)x or six tK)xe8 
for 15.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of, price. Full particalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We Oaarantee Six 
Boxes to cure any case. For 
every 15.00 order received, we 
send six boxes, with a written, 
guarantee to refund the ™oneyWi|^»-C|— 
If our Specific docs not effect a cure Addrese 
■ Uoommunications to the sole manufacturem 
THK MUKHAY MKDlcmBCO 

80KI in Dnlath by ■fiSf^SS.*'"- 



COFFIN & WARNFII, 

30 FAKGUSSON BLiX^K. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-60- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 





W. C. SHERWOOD & CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE GENDINE BAHGAINB IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlflti parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask Is for lit rtles to examine ourllst and 

compare them rlth other pritjcs before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



J. D. & R. 0. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B," 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



R.C.GHIDLEY. J. C. MISHLRR 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Boom 86, Bxchaii^ Building. 
List your property with us at what it Is worth 
and we will soil It. We Invite everybody to 
call In and see us, and solicit correspondence 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year 1889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better," That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
arid you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $ 1 25 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be c'elight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones-— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 

Your real(ty) friends, 



C. E. LOKETT & CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg;. 



Two Ni[!hls of Meffiment 

MONMY AHD TUESDAY, 

JAN. 1^7 and 28. 

FU 8t appearance here of 

W. V^ TILLOTSON'S- 

Meffy Comedy Comp'f 

In the Now York success of two seasons, 



ZIG 



Presented witli the original cast, headed l)y 
the charm np soubrette, ANNA BOYD. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARG USSON BLOCK. 

OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



WANTS. FOB SALE. ETC 



ONE CENT A AORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertisements under this head received at 
the loUowiug places, besides tne business of- 
Uce of The Herald : 

Kudiou Pharmacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 
Uoyce & Totiuan, corner Fourth avenue 
and Superior street west. 

J. W. KelHou, No. lail. comer Eighteenth 
avenue west ana Superior street. 

D^uu?""*""' ^^^'"' ''■'•""'' ^'""'PS hotel. West 



Help Wanted. 

W'*f!'.Ji^?T-^iJ**'' -^*"' =* '*™'»ll family. In 
quire. .Bu East Second ^l^eet 

Lulled btates, being manufaJturv"rs"''a«ents 
represeutiUKOVer fifty ditfcrcnt luiesot 



ANTED- 



Sale Of seats Thursday, Jan. 23. 
in prices. 



advance 



PEOPLliS THEATER. 



DULUTH, 



JOHN 8. BARNES, Mgr. 



Ttie Best Vaietj Show in the Northwest 



This weelr, commencing JAN. 
MO RRISET & RICH'S 



20. 



AU-STAI] COMED! COMPAIiy 



ADMISSION: 

TO QALLERY. lOc; Pit, 25c; Orch.stra chairs, 
)6c; Boxes, 60c. 



Wul ajfcnts to leprescnt the 
"'1'^'-S'«U''<1 at all priucipaleui^ in thf 
Lm ted States, being: manufaJtuivrs^ 
represeutiiiKOVer fifty ditfcrcnt hues ot suiule 
andspecialties.troods and wares to be sold «,. 
the trade. Kneryclic workers who uau B-ivt. 
satisfactory bonds and advance sufficient 
money to cover costs ot acouiplcU> sample out- 
11; will Uud an excellent op|)ortunily to make 
money end have a permanent position. Ad- 
dress Oaldweli Commission Ckjmpany. aft Ran- 
dolph Street, Chicajfo, ill. 



WANT to— Competent ffiri for housework; 
one that can cook. Two in family. 
Apply Urowu Brothers, 19 West Superior 



WANTED- 
Ixiuis. 



Bell boys wanted at Hotel St. 



WANTED— A flrst-class German nurse kIfI. 
_ Address Koom aoK. Fhrst N alional bank. 

1 WISH to employ a few ladies on salary to 
take char^ of my business at their homes 
i^iifht, very tascinatinjf and iicaithlul. wS^ 
llo per week. iJetereuce trivcu. Good payior 
part time. Address with stamp, Mrs. MilrloS 
Walker, LouisviUe, Ky. 



WANTKD— A girl for jjeneral house work ; 
family of three. CaU In forenoon. 411 
Ninth avenue east. 



i^firi^f^*^^-**"u«*P«'»««« ^ advance. 
*^\J\J allowed each mouth. Steady em- 
piui uic.it at home or traveling. No soUciUnir. 
UuUes dellveriujj and making coUections. No 
IHJStal cards. Address with stamp. Hater Ai. 
Oo., pjqua. Ohio. 



Doors open a . 
at .S:30. 



7:30; performance oommences 



THE SPALDING, 



e. p. KMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictly First- Class in all tppointuients. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be fojnd a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christ an Science literature, with 
which the table It supplied and some one to 
answer questioni and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



\y^,^?.^,^~J!'."*fry pook. also other 



Inquire Phillips hotel. 



help. 



WANIED-At the Womaus Employment 
Bureau, ail superior street east, two 
secvnd girls and a dozen girls lor general 
house work. Employment obuilned free of 
cost. Airs. A. D. Ayei-s. 



tor .«MUe. 



CALE OF FUKNITLHE-Mr. E. T Hlley 
kJ being about to leave the city, wiU offer at 
i^iivatesale. at his residence. No. SH East 
Second street, upon Saturday, Jan. aSth from 
lU a. in to 6 |>. m., ail lus household lurmture 
carpets, kitcucu utensils, etc., etc 



|7>OU SALE— A heav}' working team chean 
< C at A. VV. Eilars Mi Lak e avenue south. 

Tj^OU SALE— House and lot on East Fifth 
JL2 street. First divUion. Lot 50x140. tououon 
<.asy terms, <J11 Pastoret-Stens-jn buUdiiig 



IjlOH SALE— Thoroughbred pedigreed Pug 
pups. Call at New Bodega, 2^ West Su- 



perior street. 



FOR SALE— Ix)t« 5 and (J In block 6, West 
End aduiUou. West Dulutli. tlUUO tor the 
t.o. These are bargains. Call ou Krlcksou 
at Strom, I'astoret-Stensou building, room 211 



GitK.ATFrencl remedy. Dr. LbDcc's per- 
iodical ri 1,1.8, rom Paris, France, actonly on 
the generative )rgan8 in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause), and all periodical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not be used during pregnancy. 
The large proportion of the ills to which ladles 
are subject is the direct result of a disordered 
and Irregular m?nstruatlon. Robt. Stevenson 
& Co., Chicago, 111., H. Boswarth & Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wholesale Agt«. The genuine only 
supplied by Boy ce& Totman. Sole Agts., Du- 
luth 



THREE 



IJ^OK SALE— My residence with 50 or lOo fc>et 
JU ai aii) East second street. Terms to suit 
purchaeer. E. A. Gilbert, XI Board ot Trade. 

Ij^UH SALE— Four lou In Portland addition 
; at I. uo each. ;;ii l'a»toret-Ste„bon buUd- 
iiig; also two lots on Central avenut. West 
Luiuih. These will be sold at a big bargaUi 
Call on Erickson 4; Strom, room 211, Pasturet- 
Sltfubon building. 



KhAV V HUKSES tXJK SALE-la head of 
heavy horses, raiscHl at Lake Park, on 
tne Northern Pacillc road, for sale oy C. W. 
Marvey. can Ihj seen at llowara barn, on the 
lake bhore, Minnesota poiui. Uesideucc, i£Si 
West Fourth street. 



IT^OK SAi.E— 24H acres of pine land on which 
X; there ls2,uotl,iAJO feet of pine. wiU be sold 
lor il»«u. A snap for somettody . 
•<51I, Pastoret-Sleuson building. 



CaU at room 



i^OH SALE -Two loU on W est Second street 
witb house. Price, «30,U00. . ErUksou & 
s..iom, room ::u, Parstorei-Stensoii building. 



ACREAGE 



Bargains 



Loiit. 

LOST— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
bliape of three rings. Lost in Superior 
or Duluth. Finder will receive reward by 
leaving tne same at my office. KolKjrt G . Mc- 
Dowell, liil West Sui>trior street. 



for iteob 

Tj^OH RENT— Desirable room; bath, gas, 
±2 sU'am,ctu.; private family. Address S.. 

Herald ollioe. 



WANTED -A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. 'J Phoenix block. 



lioard and Uooius. 



rpWO KOOMs, heated and lighted, with 
A. tioard. In a private family, *4 5o per week, 
li r'ourth avenue east. 

BOARD AND ROOMS furnished at 7J0 West 
First street. 



If taken at once. 



FlnanciaL 

DULUTH MORTGAGE LOAN COMPANY 
loans money In any amount on f umi- 
i lire, pianos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval from owner's i>ossessiou ; also on ware- 
house receipts, bank stock* and any property 
of value; notes disc-ountea; partial payments 
received and your own time grautod lor pay- 
went ; uo delay ; money on hand and furnished 
Immodlatcly alter security is approved. Wm. 
Uorkau, Manager, tioom 12, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Minn. 



IF YOU WISH TO SELL OR BtPT DULCTH 
or Su{)erior bank stock, corporation or In- 
vestment securities, call ou or address B. Mur- 
phiu, broker. 9 Banning block, Duluth. Minn. 



Land situated near 




L 




MISCELLANEOUS. 



"\r H. WILSON. ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
J3( • seller at Law. Will practice in State 
auu cni ted States Courts. All business given 

arompt attention, 44 Fargusson Block, Duluth. 
[inn. 

T3LA8TERING. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbinjr 
promptly attended to. Office, room D, Hun- 
ter block. 



"VTRS. J. 8. DINWOOD 



-THE. 



Greatest Snaps 



Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Sing- 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wlggins's, 16 Bast Su 
perlor street, and at residence, 131 Tenth ave. B 

TiTR. H, PARKER ROBINSON, 

VOCAL INSTRUCTION, 

8 MILES BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN & STEBBINS, ARCHITECTB 
and superintendents. Office, room No. 
— , Exchange building. 



PAL.MER 
Super 
ilui 



& HALL. ARCHITECTS AND 
8uperlnt«ndent«s.room 46, Bzchangie build- 
ing. Duluth. Minn. E. S. Palmer. L. P. Hall. 



In tlie nnarket. 



A[)DRESS 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



LA GRIPPE 



A Few Pointers. 



Persons who have a cold are much mora 
likely to Uke the influenza or so called la 
grippe. " 

a c 'rf'""*^'' ""*'^ severe when accompanied by 

The most critical time is when r«coverine 
from the disease, as slight exposure wlH often 
cause a relaose, and thtt Is .lmo.7 ,Sriun tS 
end in lung fever or pneumonia 

The feet should be kept dry and warm the 
^u^ c'othed and care usod to av^d ex* 

The bowels should be kept regular, and per 
•ons physically weak should Uke qulnrnrto 
keep up the vitality. 

n^'l^»J*'i*T*. P^=*"t'«>n» and a free use of 
Ohambarlaln's Cough Remedy a prompt r». 
f^l*'^ n '?«»0"«*'y cerUln. That ren^dy Is 
uneaualled for a sever* cold, and this dIseJuo 
requires precisely the same tr«atment. For 
• alebyBoyc* A Totman. 



f 





'L. 




jy* 



7 



M 



U i n, 




/ 



"» >. 




IT 

i 



> » e I 



axi_j.s 



-»» 




T^ 



T**- 



■44- 







r 

i 




t V 


t 

1 


^J 


) 







\ 



\ 





DUIiUTH EVENING HETIAM> JAIOJABY 21 1890. 



THE COMPANY'S STORY 



Troubles of the Gas and Water 

Company with Imperfect 

Work. 



The 



Cause of the late Num- 
erous Accidents and 
Breaks. 



What Superintendent Craig 

Has to Say on the 

Affair. 



In view of the number of breaks in 
the water pipes which have-been oocur- 
TiB^ with such alarraing frequency of 
late, readers of The Herald may be in- 
terested to know the why and wherefore 
from a water works point of view. 

Various opinions ;i8 to the cause of the 
trouble have l>een offered, the prevailing 
theory beinj; that water-hammer and 
frost were responsible. For the benefit 
of the inhabiUmts it may be well to give 
an idea of what is meant by water- 
hammer. It is a well known fact that 
for all practical purposes water may l>e 
conaideretl incompressible, the diminu- 
tion of volume for each atmos- 
phere of pressure being alx>iit 
tifty-one-millioifths of the whole. 
From this it will be seen that water pos- 
866868 no elasticity worth mentioning. 
It is when the volume of water is forced I 
through the pipes and imprisoned air is j 
6nct)unteretl that something has got to 
yield 6<.>mewhere. L'nder these circum- 
stances pipes are liable to burst at weak 
points. It is unnecessary to go into the 
reiisons of pipes being burstedon acoiunt 
of frost. 

Superintendent Craig was asked last 
nighi to give his version of the breaks 
before referred to. He said the bursting 
of the 2t'-inch main ou Bench street last 
week was because uf a flaw in the special 
casting. He refutes the idea of water- 
hammer l>eiag the cause of the breaks. 
Liasl summer there was more trouble 
frt>m this, as the water was pumped 
direct into the mains from the pump- 
house, and the pressure fluctuated any- 
where between thirty and fifty pounds. 
It will be remembered that this tluctua 
tion was comineuted on at the time by 
The Herald. Since the completion of 
the reservoir the water has been pumped 
to it through the "JO-inch main on New 
Vork avenue, and the entire city supply 
has come from there. The fiuctuation, 
the suj)erinteudent claims, has been very 
elight.not more t i 1 an fi ve pounds, since t he 
supply has come from the reservoir. Mr. 
Craig believes the trouble in every in- 
stance to have come from defective 
pipes. He took occasion to say that Du 
luth is not the only city where water 
pipes have burated. At Cleveland, Ohio, 
a flood from a bursteil main has lately 
damaged property to the extent of 
^JC',C\.iu. .Vside from t je inconvenience 
caused to parties whose water supply 
has been temporarily cut otf, the damage 
has been nominal, except that the water 
company is put to heavy expense repair- 
ing. 

It is but due the water company to 
say that every effort is being made to 
prevent the breaks, and make repairs 
as expeditiously as p<je8ible. The super- 
intendent hiis been out night and day 
for the past week, overseeing the repairs 
and is about used up. The water com- 
pany has received considerable "cuss- 
ing," which It undoubtedly richly mer- 
ited, but The Herald believes both sides 
should be heard, and this its explana- 
tion of the matter is given. It 
is singular that these breaks 
occur so frequently. It would 
indicate, if, as it is claimed, 
water-hammer or frost is not the cause, 
that pipes must be very defective. At 
any rate there have .been more breaks 
than there should have been. 



WE ST EN D. 

A Small Strike at th« Shipyard; A Fine 
Naw Bulldlne; >'ot«rt. 

There was a strike of small proportions 
at the shipyard yesterday. The men 
who heat bolts for the riveters thought 
the coal which they used was too poor 
and struck. There were only seven of 
them, but they threw out twenty-one 
others, ther« b«ing foiir men to each 
gang of riveters, and these could not 
work without the heaters. 

The Estey society will have a novel 
social next Friday evening at the read- 
ing room. It is called a "mum" social. 

Tonight a ladies' race will take place 
at the Parlor skating rink which prom- 
ises to be quite exciting. These who 
have entered are Misses Lester, Kenne- 
brook, McKee and Stevens. The French 
band will furnish music. 

Geo. Dewey, a Northern I'acific 
switchman had his hand caught between 
the bumpers of two cars yesterday. It 
was so badly crushed that two fingers 
had to be amputated. 

J. P. Larson will move the building 
which Mrs. Kigby now occupies as a 
fancy and notion store, upon his lot on 
First street, and will erect upon the 
vacated lot a fine double store business 
bl<x-k. 

A horse belonging to M. Deering of 
One<^ta ran into a street car near 
Eighteenth avenue, breaking one of the 
windows, cutting its head badly, and 
tipping over the cutter. It was thought 
at one time the horse would bleed to 
death. 

The Presbyterian church will hold a 
series of entertainments Feb. 3, 10 and 
17. The first will be a lecture by Rev. H. 
Mitchell of this city. 

C. J. Miller, \V. J. Glass and Miss M. 
Dale, all of St. Paul, are registered at the 
Clarenilon. 

H. C. Nelson, the Fifth ward alder- 
manic candidate, is down with the 
grip- 
James Kijot of White Bear Lake was 
a visit«;)r at the West End yesterday. 



PREPARING FOR TRAFFIC. 



TEMPLE OPERA NOTES. 



The Duluth and Iron 
Road Making Rea ly 
Business. 



Range 
for 



Council Delays the Public 

Library and Keeps 

Walks Icy. 



A STRONG PLEA. 



to the 



The Temperanre Lecturer ThIIih 
Cliurch Member. 

Mr. Burdick spoke last night at the 
First Methodist church. He appeared 
in this talk to the church member. He 
asked his hearers to throw off indiffer- 
enc-e and give personal effort to the 
cause of temperance. The temperance 
lecturer can do little toward reclaiming 
the drunkard unless supported. It is 
not what any one man, but what the 
Christian people say and do that will 
decide the result. Each one must do 
what he can. 

.Vt the conclusion of the talk a num- 
ber signed the ple<.1ge. Mr. Burdick has 
a distinct earnestness, and a heart that 
is overflowing with feeling. His voice, 
bis manner and his language all unite in 
bringing condiction. The meetings will 
be continued through the week. 



ON SWEDENBORGIANISM. 



A Lecture at the Itethel Tbi^« Evening; by 
a Well-Knona Spealcer. 
The Rev. J. S. David, Swedecborgian 
orator of Minneapolis, will lecture at 
Bethel chapel this evening, on "Proba- 
tion; Does it End at Death." He will 
treat of the heathen and others after 
death, ana will explain such terms as 
heaven, paradise, hades and hell, and 
give the origin of the Catholic and ( rreek 
purgatory. Questions will be called for 
and answered at the close. Lectures 
will be given also on Wednesday and 
Thursday evenings, and possibly Friday 
evening. They will commence at 7:30. 
Admission, free. 



A Fine Building. 

One of the finest buildings to go up 
on Superior street as soon as the frost is 
out of the ground will be a handsome 
structure to be built by the owners Cash 
Jk. Williams. C. P. Craig and J. D. Stry- 
ker, on the corner of Superior street and 
Third avenue west, recently bought by 
them. No definite plans as to the archi- 
tecture of the building fiave as yet been 
arrangeil. It will cover the whole lot 
cKJxllu feet and will be two or three sto- 
ries in height. Its cost will be about 
a35,0fX). 

SPORTING NOTES. 



Jack O'Brien has signed a contract as 
a first baseman of the Athletic club. He 
played behind the bat for the Athletics 
from 1878 to 1880. In 1887 he playtd 
with Brooklyn, and in 1888 with Balti- 
more. Last year he did not play ball. 

Mr. Choalt- referred to Ward as the 
Patti of the ball field. It was a pretty 
compliment to J(jhn, even though it was 
not so intended. 

Al Sialding, writing to The Boston 
Globe, says he feels couHdent of getting 
back a few of his old players before the 
next League meeting, Jan. 28. 

A Sar. Franci8«;o dispatch says that 
Ike Weir wants to make another match 
with Billy Murphy, and the latter has 
signified his wilhngneee to give the 
"Spider"' a seccmd chance. • 

The schedule meeting of the National 
league will be held in Cleveland in 
March. 

The National league will hold a special 
meeting at the Fifth Avenue hotel in 
New York city Jan. 28. 

At the meeting of the board of gover- 
nors of the Manhattan Athletic club last 
night, among those elected to member- 
ship was Caivin S. Brice, the newly- 
electetl senator from Ohio. 

Detroit and Baltimore have been left 
high and dry. Both are in quest of a 
paying league. They are played out ball 
cities and have to depend on outside 
cities to support tlieir teams. 

"What do I think of the Players' 
leaguer" said Harry Wright, in answer 
to a question. "Well, they are getting 
there, but I do not know how long they 
will stay there. Now, if all the clubs 
were as ably backed and as well officered 
as the club in Boston, the Brotherhood 
scheme would Ije an undoubted success. 
The men at the head of the Boston club 
have the capital and they have had the 
experience. They know all about base- 
ball." 



If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Boot &. Go.'b ad. 



April Juror*. 

The county commissioners yesterday 
prepared the following list of people 
subject to jury duty in April: 

GRAJin .ItTRORS. 

Duluth— K A Costcllo, P L Johnson. J N 
Riclioy. W F Davcy. J S Forwart. S W Hill. L 
Morritt, J H LK-lauey, S VanBiialon, Julius 
Howard. H S I'atterHoii. S K Wontworth. I. 
Frt-oen, R A Gray. Sam Loeb. K T Ltwis. An- 
ton (JtxiusftU. 1 F fleck. W A Kenm-dy. K E 
Kennedy, I Honily, t' 3 Allen, G <i Burnhani, 
F W Wieland. A W Bradley. M OBrien. L W 
Palmer, J H Unham, O A iivrg. O Sten.-<>ii. J T 
Bredeson. S C Miller. I) K Holston. Charles S 
Pierce. Perry Joues. F W La Salle, William 
Ball. C W Harvey, t' K Nonnainlv, l>uuif^ Beau- 
rivave. K H Uarri«, M B Harrison. Dunean 
.McKiuley, K D Mailett, L H Bendy, W H 
Burke. A K Macfarlane, J B Butchart, C H 
< ipiiel. S E Peachy. T A Pinto. A M Miller. D A 
Duucan. A L Oniean. West Duluth— S T 
Muies. E H Hall. KC Brophy, W Phillips. C A 
Everett. A C Olson, John Home, H P Smith, C 
J Birch, D Gilchrist. Fond du Lac-W S Hol- 
1^'ubeck. Hermaniown — I.amlKjrt Acker. 
Tower— P J Kiehwiue, P T Brownell. Kice 
Lake -Herman Baier. Sucker Kiver— \'oso 
Palmer. Ely- Sustav AsparKcn. Park Poiot 
K H Palmer. 

PETIT JURY. 

Duluth— P C Linden, Georjfe Brown, J F 
Daeey. L Kahu, Wm St Amour, A Mc-Comber. 
J t" Maniuis. J Kyan, E C HolUday. Fred 
Knarre. G Schelin, E V Brown, A BrauetlK-aui. 
.\ W Ehler, Fred Schumann. F A Day, J A 
Kedlach. K C Ray. O C Keitan. Emil Hiirtman. 
A Kingsred, O Kupley, J St Germain, S Samp- 
son. P Sorenson, W T Bailey, U W Saunders, 
Georjfe Lautenscblager. J Danauer, W H Boyle, 
GeoPK"' Robliiris. GeorKO Benuison, \Vm Nei- 
bit, M McOonald, A Snyder, L M Willcuts, L 
B Allen, John Birmingham, Kobert Fritz. A A 
Smith. M Perault, M Meagher, B F Smith. 
Alex Sang. James Peer, John (iustaveson. Pat 
Costello. Uscar Raymond. Byron Stewart, C 
M Johur,ou G H Prudden, G H Cannon, A -Mc- 
Farlauc. Jr. D A Butchart, H N Brown, T 
Tvedt. Gus Peterson, Emil Schmied, F L 
Biwze, W B Craiir, Fred Bayba, H Beior, M 
Corritcun, M Bain. West Duluth— A J Hand, 
D Forin,-M McDonald, W M Buffeii, G W 
Stevens. () L Olson, T Gordon H Kandall, John 
Wilcox, (inesen — Paul Lepaoh. Kice Lake- 
John Musolf. Hormantown— Gotileib Salz- 
mun. Fond du Lac Charles Peterson, M T 
Hulett. Tower— E E Barnidge, Victor Kahl- 
bressen. Ely— Edward Cram. 

Call for City Ueuiocratic Convention. 

The city democratic convention will be held 
in the council njom.n at the City Hall, Duluth. 
Minn., on Jan. 27, 1n91i, at - o'clock p. ni., for 
the purpose of placinif In nomination candi- 
dates for the following offices, viz: Mayor; 
two aldeniieu, first ward; one alderman. 
Second ward ; one aklerman. Third ward; one 
alderman. Fourth ward; one alderman. Fifth 
ward; one alderman. Sixth ward. 

All quuliflud electors who intend to vote for 
the democratic nominees at the coming city 
election are hereby notiUed that caucuses will 
be held betwe»jn the hours of a and S p. m , on 
Jan. •£!, IHW), to elect delegates to the city 
democratic convention. 

The following places have been designated, 
and each ward is entitled to the foUowiuK 
uuml>er of deletrates: 

First ward— ;J72 Lake avenue south, five dele- 
gates . 

Second ward- James McBeth's store, two 
delegates. 

Third ward— 135 East Superior street, ten 
delegates. 

Fourth ward— Office of Lehigh Coalcoiapauy, 
Merchants hotel, twelve delegates. 

Fifth ward— Dowlan'8 livery stable, seven 
delegates. 

Sixth ward— McKay's store, three delegates. 

One delegate for eiich fifty votes and major 
fraction cast for E. M. Wilson for governorand 
one at large for each ward has been I1xe<l as 
ttic basis oi representation, 

Chaklbs d'Aotremoit, 
Chairman City Committee. 



The Iron Range is making extensive 
preparations for handling the ore ton- 
nage of 1890, which will be 50 per cent 
greater than ever before. Tn© road bed 
has been strengthened anil the many 
cuts along the line have been widened, 
while the grades have been reduced. .\11 
the year the steam plow has been at 
work along the line, and large. gaugs of 
men have been employed. Large sums 
of money have also been and are being 
spent in bettering the condition of the 
rolling stock. Seven locomotives, 275 
ore cars and five cabooee cars have been 
lately purchased, uiaking the following 
amount of rolling stock now in use on 
the entire line: 750 ore cars, ,'J4 engines, 
300 flat cars, 80 box cars antl 11 passen- 
ger cars, a total of 1141 cars. 

Extensive improvements have been 
made at Two Harbors, A new yard has 
been built, and the ore docks capacity 
increased 7000 tons, making a total ca- 
pacity for handling at one time of 40,000 
tons against 35,000 for 188'J and 
25,000 tons for 1888. Last year 
at these docks al^out 8,'»0,(X)0 
tons of ore was handled, while from the 
outlook for this year, in view of the 
steadiness and upward tendency 
of pric«8 and firm and increas- 
ing market, it is probable 
that 50 per cent more, or at least 1,2."»0,- 
tXX) will be shipped over this line. Of the 
1500,000 expended during 188l>, 8250,000 
was put into rolling stock, and the rest 
into the road bed and yard improve- 
ments. This scheme of improvement 
will be carried through this year. If 
any new mines are opened beyond Ely 
the line will be extended to them. A 
road will be built to the Mailman mine 
on the Mesabi. 

This is one of the best equipped roads 
in the country," was what one of the 
prominent visiting railroad men said 
of the Duluth «fc Iron Range road last 
summer. In connection with the Ver- 
milion mines, and from the fact that 
the 119 miles of this road runs through 
a country that is Duluth's direct terri- 
tory, makes this line most imjwrtant to 
the business men of this city. 



AT THE 



Nat Goodwin was booked yesterday 
for Temple Opera for three days this sea- 
son. 

"The Dark Secret" will hold the boards 
at the Temple Feb. 1, 2 and 3. Ned Han- 
Ion, the ex -champion oarsman, is with 
the troupe, and is one of the drawing 
cards. The special features of the play 
are as good as were ever seen in Du- 
luth. The piece is of the melodramatic 
order. 

Manager Haycock has arranged for 
one solid month of light opera for the sum 
mer. The season will open July loth 
and close Aug. 15, .\ Baltimore com- 
pany will be the attraction, probably 
under the management of Carleton, of 
operatic fame. The company will have 
a repertoire of ten or twelve operas, and 
will sing at least two each weeli. This 
is the most important engagement ever 
booked in Duluth. 



HOW MANY m W[ HOW? 



More BookM and Cookery. 

The board of education met last night. 
A contract was let for a fire escape on 
the high school. Miss French was ap- 
pointed to teach cooking to the juve- 
niles at ^0 a month. Two bills from 
Campbell & Fitzgerald and Watterworth 
& Fee were ordered paid. The sum of 
$2(X) was appropriated to make additions 
to the high school library and encyclo- 
pa'dias were ordered for the Lincoln and 
Ailams. The ordering of $250 worth ,of 
books by the superintendent was raf- 
fled. The ventilation question was dis- 
cussed. 

That I'niucky Marquette Breakwater. 

The Marquette breakwater will be 
completed in about two months. Six 
weeks would see it finished if the 
weather held go<xl. Besides uncertain 
weather, on account of rotten timbers, 
considerable time is spent in securing 
safe anchorage. A new superstructure 
is deemed necessary, and plans for it are 
being prepared in Major Quinn's office, 
and a recommendation will be sent to 
congress. A breakwater from the light- 
house point is impracticable on account 
of deep water. The contemplated new 
structure would be built entirely of con- 
crete. 



CO UNCIL, 

The Public Library unil Snow Ordinance 
Itoth Knocked Out. 

At the council meeting last night the 
ball was opened by Acting Mayor Cos- 
tello who again presented the names of 
those he had appointed as public library- 
directors, as follows: Hon. J. D. En- 
sign, C. Poirier, Geo. Spencer. C. F. 
Johnson, Herman Berg, Hon. W. W. 
Billson, J. D. Ray, A. R. Macfarlane and 
Dr. Job. McAuliffe, the same names as 
presented by him last summer for the 
approval of the council, and rejected by 
them. Mr. Costello explained the rea- 
son for his not appointing sotue of the 
ladies who had donated books to the 
library, which was that it was not con- 
sidered best. and for divers 
other reasons. He selected 

the list with the idea of rep- 
resenting the different nationalities, and 
at the same time securing as intelligent 
a board as pt)88ible. The situation of the 
public library building would not come 
uj) for years. A motion to confirm the 
board app<jinted was lost. 

The board of public works reportetl an 
estimate in favor of Lungren & Johnson 
of ^13.J8.07, and that the burnt buildings 
at 102 and 104 West Superior street 
could not be removed at the expense of 
the property owners unless there was 
danger of their falling. Several delin- 
quent assessment rolls were reported and 
referretl. 

The Gas A; Water company gave 
notice of the assignment to the New 
Vork Central Trust ctjmpany of all their 
interest in amounts due or to be due on 
nydrant rentals from the city in payment 
of interest on the 8700,000 worth of (Jas 
& Water bonds held by them. A com- 
munication was received from the com 
missiouer of census asking the co-opera- 
tion of the city authorities in getting 
social and financial statistics of Duluth 
for the census. The matter of improv- 
ing Third alley from Fifth to Seventh 
east was referred to the board of works. 
An order for 821,712.89 was drawn in 
favor of McArthur Brothers. 

The Police Telephone and Signal com- 
pany's bill for 8:}"20 for putting in tele- 
phones was ordered pauL I. Freimuth 
was allowed 81200 for flood damages. 
An ordinance was referred granting the 
Duluth Street I^iilway company right to 
construct and operate an elevated incline 
road up Seventh avenue west. It also 
provides that plans of the proposed road 
are to be submitted to the board of 
public works. 

The committee reported it had con- 
ferred wit the city attorney in regard to 
the snow ordinance. Who stated the 
city had no authority to assess property 
to cover the expense of cleaning off 
walks, and that the committee had no 
report to make. Alderman Long, father 
of the ordinance presented a substitute 
resolution, compelling owners on Supe- 
rior street between Eight east and Eight 
west. Alderman Thomas claimed it was 
nonsense to talk about removing ice, 
and that it was imp<^)S8ible to do it. 
-Alderman Long retorted that he could 
clear his walks off and he thought the 
other alderman could do the same if 
they got up early enough, .\lderman 
Tliomas thought the city prisoners 
should do the work. Thomas did'nt 
think his brother alderman knew an ob- 
struction. "If a man piles bo.xes and 
barrels on the street you can arrest him; 
but when nature pours down rain, snow 
and sleet, who are you going to arrest. 
When the alderman talks of arresting 
Mllfr property owners he is off his base." 
A motion to lay on the table was carried. 



Desk room for rent cheap. Apply to 
A. M. Griffin & (Jp., First National bank 
building. 

Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

$583,a:i 
Will handle one of Thomas & Hendrick's 
5 acre lots on the hill, A rare bargain. 

L. J. Taussig, 

Phcenix block. 



If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



■Slutting Kace. 

There will be a race on skates at the 
West End Parl<jr rir.k. Twenty-firs* 
avenue west and Superior street, be- 
tween four young ladies. Misses Bertha 
Stevens, Annie McKee, Carrie Konne- 
brook and Mattie Lester, for a prize of 
85. This will be one of the finest skat 
ing races ever seen in Duluth, and 
everyone should try to be there and 
see it. 

The course will be ten laps around 
the rink, the race to take i)lace at 9 
o'clock sharp. The French band will 
furnish the music for the occasion. 
Come one, come all, and see it. 

Capt. S. C. Johnson, 
T. M. Ebiok.son, Manager. 

Proprietor, 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate fiBiahings at 
The Herald bindery. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for naking blank- 
books. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guesses 
Duluth. 



in 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; fronri Now to 

May. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth post<jnice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters,] 

The census of the United States will 
be taken this year under the direction of 
the government. Every city and town 
ship will be enumerated separately. 

There has always been great interest 
attached to the figures of p>opulation of 
Duluth. This will l>e especially the 
case this year, as the last government 
census gave us a total of H740 people, 
and it is almost certain that no city in 
the United States has ever shown such 
a percentage of growth as will Duluth. 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" isnioant 
the city proj)er. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
purposes parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will offer a 
prize to the person guessing the num- 
ber or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessor two 
cash prizes, 

llrNi Prize $.50 in Gold, .Second Prize $-in 
in (iold. 

(luesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



Popnlation Contest Coupon. 

My gueHS as to the number uf inhabitants 
in DuUith, West Duluth, Lakeside ami 
Ix!.stcr I'ark to be .shown by returns of tlio 
census enumerators in tlie summer of I»*0 
is as follows: 
Whole nuinlierof inhabitantii — 



Maine of guenner — 



IleHideniM of guesiier- 



Date, Jan. 21, 1800. 



Cut out this coupon, make your guess upon 
it and send it to The Daily Herald. All guesses 
must lie made on this coupon. Only one >r>it-'' 
allowe<l to a single couiM)n. In cn.se'thcre shall 
lie two or more r.nswcrsof the same numlH-r. 
which nunil)er is nearest or next to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winner slnll l>e. in either case, the one whose 
couiKin l)ears the earliest date. 

Address ail answers to 

"OUESs " care The Dally Herald. 
Duluth, Minn. 

Hay Serve an a Guide. 

In order to give data that is of interest and 
may Ih- of value. The Herald reprints the fol- 
lowing from the directory report ol IKSM, but 
it must l)e remembered that this pap<!r do«'S 
not vouch for tli'- accuracy of the opinions set 
forth or the ttgurq^ given: 

This volume t-ontuins '.i.'.HfJ more names than 
the last issue; a total of lfi.:tJII udult eitizeus of 
Duluth: this sum multiplied by:2li,the factor 
which has been fouixl to truthfully represent 
the women and chlldr»>n not included in the 
list, indicates a |K>pulation of Vi,VJ» for Du- 
luth. a gain of IU,<iik) inhabitants within a year, 
aii'l the predlctiou is ventured that if a lull 
complete and accurate count Ix? made 
IK-rienced and competent canvassers, 
•I(|,||JU souls will be found within the 
ratelimiUof Duluth in isito. 

Population by Years. 

1.*^, C'iiite<] States census. . , 

li^."), state census 

lw«l, dii {!ctory estimate 

I«s7, directory estimate 

Inns, directory estimate 

I*<», directory estimate 



by ex- 
nearly 
eorpo- 



:»,4T'i 
18,(JIIII 
22,(1011 
31,111111 
37,llll<» 
47,9<in 



.\ny kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



B 



R 



O 



WN 



R 



O 



T 




R 



S 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restauiants, 



—AND— 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We ar<> agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The B«*t In the World. 



Get our prices and von will be pei^ 
fectly Mtislled. 



18 West Superiof Street. 




R. KROJANKER, , 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty, f^" Good workm 1 1- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



209 East Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn, 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DDLDTH CLEARING HODSE ASSOCIATION. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
250.000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100,000 

26,000 



THE STORY OF A YEAR. 



rHOTOORAPH 
FROM LIFE 
TAKEN 
YEAR 




PHOTOQRArH 

FROM LIFE 

AS SHI 

NOW 



"Look on this picture and then on that." The 
above fac<« are exact repro<luction8 of photo- 
graphs taken from life of Mrs. Morton D. Har 
Ian, who resid(«s at No. (B West Z.'ith Street, New 
York f'ity. The first one was taken In Novem- 
ber. IfST. while in the Inst staKt-s of consump- 
tion, ahaniloned by physicians and nionrned i)V 
friends. The other was taken in I)ecen)l)er. 
188S. when completely recovered, and entirely 
through the use of Dr. Acker's English Remedy 
for Consiimption. The above pictures are wool! 
cuts, but they are true to life ami the original 
ph(it<^)cmphs. taken from life, can be Be«>n at all 
the dmg stores, Mrs, Harlan's consumption 
b«^gan as consumption usually does, with a 
cough in the monnnsr. raising of phlegm, tire<l 
and dei)rt>ssed fi-elhigs, a lack of npix-tite. the 
loss of Mesh and pains throughout the body. 
She did not realize her extreme danger until it 
becam<^ almost too late, but she is in perfect 
health to-day. Dr. Acker's Knglish Remedy 
for Consumption is sold bv nil rei>utable druK 
gists. I'ott can't afford to 6* vithout it. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 



WHITE BEAVER'S 

lEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

T. H. SPEMCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 



CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

RED CROSS DIAMOND BRAND. 
NaTt' ftiid aiwaj^ n-Ualilf. Lmdlm, 

a-'k hruKtrint for tHamond Brand. In 
red, mctallif; box.*, •<>mIM with blue- 
rit.i-ii. TaLr no other. .*n pllN ^ 
in powb^iiri U>iPM, pink wrapi***™. ar« 
daMfcroun countrrfclt*. Srnd 4«'. 
Mtmnii-") I'-T i-articulam, tentlmonlala and 
^'Uellef for l.itdle*,** in Utter, bj raiVTB 
nail. .Vjm^ I'lprr. 

ChUkwWr llieBi't U^ BftdkM Bf^ rUlfti,te 




Humphreys' 



Lib, 111 Mi'UKtvs'.Ni'Him .sarfbclcntinoall} and 
cnrefiilly prepared prcMTlplloiiH ; UM'd formally 
years la private practice with guccenii.and for over 
thirty years uneJ l)y tlic people. Every shiKle 8pe- 
clflcjs a Hpi'clal cure for the disenxe named. 

Tliese Speclllcs cure without druKKlUK. purg- 
lnKorre<luclnK the system, anil are In fact and 
deed the aoTereisn remedlesortlieH'orld. 



7 <'OE 

S Neil 

« Ilea 

10 ll>»| 



.'i^ 



UST fiF PRINCIfAI. SOS. CCBKS. V 

1 Keveri*, ( ondcstlon, loflanimatlnn .. 
3 \Vorin«. \V(.rm Fever. Worm CoUc 

3 rrjinK Colli', orTeethliiK of Infants 

4 l>inrrnea, of t lilldren or Adultw . . 

gllynentery. (irIplUK, HUlous Colic. . 
Cholern Morbuo. Vomiting 

lOKhM, ( ol'i, lirouchltls 

purHlirla, Toothache, Kaceache .. 

fleadiK hcH. Sick Ucodaclie, Vertigo 
l)i>pepHin. mUouH .stomach 

II ^•uppreNHedor I'alofal I'erlod*. 
\'i Whitmi too Prof use I'crlods 

I :i Croup, Cough, Ulfflcult lireathing - 

II !Hiiil Rheum, Eryhlixlas, Eruptions. 

\!i ItheumatiHiii, Khcanmtlc Pj,In° 

I H Kever anil \ ifue, < lillls, Mnlarlu. . . 

17 I'ilex, !'H".d or llUM'dIng 

1(1 Calarrb, iufluenra. Cold In the Head 
•in Whooping <'on|[h. Violent Coughs. 
'il 4;i'neriil Iteliilily, 1 nyslcal Weakness 

'i7 Kidney I>isenNP 

'IS Nervou'. I>ebilitr 

30 I rliiary WenkneiK, Wetting Bed. .30 
i'i Uiaeaaes or tlielleart. Palpitation 1.00 

Sold by PrugKl"!*. or gent postpaid on receipt 
•f price. I)B. Ill MfUKKV.s' JiAMti., (144 pages) 
richly Iviund in cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Bumphreyn'.MeinclneCo.IlibKultonSt. N Y. 

SPECI Fl CS. 




»t#« 



dSR on Best Set 
q) O . U U "of xeeth . 

CULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 



Koom 1-7, 40fl West Superior Street, 
FarguRson Ftliwl;. t>iililtfc 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Bref ery 

Is the larKest tn the State of Mlo teeota nu «iAr 
of the Twii Cltlei 



NEW HOTEL. 



-THI> 



[T 




St. Paul, Minn., 

<'or. 4th and WuNliinKton SUt. 

On Cable Car Line. Best Table lu the Nori^ 
wesL llaies triOOaud I'pwards. 

W U. Bjuiker. Manager. 



Moitgages Negotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 



Lowest rates for all sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowing- elsewhere In- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 

0nder First Nat. Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUIl DINQ. 



FIRE INSURANCE. 



GARWOOD'S 

Citj Tfansportation Preigtit and Express, 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



Tliiee Valuable and Nice-Lpg Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



DRAYS. 



Oflioe. 17 First Aveau© West. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 



17 First Avenue West. 



SCHILLING'S OeCHESTRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM 4U PASIOREI-SIENSOII RLOCK, 

DULUTH. - MINN. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every wav. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room fu town. Livery In 



eouueetlou. 



WILI lAM GRANT, Prop 



Open November I, 




L BE SOLD VERY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



"^ . 



Ihfee Good Building Lots on Nintli Street, 



Near Third avenue east 



Allthiiseare NAr^ell located and very accessible. 
Gc'Od schools and graded streets close by. 



A LOT 



-IN- 



BLOCK 12, 





MICHIGAN STREET, 



FOR SALE 



-AT- 



Below Market Pfice 



If taken at once. 



Apply by letter or in'person to 



"ED," 



c^fkieE :E3:Eie.j5^iLiD- 



CAUTION 



W. L. Doog'ias' name and the price 

are stainpcd on the bottom of all 5>noeP 

_ _ _ a(iverti!^i.-(l by him before leaving hit 

factory; this protects the wearers against high prices and inferior gtjode 
Ifvour dealer does not. keep the style or kind you want, or offers you shoes withou 
W. L. Douglas' name and price stamped on them, and savs they are just a 
good, do not be deceived thereby, but send direct to the Factory for you can ge 
whatyoi want by return mail, postage paid. Dealers make more profit on un- 
known slices that are not warranted by anybody; tli.'trefore do not be induced to 
buy shoes that have no reputation. Buy only those that have W. L. Doufflaj^ 
name an 1 the price stamped on the bottom, and you are sure to get full value for 
your mo ley. Thousands of dollars are saved annually in this country by the 
wearers of W. L. Douglas' Shoes. In ordering by mail state whether you 
want Congress, Button or Lace, London cap toe, plain French toe, or narrow cap 
toe, and ie sure to give size and width you wear. I can fit any foot that is not de- 
formed, us my shoes are made in a great variety of widths, sizes and half sizes. I 
guarantes a fit, prompt delivery and perfect satisfaction or money refunded upon 
return of the shoes in good condition. 



W. 




money 
DOITGLAS, Brockton, 



W. L. DOUGLAS 
83 S H O E oen^ISmcn. 

It) a fine HeamleM calf ahc>«, witli Doni^la 
tops and t>ak Leather bottom*. They are 
nia<ie in CnnKrt^HH, Itutton and I>a4^ on Lon- 
don Cap To*-, Narrow <;ap Toe, and Plain 
Frcnf'li Toi- Laiits, in iiiz<-« from 5 to 11, In- 
clndinK >>alf Nlzosand in all width'. If yon 
have Im;**!! payiiifr from SS to 96 for •ho«« 
of thiH finality do rotdo so lon^r. One pair 
wrill wi-ar hh lonK a* two i>airs of oonamon 
•hoea Hold )>>' ()<'Ml«-r» that are not muTanted 
hj the nianura<'turer. 

Our rIainiH for this aboe over all •Cher M 
•hoe* advortiM-d, arf : 
1st. It fHtntains l>cttrr niateriaL 

It in more Btyliah, better flttlnf and 

durable. 

It i;lv<-n better general aatl«factl— . 

It roKtu more money to make. 

1 1 sav<>H more money for the oonanmer. 

It in Kold by more diealers thronchouk 

the IT. 8. 

It's irreat uncoeaa la doe to merit. 

It cannot lie dupUeated bjr any f>ther 

manuf!«rtur*r. 

It Ih thu bt'dt in the world, and 

Inrgt'T demand tlian any 

■ho« advertlced. 



Sd. 

8d. 
4th. 
fitli. 
6th. 

7th. 
8th. 

9th. 



9B(000 ' vill b« paid to any pxruon who tvIII prove the altove statementa to be 

The F>ll<>win? Lines will l>« found to b« of the .Same Quality of *i»i«'> n wiril>i 



Lot sold next 
property for $335. 



this 



Address 



US., 



Po Steffi ce Box A A. 



85.CK) SHOE 
84.CK> SHOE 
$3.£;0 SHOE 

82.SiO SHOE 
$2.SI5 SHOE 

ttO /llO QUOP IS EQUAL TO 8HOE8 THAT COST PROM •» TO •S.SOli 

^^^■U'^^ €9^1^^M t)»e pair will wear loti)<;er tlian any shoe ever suld at the price. 
ftO C>0 fSUOE ***^ liOVS Ls the best School Shoe in the world. 

^d •9JS eU^P YOUTH'S SCHOOL, eives the small Boysi a chance to 

^9la # i^ On^#b the best shoes in the world. 
All mad e in Congress, Button and Lace. 



CIJNIINR H.4NU-KKWK.I>, which takes tiie plaoe of COS. 

toni-ma.lc shoes tliat cost from t7 to fi|> 

THK OKIOINAL AND ONLT HAND-SKWKD 'WELT 

l!K4 SllOiC. i^(|uals custum-made slioes costing irum f6 to ^ 
FOR rOLICEMKN. Railroad Men and Letter Carriers all 
wear thcri. ^^Inooth inf'ide as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. No Tacks 
.)r Wax Thread to hurt the feet. 

r.S UNEXCELLED FOR HEAVY WEAK. BMt Calf ShM 
for the price. 

WOKKI jrOM AN'S. Is the best in the worid for rough ' 

one pair ought to wear a man a year. 



W. L DOUGLAS $3 AND $2 SHOES 



Both Ladie 

"The ] 
Senile," < 
Also, Fre 

(,"onsun 
in the wor 
weaier. 



FOR 
LADIES. 

Shoes are made insi/esfroin i to?, including half sizes, and B, C, D, E and C£ width*. 
STYLES OF LADIES' SHOES, 
french Opera," "The SpitnUh Artrh Opera," "The American Contmon* 
The Medium Common-Seniic." All made in Button In the Latest Style*, 
ich 0|>era in Front Lace, on S3 Shoe only. 

ers should remember that W. L. DOUGLAS is the largest and only Shoe Manufacturer 
d, supplying shoes direct from factory, thugivinK all the middle-men's profits to the 

W. I« DOVCOJiS. Broiskton. ~~ 



FOR SALE BY SUFFEL&CO. 



0'. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Roiinis $10, S11 anil i12, Duluth Union Ibtiuoil Bank BuMng. 



-H 



I 



1 



^-^ 



i 






f 



-l-^- 



r 



I 



■< "rr^T 



•j^i im» .J. 



•^■^ "- *• 



-»*♦■ 



i 



^ '. ,, ^ W^0<m'~ 



--•»--•* '.w 



t mm m i ! B 



^ 



■4^ 



.t 



T 






^ 



mJJLXJTH BVBNIXG HEBAIiD: JA^^TJAKY 21, 1890. 



Election»of 
liarity 



Board, 
Chicago 
Quotations. 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



The market today op©ne«l somewhat 
grmer, tirst selling' }i up, but soon weak- 
ened and broke ^g on free selling. Trad- 
ing was yood, beine quit* active up to 
11:30. It was all confined to May. 
About noon the market became firmer 
and before the close kj of the decline 
bad been regained. This market, which 
followed closely on the decline, did not 
keep up on the up turn. At Chicago 
there were reported to be a good many 
buyers around 8i) for May, and efforts 
were made by parties here to buy there 
at that price, but were unable, being in- 
formed that that price had not been 
reacheti. In the face of this the board 
quotations were at 80 no less than eight 
times during the morning. 

Cash wheat was neglected all day and 
Xo. 1 hard closed at 78>3, No. 1 northern 
76, No. 2 northern 73, all nominal and 
the same as last night's close. January 
closed at 78^2. nominal, for No. 1 hard 
anil 76 for No. 1 northern. May wheat 
opened ig higher at S3,'2, weakened, and 
by 11:40 ^cas down to S2'g, sold up to 83 
and at the close was 83^8 bid. Sales 
were about AH),OCX) bu. May No. 1 
northern cloaed at SO's, nominal. 



Board of TrdUe l:.iection. 

The annual election of the Board of 
Trade took plaie today. There was only 
the regular ticket in the field and the 
vote ca^c was very small. The ticket 
elected was as follows: 

President. John Macleod; vice-presi- 
dent, Frank S. l);iggett; for directors (for 
3 years), .\. L). Thumson, A. K. Shepard, 
Ward Ames; for arbitration committee 

ifor 1 year), M. J. Forbes. O. C.Hartman, 
r. H. Smith; for aimmittee of appeals 
(for 1 year), F. A. Gooding, C. H. Graves, 
W. S. Birch; for inspection committee 
(for 1 year), George Rupley, CJeorge 
Spencer, G. G. Barnum, -\. Bailey, T. A. 
Olmsted. 



IMPROVE OHIO AVENUE. 

One of the First. Public Job* to be Done 
In 18»0. 

One of the first jobs of street work in 
the spring will be the opening of Eight- 
eenth avenue east, or Ohio avenue, 
which will be opened from the lake to 
Eighth street This avenue was ordered 
opened two years ago. It will be an 
expensive piece of work, as there is con- 
siderable rock excavation. The grades 
are somewhat steep, the heaviest being 
thirteen feet and the lightest seven. 

The street will be graded, graveled 
and stone gutters will be put in. A 
combined storm and sanitary sewer will 
be laid. From the lake, and for a block 
up the hill the sewer will be of concrete; 
the remainder will be vitrified pipe, laid 
in cement. The sidewalk will be eight 
feet in width with eight-foot grass plata. 

FATHER MATHEW CADETS. 

An lntere»tlnB Sessiu" "' the Abstinence 
Society. 
A regular meeting of the Father 
Mathew society was held last night. The 
bishop delivered an address on the evils 
of intemperance. A strong ladies' 
branch of the society was formed at the 
meeting. A committee consisting of 
Messrs. Hynee, Laux and Judd, was ap- 
pointed as delegates to a conference of 
the Catholic societies to be held on Jan. 
30. A committee of the ladies were ap- 
pointed to prepare a program for the 
next meeting. On Wednesday evening 
a meeting will be held to organizing the 
Father Mathew cadets, which will con- 
sist of boys under 16. 

Frobable Wlioleiuile tlousea. 

A Daluth firm of gentlemen's furnish- 
ing goods is making arrangements to go 
into the wholesale business. 

Negotiations are now pending between 
Duluth capitalists and a prominent 
Eastern business man for the establish- 
ment in this city of a wholesale dry 
goods house. Everything looks favor- 
able for such a concern opening business 
in Duluth within the next six months. 



FROM WEST OULUTH, 



This Year's Car Building at the 

Iron Car Company's 

Works. 



Notes of People and 
the Busy West 
Suburb. 



Events at 
End 



CITY BRIEFS. 



Chicago troftnip. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy. Wheeler Jc Lewis: 

Chicago, J. in. "Jl. — Wheat: The 
market was active and irregular. The 
opening was higher than last night, but 
met gotxl selling from prominent opera- 
tors, scalpers being the principal pur- 
chasers. The market broke to 80 on 
news of the shutting down of several 
large mills in consequence of the dull- 
ness of flour. The later re.iction was 
started by news of very small stocks at 
Odessa, and was continued by the cover- 
ing of small shorts who sold on the break 
to 80. It is not improbable that tomor- 
row's market may be somewhat higher, 
in which event we would advise short 
sales. 

The Daily Movement. 
Cars on track: Wheat, 18. Corn, 12. 
Receipts: Wheat. 5.911 bu; corn, 428'2 
bu; oats, 2(3,006 bu. Inspection: Wheat. 
No. 1 Northern, 18 oars; No. 2 north- 
ern, 2; corn, 7; oats, 17. Total, 44. Min 
neapolis reported 140 cars on track. Re- 
ceipts there, 81,200 bu. Shipments: 
Wheat. 26.100 bu; fiour, 11,555 bbls. 
Chicago cars on track: Wheat, 97; 
corn, 264; oats, 212. 



New Yorit ^tockst. 

The following are closing prices on ttie 
New York stock exchange as reported by 
W. W. Bill A Co.: 



Today. 

Chieagt), Burlington & Qulncy. 107 

American Cotton Oil 371£ 

Missouri Pacitlc 74 

Northern Pic'itlc preferred 744 

Cbicufiu, Milwaukee & St. Paul.. U8^ 

SuKar Trust 64H 

Gas Trust i6% 

Louiyviilo & Xashvllle m\ 

Chicag'o it Xorth western lioJ£ 

Kock Island 953^ 

Lake Shore .,,,,. il(^ 

KeadiuK 37*4 

Tenn. coal and iron tf5ji 

Kichmuod Terminal 21H 

Atchison 3114 

Delaware * Lackawanna 136J4 

New EuglanU 45 

LeadTrust ^0% 

Western i nlon 84i4 

Union PaclBc 66^ 

Wisconsin Central, 344 

OU ...' lorj 



Yester- 
day. 

njt54 

e»H 
53', 
4«! 

110^4 

*■):', 

1(MS 

86 

21 

31 

136 

45^, 
30 14 
M^i 

eb\ 

34'a 
107'/, 



The Minneapolis Cloae. 

JlijnTKAP<:)Lis, Jan. 21.-Clo9lnjf quotations— 
Wa 1 hard, January, 79; February, 79: 
May. S2; on trat^k, 74. No. 1 northern, 
January. S^; ieb. 7BH: May. -9%: on 
track. 77'a77vi. No. 2 nonheru, January, 73; 
February Td; May. 77^4:00 track, 7:%.7.i. 

Chicago Close. 

Chicago. Jan. 31 —1:15 p. m. close— Wheat 
steady: January, 7«: February, 7«'-i; May. tsO%. 
Com. steady; Januarv, ■J»\; February. 29'^: 
May. 31 .»^,. 



m., 14 
Mini- 



It is stated that a new G. A. R post is 
to be started in Duluth in a short time. 

Rev. P. A. Burdick will speak ' at the 
Methodist church tonight on temi)erance 
topics. 

A horse stuck its nose through the 
window of a passing street car today, 
and got it pretty well cut up. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Ijouis: 12 m., 
3 below; 3p. m.,0 below; 6 p. m., 3 
above; 10 p. m., 6 below; 7 a. m.. 16' 
below; 9 a. m., 18 below; 12 
below. Maximum, 30 above, 
mum, 18 below. Daily range, 21 \ 

At police court this morning James 
Mack was arraigned on the charge of 
abusive language preferred by Bryan 
O'Neal. Mack was found guilty and 
fined J12.50, which he paid. Martin 
Braker and Julius Marguart were a 
couple of drunks, the first named went 
up for seven days. Marguart paid his 
fine. 

Barber Johnson objects to the state- 
ment in a morning paper totlay that his 
youngest son and heir, born on the 18th 
Inst., had died of inanition. The young- 
ster is a pretty lively corpse, has come to 
stay and from his capacity for food 
won't die yet awhile. 

Andrew Petterson and Emma Pils- 
trom, John H. Davey and Clara Bellahee 
were this morning licensed to wed. 

Robert Williams was granted full citi- 
zenship papers this morning. 

Jos. Mayhew of Grand Marais has pre- 
sented C. S. Allen with a fine white 
faced owl, a fine specimen of the taxider- 
mist's art. 

The Apollo club will meet at Director 
Robinson's studio tomorrow night for 
the regular rehearsal. A full attendance 
is especially desirable. 

Governor Merriam will meet the di- 
rectors of the American Building & 
Loan asgiociation today, in the interests 
of the Duluth stockholders. The local 
committee is holding itself in readiness 
for an immediate summons to the meet- 
ing-K 

PERSONAL. 



THE DIS TRICT COURT. 

John Simaaoii<i on Trial for Murder: 
General Court Xutes. 

The second trial of John Simmons for 
the murder of David Cook at Tower, 
May .30, last year, commenced yesterday 
afternoon, and the work of filling the 
jury took until this morning. County 
Attorney Sherwood assisted by C. 
d'Autremont are conducting the prose- 
cution, and R. P. Edson has charge of the 
defense. The court was crowded with 
spectators. ThejuryisW. G. Cressv, 
W. B. Harrow, S. B. Green, John A. 
Noble, William Schultz, Edward John- 
son, J. B. Noyes, D. D. Jones, Angus 
Ferguson, W. F. Thompson, J. J. Wig- 
gins, John J. Crowley. Fifty-three 
names were called. 

The prosecution read the indictment 
charging Simmons with murder in the 
first degree. William McNeely was the 
first witness for the state and testified to 
seeing the shooting. W^ N. Shepard, 
mayor of Tower gave a long recital of 
facts subsequent to the murder. Mrs. 
Mary McCarthy who kept the boarding- 
house where Cook lived, electrified the 
courtroom by saying that Cook said at 
dinner that he expected Simmons would 
shoot him because he had threatened 
him. Attorney Ed8<jn jumped to his 
feet and objected to this testimony and 
the court ruled it out. Dr. Jamison 
testified to his examination of the 
wound. Samuel Owens, chief of 

gplice. testified to arresting 
immons. He also described and 
identified the revolver with which 
the deed was committed, and stated that 
Simmons surrendered. 

The state rested its direct case just 
before adjournment. The defense then 
outlined its supposetl testimony and in- 
troduced Chief Owens as first witness. 
Simons, the alleged murderer, was next 
placed upon the stand and at the time 
of gomg to press wa^ being rigidly cross- 
examined. 



We have a house of ten rooms, gooi] 
well and cistern, size of lot 5<^)xl50, on 
£<ast Second street, at a remarkable bar 
gain. To anyone wanting to buy a home 
this is your opportunity. 

D. IL Stfvenson 4 Co., 
43 Exchange building. 



Mr. J. A. Willard, the Mankato capi- 
talist is in the city. 

Mr. Louis McCullough, a Cloquet 
business man is at the Spalding. 

Mr. D. Buchanan returned from St. 
Paul this morning from a few days' 
business trip. 

Mr. E. W. Davy, a St. Paul commer- 
cial traveler, is visiting J. F. Langton at 
The Spalding. 

Mr. C. W. Brenizer left today for 
Washington to attend to some business 
in the patent office. 

Mr. Joseph S. Wood,aged 85,died at the 
residence of his son Capt. Alex. Wood, 
1727 Bench street, Sunday, of old age. 
The body was taken to his former home 
at Lancaster, Ont, by last evening's 
South Shore train. 

Mr. J. F. Gordon of Grordon & Henzey, 
will be married on the 29th inst at Fort 
Penn, Del. to Miss Mary Cleaver. They 
will come at once to Duluth and begin 
housekeeping at 314 Sixth avenue west. 

A train bearing Vice-President Car- 
penter, Capt. Sellwood, E. L. Coning of 
New York and J. Collete of Terra Haute, 
left last evening for Ely. The party 
spends today in Tower and Ely. 

Mr. J. O'Brien, editor of The Irish 
Standard, who has been in the city for 
some days, has returned to Minneapolis. 
It is said that Mr. O'Brien is contem- 
plating moving his plant to Duluth. 

Mrs. Milham. past president of the 
Womans Relief corps, department of 
Minnesota, will be here from Minneap- 
olis tomorrow to install the officers-elect 
of the Womans lielief corps of this city. 
.\t this meeting matters of considerable 
interest to members of the corps will be 
taken up and several important business 
matters disposed of. 

Register Keitume. 

At The Spalding: N. F. Valentine, 
Chicago; W. W. Smith, Milwaukee; S. 
L. Corning, F. H. Dowse, Joseph Ward- 
woln, G. Robinson, W. D. Lemmon, 
Charles Parker, R. D. Montgomery, E. 
D. NewgusB, New York; S. H. Hines, 
Cuml>erland; R. C. Ogilvie, Blue Earth 
City: W. C. Bennett, Holmes Agnew, T. 
J. Price, H. V. Price, H. P. Goodnow, St. 
Paul; S. Wolf, Philadelphia. 

At the St. Louis: H. B. Kenny, A. J. 
Fowler, Lake City; S. W. Browning, F. 
C. Beney, A. Harris, A. Goldmar, Minne- 
apalis; P. Cuddiley, Hancock, W. H. 
Butrick, St. Paul; C. B. Petrie, Ash- 
land. 

At the Merchants: T. C. Swenson, St. 
Paul: S. Stevenson, Vert-dale; E. Simp 
son. Tower; C. Ennis, Milwaukee; Geo. 
Jermain, Minneapolis; John Kerry, Bar- 
num. 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root &, Co.'s ad. 



in J. 



During the coming year the Iron Car 
company will manufacture something 
like 10,000 cars, one-third of which will 
be built at West Duluth. Last year the 
company turned out of its shops at 
Findlay, Ohio, and Hundington, Pa., 
7840 iron cars, but to about this number 
will now be added the product of the 
Duluth plant compared with what it 
must do for a large part of this year in 
order to turn out over 3000 cars the Du- 
luth shops are doing but little. When 
in full operation on the year's order it 
will be necessary to build ten cars a 
day, and this number will be largely in- 
creased later. 

Bids for the construction of the 150 
houses at West Duluth, which have 
frequently been referred to in The 
Herald, will be opened Saturday. O. G. 
Traphagen has drawn the plans and sub- 
mitted the specifications for the same. 

Michael Deering of Oneota, buried his 
2-year-old son yesterday. The little 
fellow was sick but a d*y or two and 
succumbed to the grip. 

Ij. Q. Jonie, the surveyor, will com- 
mence work on First street, Oneota, to- 
morrow, fixing grades preparatory to 
grading. 

J. A. Payne has been appointed ad- 
ministrator of the estate of O. C. King- 
Mrs. O. C. King will leave the latter 
part of the week for her old home at 
Grand Rapids, Mich. 

Mr. Smith, patentee of the gas regener- 
ators at tne Car works, will visit the 
works this week to look over the new 
furnaces. 

Three cars a day is the output at the 
works this week. 

J^ McKelvey, son of Judge McKelvev 
of St. Cloud, is employed in the otlice of 
C. H. Hoyt, the attorney. 

.\s8ignee Hoyt is selling out the stock 
of goods heretofore owned by Maegher 
& Kennedy. 

The Misses Sawyer will give a partv to 
their friends at their home on Friday 
evening. 

S. Moles, village recorder, says tnat he 
will not De a candidate for re-election. 

Paddy McDonald has finished his 
grading contract on the Belt Line road, 
and is now working a force of about 
sixty men on the Land company's docks 
at the foot of Main street. He has 
opened an office in the Manufacturers 
bank. 

Miss Ida Peterson of Minneapolis, is in 
town visiting friends. 

L. W. Spofford and John Finlayson 
will build an icehouse on their lots ad- 
joining the bay. 

The merchants of the town report a 
steady increase in business. This is due 
to the fact that the various industries of 
the place are rapidly increasing their 
rolls. About ."iOO men are at present em- 
ployed in the shops and at the new 
docks, distributed as follows: Car works. 
325; Iron Bay works, GO; West Duluth 
Manufacturing company, 55: Land com- 
pany's docks, tJO. 

J. Cochran, late manager of the West 
Duluth Manufacturing company, will 
probably move his family from' West 
Duluth in the spring. 

The schools, which were badly depleted 
by the grip, are rapidly filling up again, 
and the teachers are pleased to report 
that no deaths have occurred among 
their large families. 

-\ meeting of the Chemical Engine 
company will take place tomorrow after- 
noon in the office of Williamson <t Mc- 
Cormick. 

W. J. Holmes, Fergus Falls, was in 
town yesterday. 

President Boyd who has been confined 
to his house through illness for some 
time, is again out. 

T. J. Bryan, foreman of the machine 
shop at the Car works, has mastered the 
grip and is again on duty. 

Henry J. Garten of Pittsburg, is re- 
motleling and rebuilding several of the 
furnaces at the Car works. 

J. M. Home, of Home Bros., expects to 
leave shortly for Milwaukee on a busi- 
ness trip. 

See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. MaC'FAKLANK & ACSTIN. 



Around the Worltl. 

There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have ceaseu to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 25,0(X) miles as anytliing 
large. But dista".ce can be measured in 
another way— by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 miles 
in a single liner How much money they 
would cost? How many great cities anil 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigate. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent C., 
B. & N. R. R, ISt. Paul, Minn. 



WaMti "P Kffect iially. 
A lethargic, dormant condititon of the 
liver is hardly to be overcome with dras- 
tic catharti(!8 and nauseous cholagogues. 
A gentler, pleasanter and far more effect- 
ive means exists of arousing the organs 
when somnolent. This is Hostetter's 
Stomach Bitters, vouched for by the 
medical fraternity, tested by the public 
for many years. A resumption by the 
biliary organ of its secretive function, 
with the activity attendant upon health, 
a return to regularity of the bowels, and 
a renewal of digestion, are the no less 
happy and certain results of using the 
Bitters systematically. Its laxative 
effect is never painful and drenching, its 
tendency being rftther to perpetuate 
regularity than to produce a copious 
attion. Malaria, nervousness, debilitv, 
kidney troubles and neuralgia it sub- 
dues effectually. 



Monday, Jan. 27 

Is the day we begin to make PRICES sell 

FINE HATS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 



Rememberwe will sell 

THE VERY BEST GOODS 

AT 

THE VERY LOWEST PRICES. 



KILGORE & SIEWERT, 



Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 



St. Louis Hotel Block 



LOUIS LANA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 26 
West Superior street, has opened at 



28 WEST SUPERIOR ST., 



With a complete stock of 



Imported and Domestic Cigafs 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Fioe Cut aod Plug Tobaccos, Be. 



Don't forget the number, 



28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



LOUIS -:- LANA 



Robert G, McDowe 

327 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

GROUkD FLOOR. 

OPPOSITE ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 
Offers the following 

ACHES AND LOTS 



— IN- 



Highest of all in Leavening Power. — U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889. 




Baking 
Powder 



ABS01JUTEi:jr PURE 



SUPERIOR 



500 Acres at Haywood Sta- 
tion, on line of Omaha, with 
800,000 feet of pine, at $7 
per acre; one-half cash. 

280 Acres in sections 4 and 
5, tp. 47, at $ I 7 per acre. 
2 Lots on West Sixth street. 

10 " " Eighth " 

Block 7, West I 5th street. 
<< 1 " << '• 

Block on East 23d street; 
very cheap. 

I have a deal in acres that 
will take but S600, in which 
there is big money. Come and 
«e9 me. I have the exclusive 
sale of the above. 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern PaMslflc Short I.lne. 



DULUTH TO SUPERIOR. 



Except Sunday.. 
Exceiit Sunday. . 
Except Sunday. . 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . 



Leave 
Duluth 



6 30 am 

7 3o am 
iifi6 am 

to 00 am 

11 35 am 

1 10 pm 

216 pm 

3 25 pm 

3 30 pm 

4 00pni 

4 35 i)m 

5 40 pm 

6 46 pm 

7 15 pm 
9 2&pm 

U 10 pm 



Leave Arrive 
W. Sup'r Superior 



6 46 am 

7 56 am 
9 10 am 

10 15 am 

11 50 am 
128 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 46 pm 

4 16 pm 
4 50 pm 

6 66 pm 

7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 45 pm 

U27pm 



6 62 am 
8U2am 
9 17 am 

10 23 am 

11 57 am 

1 35 pm 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4*35 pni 

4 67 i)m 

6 02 pm 

7 07 pm 



115 8 pm 



SUPERIOR TO DULUTH. 



Leave ! Leave 
SuperloriW. Sup'r 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



-ANI>— 



INSURANCE 



Rooms 1 , 2, Exchange Rtdc. 



Daily 

Except Sunday. ., 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 
Except Sunday. ., 

Dally 

Daily , 

Oaily 

Except Sunday. .. 

Dally • 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Except Sunday. .. 



TOQam 



810 am 
9 25 am 
10 43 am 
1105 am 
12 35 pm 
1 45 pm 
8 60 pm 

4 05 pm 

5 05 pm 



610pm| 

7 30 pm 

1146 pm 



6 46 am 

7 07 am 
7 40 am 
817 am 
932 am 

10 66 am 

11 15 am 

12 42 pm 
1 52 |)m 

3 00 pm 

4 15 pm 
6 12 pm 
6 10 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1152 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

706 am 
7 23 am 

7 65 am 

8 35 am 

9 4»iam 
11 10 am 
11 30 am 

100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 15 pm 

4 30 pm 

5 30 pm 

6 25 pm 

6 36 pm 

7 46 pn^ 
1210 am 



St. Paul « Dulnth Railroad. 



Leave Duluth 

Arrive St. Paul... 
Ar Minneapolis.. 

Ar Stillwator 

Ar Milwaukee 

Ar CUlcag-o 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Ka nsas City.. . 

+Exc©pt Sunday 






GO 
Bo 

D M 



Pt 



800 am 

2 30 pm 
2fi6pm 

3 30 pm 

4 15 am 
7 CO am 

5 06 pm 
4 46 pm 



I 

of 



210 pm 
6|55pm 
7 20 pm 
7 06 pm 
6 46 am 
9 30 am 
5 06 pm 
4 46 pm 



55 

Is 



10 
6 

7 

7 

+7 

+t7 



00 pm 
66 am 
16 am 
00 am 
06 pm 
00 pm 
am 
45 am 



-to other points dally. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



l)uluth,{South Shore and Atlantic. 

Leaves Duluth dally 9 30pni 

Arrives Bepub''c, Mich 8 37 am 

Arrives lshp<>.aUag', Mich 72oati> 

Arrives Neffaunec, Mich 7 35 am 

Arrives Muniiiette, Mich 8 06 am 

Arrives .Sault Slo. Marie, Mich 1 36 pm 

Arrives Ottawa, Out 11 46 am 

Arrives Montreal, Que 3 30 pm 

Arrives Boston, Mass 8 30 am 

Ai riven New York, N.T 700am 

Arrives Detroit, Mich UlOam 




J^ 



J-tia/ ^^^ 



O 
O 

<* 
iB 

cc 

LU 
G 
QC 
O 

o 

co 

\- 
z 
< 

Q. 




CREJT SACIilFIK SIILE 

Will continue Fifteen Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no tigure. WE 
MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 
Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, '*The Greatest Sale 
of our Business ] jlxistence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, 
you would not s:op to read them, but will quote 
a few to give ycu an idea. 

$7.49 buys ar elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 6. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
v/orth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve. We must reduce 
our stock at lea;t $£5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild ^^reather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us I0 take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 

M. S. BURROWS & CO. 






o 
q 

10 

m 

cE 
lij 

D 
GC 

O 

O 

I- 

(O 
H 





PIONtER Py[L Cfl„ 



WEATHKR FORECAST. 

Jan. 21. —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours commencina 10 a.m. 
today: Fair weather; stationary tem- 
perature. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



COAL 


CROSS CREEK LEHICH, 

FREE BURNIIIC, 

ANTHRACIIE L BITUMINOUS. 


id s 

4 T: 


WOOD 


Dry Maple, 

Hard Mixed. 

Slabs, 

KdglDKH. 


COHIELLSyiLLE 
Aod £AS HOUSE. 


COKE 



mm PBOMPILK 0[Liy[B[D 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Oice: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Garfield Avenur, 
Rices Point. 



SPECIAL 



umm 



160 Acres in 9-49-16. 
80 " 9-49-15. 

40 " 1-49-16. 



320 

80 
48-16. 



" 35-48-16. 



Water Front, 



2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1760. 

' I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $2000 



REALTY SNAPS! 




NO SUCH 



BARGAINS 



J 





y 




Are to be found among 



h Real [state 




/ f 




- IN - W[ST - 




-AND THE 



EAST -:- END. 



Lots in West 



TFiat are unheard of bargains. 



Terms on Hnuses, 1-4 Casli, Balance 
U and 3 years at 8 Per Cent. 



H. P. MILLS. 



410 AND 411 FIRST lATIONAL BANK BUILOING. 



-4- 



■ 1^ I 



^ I II 'T ~ 



JOtI- Mil 



■Sttkk 



TX^STfr^C 




mtmm 



- 



f 



'i u : »-i >« !■ w ni M 



\ 







ACREAGE -;- 



That cannot be excelled by any agent in 

the city. 




• 




ACRES 


Near 


Short Line Park on railroad. 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 ;West Superior Street. 


1 




DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 





FOK BARGAINS 




— BKE— 


E. 


C. HOLLIDAY, 




326 W. Superior Street. 




HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILOINO. 



VOL. 



249. 



DULUTH, MINN., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 22, 1890. 



PBICE THBEE CENTS. 




■^^■^ 



GLASS BLOCK STORE. 



DULUTH, 



M:i]sr]sr, 



m m mm. sale 



Previous to stocktaking still going on. Extra- 
ordinary Bargains are being given in 
every department. 



25c [act) Childien'sUndeiweaF, 25c Each 

Your pick of 18 Dozen Children's Natural 
Wool, Sanitary Wool and Scarlet Wool Under- 
wear, worth 39c, 45c and 50c each. 

Take Ttiem lile They Last for 25c Each, 




89c Each Ladies' Underweai Only 89c 

31 Dozen Ladies' Sanitary and Fine Ber- 
lin Wool Underwear, Jersey Fitting, best firr- 
ished. Sold all over the city for $ 1 .25, $ 1 .35 
and $1 .39. 

OUR PRICE, 89 CENTS. 



$1 Each, Seal Caps Only $1 Each, 

From now until Feb. I we offer our entire 
stock of Ladies' and Gents' REAL SEAL CAPS, 
worth from Si 2.50 to S I 6.50, all at the uni- 
form price of $ I 0. 

Quality and Style Guaranteed. 



Ouf$2,50y.Glo¥e-EiltingCofset$1,25 

For this sale we offer our Glove-Fitting Cor- 
set, the G. B., in Cardinal, Blue, Black, Red, 
White and Pink. 

IIIISISIIGIGIIITICBmiTS1.25, Replaf Price, U 



ptfa ■ I . 



/ 






25c Per Pair. WOOL HOSE 25 Cents 

1000 pairs Ladies' Wool Hose, worth 
35, 39 and 45 cents. 

YOUR PICK for 25 Cents 



t 



$1 COMFORTERS $1 

For three days we offer 500 Comforters 

WORTH $1.50 Each for $ I 






50c 




Your pick of 32 pieces Dress Goods, 
all kinds, worth 75 to 90c. 

IILE ra UST ONLY 50CfllTSPEem 



S1,25 SHOES NOW $1.25 

Forthissale we offer 50 pair Misses' Dull 
Dongola Opera and Common Sense Lasts, 
slightly discolored, otherwise all right. 

REGULAR PRICE $2.25, now $1.25 



Come early and secure the bargains. 



PANTOH WmSON 



T 



— ^ 



W> .-i-JH-l-» 



-»* » ■ 



THOSE EEARFOL SNOWS. 



Trains Will Very Soon get 

Through the Snow-Bound 

Rockies. 



3 GIGANTIC BARGAINS 3 

FOR THURSDAY, FRIDAY AND SATURDAY. 



Many Great Herds of Cattle are 

Killed and Horses 

Lost. 



Nellie BIy's Trip to New York 

Changed Because of 

Snow. 



Sacramento, Cal., Jan. 22. — The chief 
train dispatcher on the Central Paoitic 
this morning reports the situation of 
that road as follows: "Favorable 
weather has enabled satisfactory pro- 
gress to be made at all points, and a 
great deal was accomplished. The road 
is now open from Sacremento to Towles, 
and an East-bound train will leave Sac- 
ramento at midnight. The road is also 
open from Prospect Cut, about live miles 
e.ist from Towles, to Truckee, with the 
exception of a piece about a mile and a 
half at Cascade, where snow sheds were 
burned last summer and have not been 
rebuilt. This section of a mile and a 
half has not been worked on at all. There 
are thus left two sections of live miles 
and a miU and a half respectively. 

It is mai y years since the far North- 
west has seen anything like the present 
fall of snow. Telegrams from mining 
superintendents m Eastern Oregon state 
that there are tifteen feet of snow on a 
level. Such a fall in mountains is not 
unusual, but the snow of the last few- 
days that has fallen all over (Jregon, 
Washington and Montana is almost un- 
precedented. 

The stockmen of Washington will be 
the hardest hit. They have been used 
to warm winters, and have made no pre- 
paration f jr anything like such an un- 
usual snow fall, and the extreme 
cold which came with it. One 
man in Washington has already 
lost 200tJ head of cattle. There will be 
some herds from which the owners will 
never market anything but bides. In 
eastern Oregon there were a great many 
herds of horses. These will suffer seri- 
ously, too. People who have never been 
in the mountains in the winter would 
hardly believe it {XMsible for such 
enormous quantities of snow to fall. 
Thirteen feet of snow in the mountains 
of eastern Oregon may seem like a pretty 
big story, but up in the Selkirks, in 
British Columbia, many men have 
known forty feet of snow on a dead level 
and drifts to any depth one had a mind 
to go. 



SPANKED A YOU NQ LOVER. 

A Funnv FHmily A Hair Takeit Place Out 
in Uelenit. 

Helena, Mont., Jan. 22. — Following 
closely on the heels of the sensational 
Hirschtield-Braden horse-whipping case, 
another episode of the same sort occurred 
yesterdav evening, the wielder of the 
lash in this case being Mrs. Mary Mc- 
iVlillan and the victim young George 
Crowell. The latter is only about 15 
years old and has been sparking the 15 
year-old daughter of Mrs. McMillan for 
some time. Friday the girl left home 
and after an anxious search the mother, 
who was unable to find her, sent for 
Crowell. On his appearance at the Mc 
Millan residence he was invited into tht 
parlor. The door was then locked by 
Mrs. McMillan and she proceeded to 
give Crowell a sound whipping. 

She then retired, leaving Crowell 
locked up, and telling him he would not 
be released until her daughter returned 
home. Today officers found the girl, 
who had been stopping with a friend 
fearing her mother's wrath. She was 
tiuully persuaded to go home and Cro- 
well was set at lit)erty. 

Crowell says the girl has been run- 
ning after him continually and he had 
nothing to do with her disappearance. 
Miss McMillan is now under lock and 
key, where her mother says she pro- 
poses to ke^p her for some time. 

MINERS AN D MINE LABORERS. 

For 



THE JUfiy 



NOW OUT. 



immons' Life in the Hands of 
Distf-ict Court 
Jury. 



the 



Other Cases Before Judges 

Stearns and Ensign 

Today. 



THE RACE mGAINST TIME. 



In 



Nellie Hly'ii Koute AcrooM Country 
New York Sunday. 

Dknvek, Colo., Jan. 22.— F. B. Semple, 
passenger agent of the Union Pacitic, 
received a telegram that Nellie Bly would 
arrive at Trinidad Thursday morning. 
There she will take a special train over 
the Union Pacific for Council Blutfs, 
via Denver. At Council Bluffs she takes 
the Northwestern for Chicago and at 

the latter place will be turned over to 
the Michigan Central for New York. 
This change, bringing her via Denver 
instead of going East on the Santa Fe 
from Trinidad, will delay her about ten 
hours. 

No Mails Throush. 

New York, Jan. 22. — Up to noon today 
no mail has been received from San 
Francisco here since the 19th inst. The 
Pittsburg mail was a couple of hours 
late. The Boston mail was an hour late. 
No mail has been received here today 
from any point west of the Mississippi 
except St. Louis. 



FEARFU L DEP RAVITY. 

A Twelve-y€Mu--ol<l Itoy Who Deliberately 
Killert Both Parents. 

De.s Moines, la., Jan. 22.^udge Hoyt 
of Clayton court, has today passed sent- 
ence upon probably the youngest life- 
convict ever sent up in this country. His 
name is John Wesley Elkins, and the 
offense charged was that of the murder 
of his father. He alB<} murdered his 
mother at the same time. 

He was indicted for both offenses, but 
as he pleaded guilty to the first, the 
other was not tried. The boy is only 12 
years old. 

On the night of July 17 he shot his 
father with a rilie while he was asleep, 
and seized a club, which he had placed 
conveniently near, and beat his mother's 
head to jelly. His infant sister, who was 
sleeping with his parents, he carefully 
washed and dressed and took in a buggy 
with him and started for his grand- 
father's. He was stopped on the way by 
neighbors, and when interrogated, told a 
story of the murder by unknown parties. 

He was not suspected at first, but his 
peculiar calmness led to his arrest, a 
week after. He confessed the crime, and 
gave as bis motive that be bad desired 
to leave home and shift for himself, but 
his parents had objected. He pleaded 
guilty of murder, and was given the full 
limit of the law. 

FOR IRRIGATION. 

M^jor Powell UrafU a BUI for Work on 
Arid Lands. 

Washington, Jan. 22.— The senate se- 
lected committiee on irrigation and re- 
clamation of arid lands had an extended 
session last evening to hear Maj. Powell, 
director of the United States geological 
survey. Maj. Powell made a long state- 
ment, during which he explained by map 
the area; of drainage of the arid regions, 
the artesian well district and lo<-alities, 
and at some length elucidated his ideas 
of irrigation. 

Maj. Powell read to the committee 
quite a lengthy bill drafted by him 
which provides for topographic and hy- 
drographic survey of the arid regions for 
segregation of the same into irrigable, 
pastural and timber lands, the two latter 
to remain the property of the people of 
the United States for use by the people 
of the irrigation districts. The bill pro- 
vides for federal control over interstate 
waters and the formation of water dis- 
tricts under the control of stiitee and 
territories. 



J. A. Boggs offers profitable invest- 
ments in Superior. This property will 
double in six months. 



To Ask For More Waees; Preparing 
an Immense Mtrike May 1. 

COL.U.MBU.S, Ohio, Jan. 22.— An import- 
ant convention of the National Progress 
ive Union of Miners and Mine Laborers 
opened here today, with John McBride 
presiding. It has been called to approve 
the agreement for the scale of wages 
which has been adopted by the exec- 
utive committees of the union and the 
National Trades assembly of the Knights 
of Lalx)r 135. It is known that this 
scale will be approved by the mine 
owners, and the outlook is for a strike 
on May 1, iu which, more than 100,000 
soft coal miners will parfteipate. 

It is also proposed at the present 
meeting, to unite tbe two organizations 
under one head to govern and protect 
the interests of the miners and mine 
laborers, the union, however, to be ef- 
fected without a sacrifice of the essen- 
tial features of either organization. The 
miners are already making arrangements 
to go out for a period of five months if 
necessary, in order to secure the increase 
of wages. 

NO POMP OR C EREMONY. 

The Uukeof Aosta !.■< Burled With .Simple 
Ceremonies hy His Own Kequest. 

London, Jan. 22. — No pomp or cere 
mqny marked the funeral ol the late 
Duke of Aosta today. In accordance 
with his express wish the ceremonies 
were of the simplest nature, even the 
usual military escort being dispensed 
with. The mourners, King Humbert, 
the Queen and their son, the wife and 
children of the deceased. Premier Crispi, 
and a few intimate friends. The re- 
mains were not embalmed, and after the 
plain religious service the casket wasde 
posited in the family tomb at Super^a. 

A SECOND STIN SON SUIT. 

■Six Brilliant Ashland .\len File Pre-emp- 
tion Claims Nearby. 

Ashland, Jan. 22. — This morning a 
sensational filing occurred in the land 
office. It was for secti<jn lio and half of 
section 3, which adjoins the city limits 
and is worth 8100,(JOO. There are six 
quarters and on this and six prominent 
young men of the city have filed pre- 
emption claims and are already at work 
building their claim shacks. They are 
Major H. H. Beaser, A. R. Osburn, A. L. 
Osburn, Peter Lamal, Frank K. Simar, 
and Luther R. Durfee. The matter will 
be fought vigorously. 

The land is owned by John H. Knight 
and the pine has be>en cut from it. It 
was deeded to him by the Wisconsin 
Central. It is claimed that the land is 
in confiicting grants of the Omaha in 
1856 and the Wisconsin Central in 18G4. 
There are over .300 applications in the 
local land office for similar lands, but 
the last case is the most important and 
has created a sensation. The six ap- 
l)lication8 were rejected and hearing set 
for Jan. 23. 

RAISING THE A RMOUR. 

She Will be in Detroit in Ten Day*; 
Other Marine News. 
Detroit, Mich., Jan. 22. — A day 
or two ago CapL James Reid, 
who is conducting the wrecking 
operations on tbe Armour, paid a visit 
to Detroit- He made the claim that 
with wjntinued favorable weather the 
wrecked vessel will be in the Detroit 
river within ten days. Last week the 
work of plugging her hatches was per- 
formed, and ai; present pumps are being 
placed, and in a few days her hold will 
be relieved of the water. The steamer 
will go into drydock at Detroit. When 
completed, the raising of the Armour 
will rank as one of the greatest pieces of 
wrecking ever accomplished on tbe lakes. 

Notes. 

Upon taking up the suit of the steamer 
C. J. Sheffield, against the Hill steamer 
North Star, Judge Brown will call up 
marine men to give advice as to the 
questions of fact. Harvey D. (Joulder 
and Henry H. Swan, of Detroit, are 
counsel for the owners of the ShefKeld, 
and Robert Rae and Charles Kremer of 
Chicago, for the Northern Steamship 
company. 

Capt. Thomas Wilford, who brought 
out the steamer J. H. Devereaux, will 
command the Cleveland Iron Mining 
company's new steamer. 

Capt. Allen, of the sunken steamer C. 
J. Sheffield, will command the magnifi- 
cent new steel steamer Castalia, built to 
replace the Sheffield. 

Dexter & Nobles, owners of the blast 
furnace at Elk Rapids will transport 
200,000 tons of iron ore from St. Ignace 
to Elk Rapids by tbe steambarge White 
Star. The ore will be moved at the rate 
of 40,000 tons annually. 

Merchant TallorH. 
Chicago, Jan. 22.^The sessions of the 
annual cjnvention of the Merchant 
Tailors National exchange were resumed 
this morning, nearly 200 delegates being 
present. Among the questions discussed 
was the unjust discrimination of the 
tariff law between manufactured gar- 
ments and piece goods; the matter of 
smuggling garments into this country 
by European tourists, and the relation 
of the exchange to the Journeymons 
labor unions. Tonight the convention 
will supplement its labors with a very 
elalxjrate banquet at the Palmer house. 

Mercliant Marine and Fisheries. 

Washington, Jan. 22. — The house 
committee on merchant marine and 
fisheries met in open session today and 
commenced the public hearings on the 
bills for subsidizing American vessels. 
A large number of persons interested 
will be heard. 



The examination of Simmons laste^l 
until late yesterday. Jack Hurley, a 
tough-looking citizen, testified briefly 
about troubles between Cook and Sim- 
mons. Bob Williams, a saloonkeeper, 
with a voice like a disabled foghorn, told 
the jury what he knew. Mrs. Clara 
Simmons, a sister-in-law of the defend- 
ant, told the story of her experience 
with Cook when he made improper over- 
tures to her, and how Cook was fired 
from his boardinghouse in consequence. 
The prosecution attempted to show that 
the witness and the defendant had been 
guilty of illicit intercourse. Barney 
Iveegan, testified briefly as to Simmons 
conduct. The defense reeted. 

Miss Jennie Sowders tried to testify 
through 1. M. Olson as interpreter, but 
the court ruled her out. County At- 
torney Sherwood closed his summing up 
at 10:17 o'clock after a strong plea for 
the state, during which he quoted from 
Shakespeare and was called down sharply 
by Judge Stearns for asserting that Mrs. 
Mike Simmons and the defendant had 
cohabited. The Judge called out "That's 
beyond all reason, and is unjust. Why, 
may have slept in the same room 



thev 



and yet not cohabited. It's often neces 
sary in small houses and small towns, 
and your statement is an insult to the 
witness. You must stop right there on 
that kind of argument. 

R. P. Edson, for the defense, made a 
stirring plea to the jury for justice to 
his client. Judge Stearns occupied 
twenty-four minutes in the charge. His 
remarks shut the jury from finding for 
murder in the first degree, but instructed 
that under the circumstances they must 
find him guilty of either murder in the 
second degree, manslaughter in the first, 
or acquit him. 

Mike Banack, indicted for selling liquor 
to minors, ent«red a plea of guilty. In 
Enright & Kelley vs. W. A. Wagner, the 
State Bank of Duluth garnishee, the 
answer of the defendant was withtlrawn 
and judgment was ordered for the plain- 
tiff for $445.42 with interest and costa 
In John Mailman vs. S. Wakelin judg- 
ment was entered in favor of tbe plain- 
tiff for the possession of the premises in 
dispute and for SlG.GOcosts and disburse- 
ments. 

The case of the state vs. T. R. Robin - 
sou, indicted for grand larceny, is now 
on trial, C. C. Cochrane appearing for the 
defense. 

Will Harrington has written a long 
letter to the county attorney, asking 
that he be sentenced at once. He also 
stat4>d that he was anxious to complete 
u.., uenteuce as soon as possible ho that 
he could show by his future life that he 
would become an honest and respectable 
citizen. He promised to use his earliest 
efforts to square up. He will receive 
credit for the time he has been in jail, 
but will be sentenced with the rest of 
the prisoners. 

Before Judge Ensign, the case ol J.W. 
Noren vs. Nortwestern Fuel company 
came up. It was an action brought for 
damages resulting from personal injuries. 
The original suit was for $9000 damages. 
The plaintiff was injured by a falling 
a>al bucket. A struck jury was called 
as follows: A. L. Warner, G. Mande- 
ville, C. E. Bostwick, A. E. Brown, D. G. 
Cutter, F. S. Daggett, T. Douse, R 
Fiebeger, C. W. Clarke, G. Spencer, A. 
Miles, G. V. J. Brown. The first juror 
named was fined $3.20 for contempt. The 
case will occupy all day. 



BEATS THE RECORD- 

Chicago Has the Wor»i Death List Known; 

Half Oue to Grip. 

Chicago, Jan. 22.— With the air filled 
with frost crystals and a stinging wind 
driving the thermometer down to zero, 
the health officers looked for a falling off 
in the daily number of deaths in the 
city, but when it came time to close 
their books last evening, there lay be- 
fore them i:W death certificates, an in- 
crease of eleven over the great record of 
the previous day, and two more than 
were recorded during the fateful day 
last week when the weather was almost 
as frigid as that of yesterday. 

The mortuary record for the past 
twenty-four hours exceeds anything of 
the kind in the winter history of the 
health oflice. It has but one striking 
parallel in the summer. In 1887 there 
were over 100 deaths from sunstroke in 
one week. 

These death certificates show a con- 
tinuance of malignant throat and pul- 
monary affectious, bronchitis is increas- 
ing among children, and influenza, which 
is growing more violent, is sweeping off 
people at tiie rate of twenty a day. 
Nearly one-half of the deaths recorded 
yesterday were due to throat and lung 
diseases. Pneumonia killed 17 persons, 
bronchitis 16, influenza 16 and consump- 
tion 12. 

A STO RMY V OYAGE 

For the Bill to Make a.'^eparate Appropria. 
tiou Tor the Sault. 
Washington, Jan. 22.— The proposed 
legislation for the improvement of the 
Sault canal is fast shaping itself. Sena- 
tor Davis' speech was, without doubt, 
the most effective that has l)een delivered 
upon any important commercial question 
this session. Mr. Davis is doing goo<l 
work for his bill in many other ways, 
and there will be no let up on his part 
until the bill becomes a law. Senator 
Washburn is accomplishing fully as 
much in a quiet way. He is using his 
persuasive powers in shaping the matter 
before the senate commerce committee. 
Favorable report will be made by this 
committee recommending that a Bj)ecial 
apjiropriation be made for the improve- 
ments. 

The Sault bill, however, may strike a 
serious snag in the lower house. Those 
here who have kept a close watch on the 
measure say that the house commerce 
committee will insist that all money 
voted for the measure be included iu 
the regular river and harbor bill. Those 
opj)08ed to a special appropriation argue 
that $700,000 already appropriated for 
the Sault canal improvements at previ- 
ous sessions still remains unused. Con 
gressman Snider has been hard at work 
on this matter ever since he came here, 
and the representatives of the new states 
west of Minnesota will be found voting 
for the measure, as will the greater 
uumljer in tlie Wisconsin delegation. 
There may be opposition in Iowa upon 
the separation of the appropriation of 
the Sault from the river and narbor bill. 
Congressman Henderson, who is chair- 
man of tlie committee on rivers and har- 
bors, is said to htive announced that he 
would not agree to a special appropria- 
tion. The Minnesota men, however, ex- 
pect to be able to explain a good many 
things when the proi)er time comes 
that will materially change the aspect of 
affairs. 



DEUDLY NATURAL GAS. 



House Demolished by the In- 
visible Agent; Several 
Killed. 



A Lighted Candle Ignites Gas; 

A Baby the Only one 

Unhurt. 



NOT BELIEVED THERE. 



the 



near 
in- 



PiTTSHURG, Jan. 22.— An explosion of 
natural gas alxiut 9:.30 o'clock this morn- 
ing comjiletely wrecked a three-story 
frame dwelling on Thirty -eighth 
Butler street, killing one person 
stantly ind seriously injuring eight 
others, two of whom may die. 

Their names are: Killed: John Slip, 
age ;i8 y >ars. Injured: Mn?. Theodore 
Ringer, aged 35 years, badly crushed and 
burned, will die; Annie, Benjamin, and 
Katie liinger, her children, aged re- 
spectively 3, 5 and 8 years, cut, burned 
and bruiiied, not dangerously; Mrs. John 
Slip, aged about 30 years, "slightly cut 
and bruited; Annie Slip, her daughter, 
dangerously burned, very serious; Mrs. 
Paul Melcher, aged 70 years, slightly 
bruised. 

The ex plosion was 
in the cellar. 
Mrs. R nger started dowa 
with a lighted candle. 



caused by a leak 
At half-past 9 
collar 
Before 



she reached the foot ol Jie stairb ii.o 
gas ignitod and a terrific explosion fol- 
lowed, wl ich shook all the buildings in 
the vicinity. The house was lifted from 
its foundations and blown to pieces. At 
the time , here were ten persons in the 
building, and all but an infant were 
more or loss injured. John Slip was the 
first man !rom the ruins. He was fright 
fully burned and mangled and uncon 
cious, djing at once after his rescue. 
Mrs. Rin?er was buried in the debris 
and was seriously burned. Mr. and Mrs 



London Financiers du Not Believe 
Bank Will Issue Mlver. 

London, Jan. 22.— Nothing has been 
published here m regard to the report 
that the Bank of England has recently 
been a heavy purchsiser of silver bullion 
and was contemplating the issue of £1 
notes, ledeemable in silver, hb soon as 
ihe necessary authority could be ob- 
tained. 

Careful inquiries in financial circles 
this morning resulted in showing that a 
few had heard of the report and they 
were incredulous as to its accuracy. 
The chief financial authorities expressed 
the opinion that the report was wholly 
without foundation in fact. They as- 
serted positively that the Bank of Eng- 
land had made no such purchase of bull- 
ion and was not buying silver now. 
Further than this they declared that 
purchases of silver were not being made 
by any London bank. 

With reference to the alleged inten- 
tion of the Bank of England to issue 
£1 notes, attention was drawn 
to the fact that neither 

the Bank of England or any other 
could issue ]>ouiid notes wilbout special 
authority by parliament. It was con- 
sidered doubtful whether so conserva- 
tive an institution as the Bank of Eng- 
land would be making preparations for 
so radical a departure from its history 
before definite authority had been 
secured. Silver bullion is one-eighth of 
a penny lower jjer ounce today. 



LOST WI TH AL L HANDS. 

An Iron Freight Mt-aiiiship I.ost on th« 
Atlantic. 

London, Jan. 22.— The National line 
steamer Erin, Capt. Tyson, from New 
York for London, has now been out 
twenty-five days, and there is hardly any 
doubt in maritime circles that some dis- 
aster has befallen her. 

The fears concerning her safety have 
been greatly augmented by a "report 
made by the British steamer Creole, 
Ca]>t. Darling, at Bremen from New 
Orleans, which on Jan. 9 saw a steamer's 
lifeboat adrift bearing the name Erin. 
The Creole brought a boat alongside and 
took from it ten ash oars, a mast and 
sail, lifebuoy. The steamer's bridge 



Mekher, in jiged couple, were asleep on ' *'^'' awning were also seen floating near 
the third fioor, and were buried in the ' f^^® lifeboat. The Erin was a bark rigged 



Pamell's Times Action. 

London, Jan. 22.— The trial of the 
action brought by Mr. Parnell against 
The Times for libel has been fixed for 
Feb. 3. 



A Fermented Wine for Sacrament. 

Pierre, S. D., Jan. 22.— A petition of 
Bishop W. H. Hare of Sioux Falls, head 
of the Episcopal church in Dakota, pre- 
sented to the legislature caused consider- 
able excitement, especially among pro- 
hibitionists. He emphatically protests 
against the adoption of the prohibition 
bill now Ijefore the legislature, that has 
every prospect of becoming a law, stat- 
ing that it is too stringent in its pro- 
visions. Bishop Hare says the bill even 
interferes between state and church, be- 
cause it prohibits the use of wine for 
sacramental purposes. 

Weddini: in High Circles. 

New York, Jan 22.— The marriage of 
Baron S. Alfred von Op|)enheiin of Lon- 
don, and Miss Adele Hutchins of New 
York, was solemnized yesterday at St. 
Mary Abbotts church at Kensington. 
The baron has been one of the wealth- 
iest and best-known of London bache- 
lors, and the bride is the daughter of 
Mr. and Mrs. Parkinson Sharp. Mrs. 
Sharp before her second marriage was 
Mrs. Hutchins of New York, where she 
has a large number of relations and 
friends. 

Murderer Recaptured. 

Ro€H ESTER, N. Y., Jan. 22.— The Ger- 
man murderer, Michael Schieber, who 
escaped from a Minneapolis detective 
from Central train at Corfu yesterday, 
was captured a few miles from the place 
where he jumped last evening. He was 
not injured and had in his possession a 
revolver of German make. He was at a 
farm house, warming himself by the fire 
when recaptured. 

The Way It Works Here, Too. 
Pall, River, Mass., Jan. 22. — The 
managers of a number of big mills here 
have been watching the result of the 
profit sharing experiment at Bourne mill, 
and it is stated on good authority that a 
number of mills contemplate doing like- 
wise, for the incentive offered keeps the 
help from leaving, and evil with which 
every large mill has had to contend. 

No Conclusion. 

Washinoton, Jan. 22. — The sub-com- 
mittee of the special house committee on 
the World's fair discussed the Springer 
proposition to select a site. The sub- 
committee was hopelessly divided upon 
the proposition and it will report that it 
has (x>me to no conclusion thereon. 



A Naval Addition. 

PROvinENCE, R. I., Jan. 22.— The 
launching of the new torpedo boat Gush- 
ing to have occurred today at Bristol, is 
postponed on account of very high winds. 
All preparations are completed, and the 
launching will doubtless occur tomorrow 
if the wind mo<lerates. 

Stood everything But the Orlp. 

Amesbury. Mass., Jan. 22. — Mrs. Polly 
Osgood, who celebrated her 100th birth- 
day Jan. 10, died last night of iuffuenza. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



ALWAYS_GETS OUT. 

A Notorious »\ lot-uufiu ciriuiiuat \> ho 
Al\Tays K84!apes £a*ily. 

Joliet, 111., Jan. 22.— Frank Dutcher, 
the noteil burglar and thief, well known 
throughout northern Illinois and Wis- 
consin, was returned to Joliet prison to- 
day for his fourth term. The peculiar 
record of this criminal has no parallel 
amons: any of the criminal or insane re- 
corded at the prison. 

Dutcher was sent to Waupun prison 
for four years in 1878, convicted of bur- 
k'lary; was transferred from Waupun to 
the Wisconsin insane asylum in 1880, 
from whence he shortly 6scai)ed. In 
December, 1881, he turned up at Morri- 
son, 111., committed burglary, and was 
sent here for two years. He was trans 
ferred to Elgin asylum July 17, 1882, and 
the warden here was notified a month 
later that Dutcher had escaped. 
In Feb., 1883, he was arrested at Rock- 
ford for burglary and sent here for two 
years. In October he was again trans- 
ferred to Elgin, but only remained in the 
asylum eight days, when he again es- 
caped. In January, 1884, he was ar- 
rested at Woodstock, 111., on two charges 
of burglary, and sent back here for his 
third term, three years' sentence, only to 
be again transferred to Elgin a third 
time, and nine days later he made his 
escape. 

Yesterday he came in again from a 
year at Woodstock, and as he undoubt- 
edly is insane it will be but a short time 
before he is again sent to the asylum. 

Dutcher has been sent here four dif- 
ferent times and has never completed a 
sentence. 

Probably a Ghastly Fake. 

Jackson viLXJi, 111., Jan. 22.— The 
stories put afloat about the asylum for 
the blind, that pupils are subjected to 
corporal punishment and poorly clothed 
and fed, are scouted by people in charge 
of the institution. Superintendent 
Phillips says the charges made against 
the management are not worthy of 
notice. "I have nothing to conceal," he 
said today. "Go among pupils yourself, 
and talk to them privately. Nobody 
shall interfere with you." Several of 
the boys A'sre questioned in private, as 
suggested by the superintendent, and 
all denied that they had been ill used. 

A PoHtmaster Robbed the Mails. 

Shiocton, Wis., Jan. 22. — [Special.]— 
Postmaster Dearling, postmaster at this 
pla(«, was arrested late last evening 
charged with robbing the United States 
mails. For a long time mail has been 
missed .here, and finally the matter was 
placed in charge of Chief Inspector 
Stuart of Chicago, who soon succeeded 
in finding the criminal. 

sickly Sentlmeotality Toward Women. 

Harrisbuko, Pa,. Jan. 22. — The Ijoard 
of pardons has recommended the com- 
mutation of the death sentence in the 
case of Mrs. Margaret A. Dilliard of 
Northampton county, under sentence of 
death. Mrs. Dilliard conspired with 
her paramour to murder her husband. 

REAL ESTATE. 



in 
debris. The old lady's injuries are seri- 
ous. An infant belonging to Mrs. Slip 
was taker from the ruins uninjured. It 
was nestling in its cradle and had not 
received £ scratch. 

Information just received is to the 
effect tha , Mrs. Ringer's children were 
more seriously injured than at first re- 
ported, '"hey are all in a critical con- 
dition anc mav not recover. The loss 
will be abDut $.3000. 



9 i'OO 
tiOU 



A Record of the Real Kstate Transfers for 
'^4 Hours, Ending at Noon. 

E K Jofferson to N A Uearhart, lots i:*), 
i;i2, VM, Minnesota avenue. Lower Du- 
luth.. 

Jas A Munnh(.*lm to E K JelTorson, lots 
i:*) and l.fcJ, Minnesota aven ic 

C Hanson to J D Strylier, si^i of nw'4, 
3S-t9-15 10,000 

A C Oti.« to J H Kurtzman, cH of sW* 
uiKlswi^of sw>4. ;t(Kili-15 2,4<I0 

William McKlnley to E C Holllday, eV, 
and sw'4 of sw^, Mx;tlon 'H, and nH 
of BW'i, 2.^50-16 1,800 

Churles Hanson to H F Edson, w% of 
uwi^, SMi^-lfi 4,000 

C A Turnlnir to J H Nonlby. lot 14, 
block 13, F!piiidlng8 addition 

West Duluth Land company to Andrew 
Llnsted. lot ». block 100, West Duluth, 
Second 

Same to D A Duncan, lot .3, block 73, 
Second 

T O Hobe to H C Laindsverk, lot 8, 
block 94, Fourth 

O Erii'kson to G Carlson, lot 7 in block 
IH, Stcwartt< addition t^) West Duluth. 

lltransfcrfl: couaideratlou t^0,910 



IM 



3G0 
900 
626 
4% 



Sons ol the Revolution. 

Chicago, Jan. 22. -The newly-organ- 
ized Illicois Chapter of Sons of the 
American Revolution held its first regu- 
lar meeticg this afternoon. There were 
present many well-known men, who have 
hunted t irough the records and dis 
covered tl at their ancestf rs were heart 
and soul fir liberty iu the days of '7G. 
(i Ml. Oeor^e Crook occupied the chair- 
man's place, and Dr. G. B. Abbott acted 
as temper iry secretary. Bishop Cheny 
and Capt. Robbins brought in a consti- 
tution anc set of by laws, and their re- 
port wiis received and adopted. Gen. 
Crook was elected j)resident for the en- 
suing yeai. 

No C ^ance to Sell ICum or Rifles. 
Paris, Jan. 22. — Advices received here 
state that Capt. Trvior, the French ex- 
l)lorer who recently crossed from the 
west to tha east cosist of Africa, is of the 
opinion that no commercial ventures 
are yossible in those portions of the 
country tl rough which he traveled. 



iron screw steamer of 2190 net and 4500 
gross loas. She carried no passengers, 
but had a crew of sixty or seventy men 
and about fifteen cattlemen. 



^In the Senate. 

Wa-shington, Jan. 22-— Among senate 
bills reported and placed on the calen- 
dar w as one increasing to 82,.')00 per year 
the pension now allowed to the widow of 
Gen. Judson S. Kilpatrick. Mr. Chand- 
ler offered a concurrent resolution 
authorizing committees on immigra- 
tion in the two houses to 
investigate the working of the various 
laws of the United States and of the 
several states in regard to immigration 
from foreign countries (especially law of 
congress of Aug. 3, 1882) and also to in- 
vestigate the workings of contracts made 
by the secretary of the treasury under 
that law with the various state com- 
missions, boards and officers. 



THE MINSTRELS. 



The 



of the 



Ihe .Sault in the Honite. 

Washin !Ton, Jan. 22. — In the house 

Mr. Burr>w8, Michigan, introduced a 

bill for thd improvement of St. Marys 

river and Hay Lake channel; referred. 



Mr. Conger, Iowa, 
making Dos Moines 
referred. 



introduced a bill 
a port of delivery; 



Forthcomini; Performance 
Duluth IMusical Club. 

A minstrel show, partaking of the 
same general features of the one given last 
year by the Minstrel club, is on the tapis. 
Tbe affair is under the management of 
W. II. Wilson, which is a sullicient guar- 
antee the affair will be a success. 

Some of the Ijest musicians and 
sjiecialty artists in the city have 
promised their aid. It will be given for 
the benefit of some charitable institu- 
tion of the city. The plans of the club 
are not fully matured, but will be pub- 
lished in The Herald as soon as fully de- 
cided upon. 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



-!- CHEAP - ACRES -i- 



NEXT TO LAND THAT WILL BE 



Platted This Spring 




IIAM C, SARGENT. 



REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bargains 1 Snaps. 

L 00 Acres In 4.50; I 4, 25 percent below the 
market. 
200 iXcres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on the hill below 
the market. 

2 Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on uasy ternns. 

A few desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash pay- 
ment, if improved. 

J. M. ROOT 8c CO., 

Room 0, Metropolitan Block. 



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DVLirrn ^T^ENIKG ILERJLLDi JAJSVAUY 22, 1890. 



EVEyiyg herald. 

ELIOT LORD. Publisher. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subicrlptlon Rates: 

Daily. by mail, per year •J"Sn 

Dally, by mall, per three moatba »■"" 

Dally, by mail, p«r one month '" 

IN THIS CITY. 

Dally, by carrier, per week '^ 

Entered at the postofBce at Duluth, Mlna.. aa 
second-class mall matter. 

er^he Washlngrton office ot The Herald Is 
at Ua* New Vork avenue, N. W where the 
paper is kept on flle and where Ihe Herald 
corrcsponilent will weli-ome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



Call for Kepubllcan Caucus. 

All legally iiuallflM voters who intend to 
vote for the republican candulates tor the 
various offices to t>e ttlled in the city of Duluth 
ou February 4. l!*Wi. ut the regular city elec- 
tion, aiv hereby uotitled that caucuses wili be 
held between the liours of 5 and (* p. ni.. on 
Jauuary •.*4, l!«W, for tlie purpose of electing 
delegutfS to the city republican convention. 

The places for holding caucuses and the 
numbtr of delegates to which each orecinct is 
entitled have been establlshetl as follow: 

First ward -Asa Dailey's lumber uUice. «■» 
Lake avenue south. 

Sjecoud ward— James McBeths store, Bast 
Superior street. 

Third ward. First Precinct— Ready buUdlng, 
ISe East Fir*t street. 

Second prcciucl— i«l East Superior street. 

Third pre«;inct— Kast Kud livery barn. 

Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
Street. , ■ . » 

Second pret.Inci— 319 W est Superior street. 

Third precinct— TOl West Superior street. ^ 

Fifth ward, First preciuci-ltiOo West su- 
perior street. 

Second precinct— ten Garfield avenue. 

Thinl precinct- Uei.' West .Michigan street. 

Sixth ward- i31 West .Michigan street. 

The b;isis of representation has been flxed at 
one .iclcgaie to esich Iw votes or maj <r frac- 
tion thereof east for the republican candidate 
at the last presidential election, and one dele- 
gate at large for each precinct. 

Each ward is eutitleil to the following repre- 
sentation: First ward, 4 delegates; Second 
ward. 3 delegates; Third ward. First precinct 
4 delegates; Sec<.>ud precinct, 3 delegates: third 
pre<.-iuot. 3dele4rates: Fourth ward. First pre- 

eii, - • -- •" ~ ' precinct. 4 delegates; 

XI - -: Fifth ward. First 

pri _ . - - lid precinct. 4 dele- 

gates, lu.ni prcciuct, J delegates; Sixth ward. 
3 delegates. 

James Dingw.vll. 
JOH.N H. LAVAgCE, 
P. S. A.NSEKE. 
ClIARl-ES DUNCAN, 

H. S. Lord. 
S. M. Lester. 
City KepubUcan Com. 



officers whom you know to be faithful 
and capable, you are reckless or faithless. 
And you are slack in your duty if you do 
not stir up others to do the same. 

What a record faces us today! On a 
question which concerns the future of 
the city so greatly as the creation of her 
parks, not one-fifth of the qualified 
voters of the city put in their votes. 
Where were the other four-fiftts, and 
where are they today? How many of 
the derelict ones have taken the pains 
to register? From one precinct alone 
we have the report that of a total voting 
list of 600 there were registered at the 
close of the books yesterday only I'lO. 
Such a condition of things is a public 
scandal and shame, and every voter 
should HO feel it. For your owh sake, 
for your children's sake, for your friends' 
sake, for the city's sake wake up, regis- 
ter and vote! 



Call for City Republican Convention. 

All duly elected delegates to the city repub- 
lican convention will meet In the c-ouncil room 
at the city hail. iJulutli, Minnesota, on Jan. S, 
i(«u. at 1* p. m., for the purpose of placing in 
nomination republican candidates for the var- 
ious offices as follows: Mayor; two aldermen. 
First ward; one aidermau. Second ward; one 
alderman. Third ward ; one alderman. Fourth 
ward; one alderman. Filth ward; one alder- 
man. Sixth ward. 

M. O. Hau.. Chairman Com. 



Call for City Democratic Convention. 

The city democratic convention will be held 
In the council rooms at the City Hall, Duluth. 
Minn., on Jan. iTT, l>»i, at -' o'clock p. m., for 
the purpose of placing in nomination candi- 
dates for the following offices, viz: Mayor; 
two aldermen. First ward; one alderman. 
Second ward; one alderman. Third ward; one 
alderman. Fourth ward; one alderman. Fifth 
ward; one alderman, Si.xth ward. 

All (jualihed ele».-ior<i who Intend to vote for 
the demoi'ratic nominees at the coming city 
election are hereby notitled that caucuses will 
be held between the hoifrs of 5 and f p. m , on 
Jan. 'Si. I.>S»|, to elect delegates to the city 
demoiTalic couveutiou. 

The following places have been designated, 
and each ward is entitled to the following 
numtier of delegates: 

First ward — '<Tni Lake avenue south, five dele- 
gates. 

Second ward— James McBeth's store, two 
delegates. 

Third ward— 135 East Superior street, ten 
delegates. 

Fourth ward— Office of Lehigh Coal company. 
Merchants hotel, twelve delegates. 

Fifth ward— Dowlau's livery stable, seven 
delegates. 
Sixth ward— McKay's store, three delegates. 
One delegate for each fifty votes and major 
fraction cast for E. M. Wilson for governor and 
one at large for each ward has been flxed as 
the basis ol representation, 

Chakles d'Actremost, 
Chairman City Committee. 



Uow is this, bosses of the salt trust ! 
It is put in evidence here that consumers 
here are charged for a barrel of salt $1.25 
while purchasers for shipment to out- 
side towns can get a barrel of the like 
salt for seventy-two cents. What is 
there in the position of inland towns 
which should entitle them to buy their 
salt cheaper than we can in Duluth, and 
why have you two prices for salt here, 
one for use here and the other for e.x- 
port? This is an imposition which Du- 
luth will not stand if she can help it. 
And she will kick incessantly until she 
gets even-banded justice. 



NOW RtCISTER. 

Wake up! See that your name is on 
the registry books and that you are en- 
titled to vote at the coming city election. 
Remember that today and next Tuesday, 
the 2Sth, are the only days remaining in 
which to register, and don't be counted 
out through your own fault. Note also 
that if you did not vote at the last elec- 
tion, the one determining the issue of 
park bonds, you are not entitled to vote 
at the coming election unless you regis- 
tered your name yesterday or do so to- 
day or on Tuesday next at the designated 
place for holding the election in your 
precinct. We give the list of places so 
designated by ordinance in The Herald 
today, and shall reprint it daily until 
the 29th inst. If any of these places 
have been changed without plain notice 
to this effect, the board of registration is 
gravely censurable, but even in this 
event, with a little pains, the registering 
place can be found. 

Don't lose your vote! Don't rely on 
any former registration as security for 
it! See to it personally that your name 
ia on the books! If you did not actually 
vote at the last election it will not be on 
the books unless you registered yester- 
day or today. There is the possibility of 
an omission in the transfer, even if you 
actually voted on the park bond 
issue. See to it then, without 
fail, that your name is on! 
Today the board of registration 
sits from 9 o'clock in the morning till 7 
at night. Next Tuesday it sita from 12 
o'clock noon till 9 o'clock in the evening. 
Note these hours and call within them! 
Don't lose your vote by forgetfulness or 
delay! It is your duty and the duty of 
every qualified citizen to vote, and Du- 
luth expects everyone to do his duty. 

Vote yourself and bring out every vote 
you can for the good government of our 
city. Is there any election so important 
to you personally and to the city which 
relies on your loyalty as this? You can 
prosper and Duluth can go ahead under 
a poor governor or a poor President, 
but every day your personal 
welfare and the welfare of the city will 
be hazarded or hurt by a poor city gov- 
ernment You can't afford to have such 
a government and the city can't afford 
to have it At this moment the startled 
Twin cities are on the point of striving 
with all their might to hold their own 
against the head of the lakes, and our 
neighbor across the bay is straining 
©very nerve to get even. Are you going 
to hurt yourself personally and strike a 
knife in the back of our city by reckless- 
ness or faithlessness to your trust? If 
you don't register and vote for city 



Keep on guessing, friends, for The 
Herald's two prizes! Bear in mind that 
the way is open till the census enumer- 
ators begin their work, and that you can 
guess early, late and as often as you 
please. It is only necessary to clip a 
coupon from the paper from day to day, 
write your guess and name upon it, 
varying your guess at will, and turn it 
in to The Herald as directed by mail or 
messenger or personally. Lots of 
guesses have already been put in, but 
we look for thousands more. It is a 
very simple and easy chance to try your 
skill aa a calculator or your luck as a 
guesser. and the prizes are well worth 
trying for. Fifty dollars in gold for the 
best guess, and twenty-five dollars 
in gold for the next best. First 
come, first served with the 
prizes. Guess once and guess again. 



LITTLE11CHUNK8 OF NEWS. 

Ericsou & Strom: Since we com- 
menced advertising in The Herald we 
have had a large number of inquiries 
for property, and have sold a large quan- 
tity by this means. The best place to 
advertise is in the want columns. We 
find it pavs us well to advertise in The 
Herald. 

Rev. C. C. Salter: Tlie action of the 
8chix)l board iu appointing a teacher of 
the culinary art is highly commendable. 
The instructress selected is a most 
worthy lady, of wealthy family, who is 
not doing the work for pecuniary gain, 
but from an earnest desire to work a ref- 
ormation in this important branch of 
domestic education. 

An ex -Juror: The jury that ia sitting 
on Simmons, the Tower murderer's case, 
will either disagree or acquit the pris- 
oner. Mark the prediction. 

Joshua Whitney: I never was in a 
place so large as this before where they 
didn't keep sidewalks clear of ice. Of 
course in these little towns they don't 
pretend to. These stone walks are fear- 
ful slippery unless they are kept clear. 
People are compelled by the city to pay 
for the walks; why can't they be com- 
pelled to clean 'em? 

Fred Bennett, president of the Lake 
Superior Land company: There is con- 
siderable activity in the vicinity of Old 
Superior. We have made several large 
sales the past week in 48-1.3, and there is 
not a little inquiry for property in that 
neighlxjrhood. 



MAYORALTY ACROSTIC. 



Would please the grain men: 
C. H. O raves. 
George Sp K ncer & Co. 
S. S. Lint On* Co. 

Ba K nes A Thomson. 
Orlfflths-Marsliall <» rain Company. 
Lake Superior E levator Company. 

W. S. Bl R ch i Co. 

Van D r seii-Ellot Company. 
Franklin 1* aiiie. 

Du L nth Elevator Company 
Ward Am E s. 
A. J. Saw Y er & Co. 



A hanl man to beat and strong with the 
lumberman; 

Asa D A Hey, 

Wil L Iston, Charnley Jk Co.| 
Hubbard & V Incent. 

Ole A n Land Co. 

Duncan Ere W er & Co. 

Huntress & B rown. 
J. G. Howa K rd. 

P. M. Gra A B. 

C. B. Woo i> ruff. 

A. M. Mil L er. 

P E ck Jlc Son. 

R. A. Gm V. 



EDITORS' GREAT THOUGHTS. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



"I have seen more strange and interesting 
things In Duluth than I ever saw before ir. the 
whole course ot my travels," said Gen. J. F. T. 
Anderson during his recent visit here. "I 
have seen bustling cities only a year or so old ; 
the commerce of a town increase ICO percent 
in one year; have heard stories of commercial 
development that seemed unreal, but not until 
I went to West Duluth did I bear and see the 
strangest of all. I have seen men blasting 
away stumps In order to grade a road, but not 
until I went to West Duluth did I ever hear of 
or see a municipality engaged in removing 
stumps in order to pave a street; nor do 1 be- 
lieve anyone ever heard of the like before." 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



The jubilee of King Leopold of Bel- 
gium, is to be celebrated by an exhibi- 
tion at Liege. Evidently hispteople look 
upon him as their liege lord. 

It is an interesting fact that the por- 
trait of Queen Victoria in widow's 
weeds is still used on the 3-cent and 6- 
cent postage stamps of Newfoundland. 

Two foreign women noted for their 
prowess as huntresses are traveling in 
this country, namely. Lady Marie Ede 
von Ameline, famous as a tiger killer, 
and Lady Eva Wyndham Linn, who 
slew six maneaters during a visit to her 
uncle, the governor of Nepaul. Lady 
Ameline killed four tigers in India, and 
has their claws ond skins. 

John Rogers, the New York sculptor, 
has completed in clay a colossiU statue 
of the Rev. John Eliot addressing an 
Indian man and woman. He hopes that 
it will be b<jught and placed inRioxbury, 
Mass., where ''the Indian Apostle" died. 

The last piano which Beethoven ever 
played up<3n has been discovered and 
purchased by an Austrian Beethoven so- 
ciety. The piano belonged to the wife 
of a Swiss pastor, whose father, an Aus- 
trian bookaeller, had given it to her for 
a wedding present. 

Gen. Butler has presented to the New 
Hampshire Historical society a valuable 
collection of books and papers relating 
to the early history of the state. 



Red Wing Republican: Every week 
some esteemed contemjwrarj' asks where 
is that astonishing improvement in busi- 
ness which was promise<l to occur im- 
mediately upon the election of Harrison. 
No republican ever thought of claiming 
that any improvement would occur im- 
mediately, except a better confidence 
that business would not be injured. 
Every republican knew that any con- 
siderable change due to the election of 
1888 could not possibly be felt until con- 
gress had legislated, which would not 
happen before 1890. 

Little Falls Transcript: There are 
over 10,000 loyal Masons in the state of 
Minnesota, over 800 having been added 
to the fraternity during 1889. The pres- 
ent Masonic year is A. L. 5890, or 
"Annus Lux," meaning in the "Year of 
Light." 

Had Met One of The Nameroas Hogs. 

Minneapolis Tribune-Star: "I awoke 
very early this morning," said T. B. 
Walker, as he stood on the corner and 
kicked his feet together to keep warm. 
"I was thinking how matters were pro- 
gressing in Minneapolis, and it made me 
sick to think of men whose princely for- 
tunes have been created by the rapid ad- 
vancement of values here and by the 
generous gifts from this beautiful city 
of ours, all at once becoming so sel- 
fish that they forgot the city's interest 
entirely in furthering their own ends. It 
made me sick and I felt like puUing up 
stakes, selling out what I have and leav- 
ing for good." 

Twin Help All Round. 

Little Falls Transcript: A Minneapo- 
lis man claims to have invented a ma- 
chine that will twist ordinary rye straw 
into a twine as strong and durable as 
the present binding twine and it will 
cost but $20. This machine, if practical, 
will be a God send to onr Minnesota far- 
mers. 



An Etheral Creature. 

Time: "It is a great wonder that Miss 
Serapha does not take wings and fiy 
away." "Why so?" "Because she is 
raven-haired, dove eyed, swan-throated, 
angel-formed, and — and pigeon-toed." 

BITS OF STATE NEWS. 



Getting at His Record. 
Time: Bank president— I like young 
Stylo, and I would like to make him 

cashier, but his character . Director 

— Not bad, I hope? I know absolutely 
nothing about it, one way or the other. 
Couldn't you persuade %lm to run for 
some petty political office? 



The Weather Bnlletln. 

Meteorological repoi^ received at 
Minn., 8 a. m. Jan. 22, 18»0. 



Duluth 



PL.*CE8. 



Bar. 



Ther. 



-1» 



Duluth 30. M 

Pt. .\rthur..i;» S;- 
Wl^nlpeg..i.■)0.30|— 16 
St. Vincent '^)Mi'—Vi 
Q'Appelle. ;.■>). as —18 



Assinib'ne . :ii>.l2 

Helena |:j0.t»6 

Huron, Dak. ':iu.3»i 



St. Paul.. 
La Crosse.. 
Bismarck. . 
Moorhead . 



50.86 

ao.7« 
:».12 
:3l).a> 



12 

- 2 

- i 
-30 

-10 

- 6 



Wind Rain. 

1 


Weather 


SW 1 


Cloudless 


w ; 


Cloudless 


8 





Cloudless 


8 




Cloudy 
Cloudless 


NW 




Calm 




P't cloudy 


Calm 




Cloudless 


.SE 




Cloudy 


K 





P't cloudy 


S 





Cloudless 


»K 




Cloudless 


8 




P't cloudy 



T in rain onlumn indicates trace. One (1; 
inch of rain or melted snow e<iual8 ten (10) in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (—> in temperature 
column indicates below zero. 

W. H. Fallok, 

Senreant Signal Corps 

Wa.shlvgton, Jan. "22.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending 8 a. m. to- 
morrow: For Minnesota: Fair, fol- 
lowed by local snows, warmer south- 
erly winds. For Wisconsin: Warmer, 
fair, southerly winds. For North and 
South Dakota: Light local »now», 
southerly winds, warmer. 

Had No t'se For It. 

Munseys Weekly: "Can I sell you a 
'Life of John L. Sullivan,' sir?" asked 
the agent. "No, my friend," said the 
merchant "I have no use for a scrap- 
book." 



The Mozart Soiree Musicale. 

The fifth soiree Musicale of the Mo- 
zart association of Duluth will be held 
in the Temple Oi)era house on Friday 
evening, 24th inst, at 8 o'clock. 

Admittance on membership cards, 
which must be shown at the door. A 
limited number of tickets will be sold to 
persons not members at $1 each. Said 
tickets (which admit only one person) 
can be had at Dwyer's music store and 
at the door. 

The program for this musicale will be 
made up entirely of home talent and 
by our best musicians, including Miss 
French, Madame Beauleau, H. P. Robiu- 
son, Professor Tonning and others. 



Professor H. A. Hazen of Washington 
is at Northfield under instructions from 
the government signal service to make a 
series of meteorological experiments at 
low temperature. 

An officer, said to be from St. Paul, 
having in charge an alleged murderer 
to be delivered to the German consul at 
New York for transportation abroad, 
lost his prisoner near fiatavia yesterday. 
The man jumped from the train through 
the officer's carelessness and escaped to 
the woods. 

In Stillwater are some of the most en- 
thusiastic ski men in the state, and the 
Norwegian Ski club are endeavoring to 
get up a tournament there. The hilly 
nature of Stillwater and its surround- 
ings offer the best possible chances for a 
successful meet. 

Old loggers claim there never was a 
winter when better results could be 
obtained for the work than they are at 
present The roads are perfect; there is 
plenty of snow, but not too much, and 
the swamps are solid. 

William Mitchell, a farmer living 
about six miles east of Granite Falls in 
Renville county, died under such pecu- 
liar conditions that foul play is strongly 
suspected. The coroner has been sum- 
moned and a thorough investigation will 
be made. 

The stockholders of the Flour City 
National bank have decided at the last 
annual meeting to increase the capital 
stock 31,500,000. The directors decided 
today to call for $500,000 of this increase 
immediately. 

The adjourned tertr of court, in session 
at Redwood since Jan. 6, has completed 
its work. Holden, the murderer, will 
probably be sentenced at the May term. 

A 8aving Uan. 
Epoch: Bill — What are you doing? 
Ben — Saving up to get married. Bill— 
(a year later)— What are you doing? 
Ben — Saving up to get a divorce. 



If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Notice the new bargains offered in J. 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



To Real Estate Men. 
Real estate owners and all others 
operating in Superior real estate sub- 
scribe to "Robert G. McDowell's Atlas 
of the City of Superior." 

ROBKRT McFeRBAN, 

Subscription Agent, 
327 West Superior street, Duluth. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



POLLING^LACES. 

Boundaries of Wards and I'reciacts and 
Where to Register. 

Below are given the places of registra- 
tion for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb, 4 next. 

First ward— .\8a Dalley's lunil)Or office. 
Second ward— .McBeth's grocery store. East 

Superior street. 
Third ward, tlrst precinct— All territory east of 
Late avenue to Third avenue east. Poll- 
ing place, No. IM East First street. 

Second prei'iiict— All territory between Third 
avenue east and Sixth avenue east. Poll- 
lug place, 31'J East superior strcnn. 

Third precinct— All territory between Sixth 
avenue east and Tenth av.Miue east. Poll- 
lug plac-e, corner of Sut>eiior street 
and Washington avenue. 
Fourth ward, tlrst precinct— All territory be! 
tween Ijike avenue and Third avenue west 
north of the First wanl limits. Polling 
place, Howard building, IIJ West First 
street. 

Second precinct- All territory between 
Third avenue west and Sixth avenue west. 
Polling place,4ly West Superior street. 

Third precinct— All territory between Sixth 
avenue west and Twelfth avenue wost 
Polling place, 701 West Superior street. 
Fifth ward, flrst precinct— All that part of 
Fiftli ward north of Northern Padtlc rail- 
road yards and cast of Uarfleid avenue. 
Polling place. ItilB West Superior street. 

Second precinct— All that uart of Klces 
Point south of Northern I'aclflc railroad 
yarils. Polling place, tyii Gaiticld avenue. 

Third preduct— .\ll that part of the ward 
west of Gaitleld and Piedmont avenues 
and north of the Northern Pacltlc railroad 
yards. Polling place, Urja West Michigan 
sUeet. 
Sixth ward— Polling i)Iace, No. 2231 West 
Michigan street. 

Never .Staid That Long. 

New York Sun: "Did you ever know 
Fred to come out of a saloon?" "Never. 
I have seen him go in, though." 



Feodor V. Luerzer, artist from Mun- 
ich, Vienna, has opened studio in In- 
galls block, room 13. His pictures are 
on exhibition at LaV^aque's, where full 
information can be obtained. Terms for 
painting lessons in oil, water colors, etc., 
one lesson, three hours, seventy-five 
cents; one lesson weekly, 12.50 per 
month, 

Around the World. 

There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 25,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way — by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,CX)0 miles 
in a single line? How much money they 
would cost? How many great cities and 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigate. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W, J, C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent C, 
B. Jt N. R. R, St Paul, Minn. 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root &. Co.'s ad. 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W, \. Footk A Co. 



The Herald bindery has the beet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



6PERCENTI 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 8 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Dnimproved Pfopertj. 



BUILDINQ LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



CUGUE i PRILE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 
Duluth National Bank Building. 



CHRIST IAN SC IENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table Is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick, 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



Great French remedy. Dr. LeDdc's per- 
loniCAL PILLS, from Paris, Franco, act only on 
the generative organs In females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses ( from what- 
ever causei, and all periodical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not be used during pregnancy. 
The larire pnjportion of th> ills to whU.h ladies 
are subject Is the <llrect result of a disordered 
and Irregular menstruation. Kobt. Stevenson 
&Co., (Chicago, 111., H. BoBwarth it, Co., Mil- 
waukee, Wholesale Agts. The genuine only 
supplied by Boyce & Totman. Sole Agts.. r>u- 
lutb 



DtLCWEsn 

NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Sppcifle fur Hv8t<>rin. Pi2zine<«, Fits, Neuralgia Wake 
fiilnos, Mental D<pr<'S!iion. Hofteiiinft of the Hriifn n- 
-ultintf In tn.;.-init.v and le.i<lini; tu misery <!<-■. ^v an>l 
ilealh. Premature Olil Aje. Itarreiincss. I,os.^ of J'owcr 
ink-ither i-ex. Involuntary I.o8.«es, and Spermalnrrlio'a 
aiiscd by overexertion of the brain. Kclf-nl.u^e .!■ 
Dver-indul^ence Each box rontain-' one monihV trea' 
ment. at a hnx. nr kit fi\r &■, k..n« i. ...»..{ i :■ 



k'er-indnl^i 
[",?"*■ *' » oox. or SIX for »■). hent l>y mail i.rep.iil. 
With ea<h order for hlx l.ox..«, will noml uiin ha,ier 
;riiaranteo fo refund money If the (reatmeni iaila to 
cure . Uuaranteoti insueU aiui geniunc sold only by 

Boyce * Totman, Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 
.Minn. 



GREAT ENGLISH REHBDT! 

Murray's Specific. 



"•*•*•••''' A guarantei cure for all ne r 
vous disease • such as Weak 
Memory, Loss Brain Power, 
Hysteria. Headache, Pain in the 
Back, Nervous Prostration, 
I*ucorrhcea, L'nlversal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, Impo- 
t«ncy and general loss of power 
of the Generative Organs;— In 
-— either sex, caused by Indlscre- 
BtfcwTlWIHt tlon or ovcr-exertlon,and which 
ultimately lead to Premature Tra4« 
Old Age. Insanity and t'onaump- 
tlon. 11.01) or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of. price. Full particalars 
in para pnlet, sent free to every 
applicant. Wn Ooarautee Six 
BoxeH to cure any case. For 
every 15.00 or<ler received, we 
send six boxes, with a written^^^^^^^^ 
guarantee to refund the •Doneyt!rTT?rr|TT 
if our Specific does not effect a cure. Address 
■U communications to the sole manufaoturera 
THK MUKRAT MKDICINBCO. 

Kansas City, Mo. 
Sold in OnlDth by Has Wlrtli 



Dyspepsia 

Makes the lives of many people miserable, 

causing distress after eating, wur stomach. 

Sick headache, heartburn, loss of appetite, 

a faint, " all gone" feeling, bad taste, coated 

-J. ^ tongue, atJd Irregularity of 

'"®*'®*" the bowels. Dyspepsia does 

After ^'^^ set well ot Itself. It 

Eatin<y requires carelkil attention, 

Kaxing an(j ^ remedj* like Hood's 

Sarsaparllla, which acts gently, fet efDclently. 

It tones the stomach, reg^ulates the diges- 

tlon, creates a good ap- jftlok 

petite, banishes headache, .^ j . 

and refreshes the mind. H^aclache 

" I have been troubled with dyspepsia. I 

bad but little appetite, and ^»tat I did eat 

Heart* distressed me, or did me 

DUrn would h.ave a faint or tired, 
all-gone feeling, as though I Iiad not eaten 
anything. My trouble was i^ravated by 
my business, painting. Last ftt\tt 
spring I took Uood's Bar- wOUr 
saparllKi, which did me an StOITiach 
Immense ainoimt of good. It gave me an 
appetite, and my food relished and satisfied 
the cr.ivlng I had previously •xperlenced." 
George A. Page, Watertown, Mass. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Sold by all druggists. 51 ; six for 85. Prepared only 
by C. I. HOOD ft CO., Apotheeari«% Lowell, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



REAL ESTATE. 



M i lie 1 



FOR SALE: 



50-14--ln Icreage, - 
48-]5-ln taie, 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertf, - 



M 



|UUU| 



l|UUU| 



- 1, 



Lots for Sale as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



LOANS 

MADE AT 

6, 7 AND 8 PER CENT. 



Money on Hand. 

NO DELAY. 



JONES & BRACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



SPECIAL LIST 




BARGAINS 

OFtBREO BT 

C. E. RICHARDSON. 

•» 

Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which wili be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $62,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

040 Acres near 0!d Superior 1 60 

I Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now Is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 

C. E. RICHARDSON, 

336 West Superior Street. 

COFFIIi i WtRIIEfl, 

30 FAaOUSSON BLOCK. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 6. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49-15. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 



COFFIN &. WARNER. 




W. C. SPERWOOD & CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OBNiriNE BARGAIKS IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlOei parts of the citf and 
ACRE PROPERTY AOJOININQ. 

Ail we ask Is for pi rtles to examine our list and 

compare them rith other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



J. D. & R. C. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 

ROOM "B," HUNTER BLOCK. 



K. C. QRIDLET. i. C. MISHLKB 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Room 26. Bzoban^ BuUdlng. 
List y ou r property with us at what It Is worth 
and we will sell It. We Invite everybody to 
call In and see us, and solicit oorrespondenoe 



mn je m. 

The Season of Grand 
Resolves and Sol- 
emn Vows. 



All of Which is Well in Its 

Way, but Practice is 

the Thing. 



You Can All "Get There" if 

You Try, so You ha i 

Better Try 



THE NEW YEAR'S LEAF. 



(Chicago Herald. J 
Just now is the time when the averajrc man 
Hegins to prospectively nieulallv plau. 
As the Hiiuuul swearing offseason draws near. 
Ot the leaf ho'U turn over the flrst of the year. 
Everything that is wrong from his life he'll 

e trace. 
And naught that's unjust In bis thoughts have 

a place. 
He's sure he has ixjwer all evil to shun 
When he says so and so then the business Is 

done. 
But. In onler to have his new plau broken In, 
He'd hotter not tarry a day to begin. 
And 'tis l)o8t he should not use the leaves too 

fast. 
Why not employ this year the leaf turned for 

last? 



Here we are the first of a new 
year as bright and happy as 
children with new toys. You 
have just closed up the record 
of the year I 889, and we sin- 
cerely hope the balance is in 
your favor— "by a large major- 
ity." If your expectations 
were not fully realized, we are 
very sorry indeed, and trust 
you will not think us too famil- 
iar if we commiserate with you. 
Well, never mind, don't feel 
badly because you failed to 
make the most of your oppor- 
tunities, for it can't be helped 
now. Recollect that there is 
no teacher in the world whose 
lessons are so impressive as 
Old Mother Experience. It is 
an easy thing to look back and 
see where you missed it, and 
then, too, in looking back at 
these bad breaks it seems so 
strange that you didn't know 
better. "Why," you say to 
yourself, "anyone who is half 
witted ought to have known 
better." That is true, but 
again we suggest that it does 
no good to harrow up your feel- 
ings in that way. The new 
year is spread out before you 
like a new blank book, all un- 
written. As the days go by 
the pages will be filled, one by 
one, and when the year is end- 
ed the volume will be closed 
and put away in your archives, 
and you will commence again. 
Since you commenced making 
up the book just closed, we put 
one of the finest pieces of 
suburban property on the mar- 
ket anywhere about Duluth; 
and simply because we offered 
lots at extremely low prices 
and on the people's easy pay- 
ment plan, a good many inno- 
cent and honest persons sup- 
posed that it was all a humbug 
and a cheat. We can't much 
blame them for jumping at the 
conclusion that it was outside 
farm land, instead of fine resi- 
dence property, because our 
prices were so low and our 
terms so favorable. But that 
is where many of you made a 
BAD mistake. Had you inves- 
tigated, you would have invest- 
ed, and so made money. But 
you can make amends for that 
this year. Now, in strict confi- 
dence (which we beg of you 
not to repeat), we will tell you 
something: Water works, sew- 
ers and electric lights will be 
put in at Lakeside, Lester Park 
and Crosley Park, a system of 
parks and boulevards laid out, 
hundreds of fine new houses 
and comfortable homes built, 
suburban train service greatly 
improved— although it is ex 
cellent now— and the whole 
face of affairs changed. Lots 
that now sell for $125 each 
will then bring $250; lots that 
now sell for $200 will readily 
sell at $400, and so on. It is 
hard to understand how people 
who feel assured that all this 
great growth is so near at hand 
should wait. The wayto make 
money is to get ahead of the 
crowd and buy before the ma- 
jority of people do, and before 
the developments occur. Now, 
if you want to start out the new 
year right and make a record 
with which you will be satis- 
fied, take our advice and buy 
lots in Crosley Park, and buy 
NOW. If you wan't to make 
your money go as far as possi- 
ble, and thus make the utmost 
with it, buy what you can reach 
on the easy payment plan and 
keep up your weekly instal- 
ments, and you will be delight- 
ed with the results. Remem- 
ber, you will have no interest 
to pay, and that makes quite 
a difference. 

Hoping that you will do your- 
self a kindness by following 
our advice, and wishing you all 
a most happy and prosperous 
new year— and many succeed- 
ing ones— we beg leave to sub- 
scribe ourselves 

Your real(ty) friends, 

C. E. LOe 4 CO., 



( 32 Fargusson Bldg. 



w^'4 





^Tl/e Girls aLr?d Boys 

dll t^aive tfjeir cr?oice. 



y pdTwill 1 ^^^ 

Yk\ rbaNk's SAr^TA Claus Soar 

^EBESTINTHEivouto 
• FOR ALL " 

HOUSEHOLD AND 

LAU HDRY PURPQSEft : 

MADE ONLY BY 

N. K. r-^JRRANK & CO. — Chicago. 




ASK 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DB. GEO. J. HATOOCK, 



lannirer 



Two Nghts of Meinment. 

■OllDAT IID TDESDiT, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

1 'irst appearance hero of 

W. W. TILLOTSON'S 

Me[[y Comedy Comp'y 

In the Ni !w York success of two seasons, 

ZIG ZAG. 



Presented » ith the original oast, headed by 
the charming soubrette. ANNA BOYD. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



QSTRICH FEATHERS ^Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



Sale of Be» te Thursday, Jan. 83. 

in prices. 



advance 



PEOPLES THEATER. 

DULUTf' . . JOHN a. BARNES. Mgr. 



The Best im\] Show in the Northwest 

This waek, commencing JAN. 20, 

ItORRISET « RICH'S 

AlL-STilR COMEOy COMPAHy 



ADMISSION: 

TO QALLEF Y, lOc; Pit. 26c; Orchestra chalr«, 
36c; Boxes, 60c. 



Doors open at 7:30; performance ovmmences 

at 8:30. 



THREE 



ACREAGE 



WliNlS. FOB SME. ETC 



ONE CENT A AURD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertieemcnts under this head received at 
the loliuwiutf piaccs. bebides the business of- 
Ucc ol 1 he tleraiu ; 

Kndiou Phariua<;y, 1^ Tenth avenue east. 

Itoyce Si Tutman, corner Fourth avenue 
and Superior street west. 

J. W. Melson, No. ISUl. corner Eitrhteeuth 
avenue west auu Superior slreet. 

U. Johusou, chief clerk Phillips hotel. West 
Uululh. 



w 



Help Wanted. 

ANTED— A cook for a small family, 
quire. ;tJu Kasl Second btreet. 



In 



W AN XKD— Competent rIH lor housework; 
one tliat can cook. Two In tamlly. 



Apply 
street 



Orown Brothers. 19 West Superior 



iWJSH to employ a few ladles on salary to 
lake cbar^ of my business at their homes, 
ijijfhl, very tasciuauujf and heuithlul. Wa««s 
$lu per weei. Kelereuce jriveu. Uood pay lor 
part time. Addrcijs with etamp. Mrs. Marion 
Walker. Louisville, Ky. 



WANTED— A girl lor tffneral house work; 
family ol inree. CaU In toreuoou, 411 
N inth avenue east. 



(»«/ */'\dALAKY, $40 expenses in advance. 
i^yjKJ allowed each mouth. Steady em- 
ploy uicut at home or iraveling^. No souciuuif. 
Duties delivenug and makiujj collections. No 
(losial ourils. AdOrcsa with stamp. Hater te 
Co.. Ir'iiiua. Ohio. 



w 



ANTED— Pastry cook, also other help. 
Inquire fhiiiips hotel. 



WANTED— At the Womaus Empiuymeut 
Bureau, '^il Superior street ea&l, two 
sccuiid girls and a dozen girls lor general 
house work. Employniout ubiatuud tree ot 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayers. 



tur :»al«. 
OALE OF FUHNJTUHE-Mr. E. T. FlUey. 
O being about to leave the city, will otter at 
ij.ivate sale, at his residence. No. t£i4 East 
Second Mreet, upon SaturUay, Jan. 2alh, li-om 
lU a. m. to 6 p. m., all his uouschold luruilure. 
carpets, kltcbeu uteosUs, etc. etc. 



F 



OK SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
at A. W . Eiler's 'Mi Lake avenue south. 



IT^OK SALE— Forty acres lor sale, near the 
Jj city, at *.•<( per acru«. Only tltMO down; 
balance ou time to suit purchaser. A great 
big snap lor somebody. Call ou Kricsou, Strom 
i Co. iill Pastoret-S.cuson building. 



FOH SALE— House and lot on East Fifth 
sn-eet. First divitiou. Lot .~)U.<14<J. tuouuou 
\;uui}/ terms, all Fastorel-Stcus'ju building. 



IilOU SALE— Lots 5 and ti iu block b. West 
! End addition. West Duiulh. »1U«0 lor the 
Lno. 'liicseare bargains. Call ou Ericksou 
ii, Strom, PaBtoret-SicUbon building, room :ill. 

|7^0K SALE— My residence with 60 or lOU feet 
JJ at 316 East second street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. E. A. Gilbert, 'ii Uoard ol Trade. 



IJ^Oii SALE— Four lots in Portland addition 
JC att'.ooeach. :.'U Pastoiel-stcuon build- 
lug; also twu lois uu Ccuiral aveuuc. West 
Luiuth. Tliese will be sold at a big bargain. 
Call on Ericksou <^' Strom, room :^11, Pastoret- 
Stcusou buUdtug. 



Bargains 



If taken at once. 



Lsnd situated near 




L 




HEAVV HOUSES h\)ii SALE— 16 head of 
heavy horses, raised ai Lake Para, on 
lue Northern Pacific road, lor bale by C. W. 
Harvey. Can oe seen at Howard barn, ou the 
lake shore, Minnesota point. Uesidence, SBt 
West Fourth street. 

ECU SALE— :!lii acres of pine land on which 
there IS 2,UU0,uvu teet ef pine, will be sold 
lortlMU. A snap fur souielKxly. Call at room 
■■ill. Pastoret-Stcubon buudiug. 

Ir^OK SALE— Two lots on West Second street 
' with house. Price, S:JU,uuu. Eiicks«u Ac 
Strom, room 2ll, Parsloix't-Steuoou building. 

L.ost. 

LOST— Part of a gold-link cuff button In 
shape of three rings. Lost in Superior 
Ol Duluth. Finder will receive rewai'd by 
leaving tue same at my office. Itobert G . Mc- 
Dowell, Sii V> est Superior street. 



Ifor Kent. 

FOR RENT— Two warm, comfortable rooms 
at reasonable terms. Apply £:!(> We«t 
xuichigan street. 

'L'^OU RENT— JXBlrable room; bath. gaaT 
JC steam, etc.; private family. Address S., 
Herald ollico. 



w 



Wan ted —To Kent. 

ANTED— A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. n Phoenix block. 



—THE- 



Greatest Snaps 



Board aud Rooms. 

TWO ROOMS, heated and lighted, with 
board, iu a private I'umily, $4.50 per week. 
l4 Fourth avenue cast. 



FinanciaL 

DULLTH MORTGAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount on furni- 
ture, pianos, horses aud wagons without re- 
moval from owner's possession ; also on ware- 
house receipts, bank stocks, and any property 
ot value; not*;s discounted; partial payments 
received aud your own time grauted tor pay- 
sent; no delay; money on baud aud lurnishod 
immediately after security is approved. Wm. 
Horkau, Maua^r, Room 1:2, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Minn. 



IP VOU WISH TO SELL OR BUY DULUTH 
or Superior bank stock, corporation or in- 
vustment securities, cull ou or address B. Mur- 
phiu, broker, U Banning block. Dulutl-. Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



"YT H. WILSON, ATTORNEY AND OOUN- 

J3I • scllor at Law. Will practice in State 
and cniled States Courts. All business given 

Brompt attention, 44Fargrussou Block, Duluth, 
linn. 



\ 



In the market. 



ADDRESS 



jL m JL.JL. 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



PLASTERING. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobblor 
promptly attended to. CtUoe. room D. Hun- 
ter block. 



TiTRS. J. S. DINWOODIE, 

Teacher of Piano Forte, Voloe and 81»ht 8ln«. 
lug. Chorus and Choir OouducUir. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wlgrglos'a, 16 Bast 8u 
penor street, and at residence. 121 Tenth are. E 



■jV|-K. H. PARKERBOBEiraON~ 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION. 
SMILM^LOCK. 



MCMILLKN ft 8TBBBLN8, ARCHITBCIS 
and superintendenu. Office, room No 
— , Exchange buUdlng. 



PALMER & HALL. AHCHITBCTS AND 
1 .. 8uP«rlnt»ndont«.room 4«. Bxohaii«e buiW- 
ln«. Oiihitb. Minn. E. 8. Palmer, £7*"^""" 




/ 



> 

/" 






f 



t 



i 



-... iV.l; 





\ 




7 




DULUTH EVENTNG HIXtAU) JAITOABT 22 1890. 



PUBLIC LieRARY AGAIN. 



Reasons for Appointment of a 

School Official on the 

Board. 



Hustling With Plans for 
Elegant new High 
School. 



the 



Internal Arrangement; Some 
jaof How it Will 
Look. 



Id|£ 



"I noticed in the list of appointees for 
the public library," said a gentleman in- 
terested in municipal affaire last night, 
"that the public schools were not rep- 
resented on the library board. This is 
a decided mistake. The apiKjintment 
of someone connected with tlie schools 
would streniithen the board very ma 
terially, if for no other reason that the 
8ele<.tion of the children's department 
might be well entrusted to him. Other 
benefits would accrue; for instance, the 
superintendent of schools has to pur- 
chase quantities of books for the school 
libraries, and buying in this way is en- 
abled to secure large discounts. There 
is no reason why the city should not get 
the benetit of this arrangement, which it 
undoubtedly could do, and buy- 
ing b«3th city and school 
books together would secure 
even larger discounts. I would suggest 
that the mayor, president of the council, 
or whoever has the appointing power, 
should put Superintendent Denfeld on 
the library board. He would be a credit 
to the board, an active member, and 
qualified in every way to assist in the 
verv imptirtant matter of selecting suit- 
able books. Being also a highly -educated 
gentleman, his classical attainments in 
ihim direction would render him one of 
the most valuable members of the library 
directorate." 

In an after conversation with Superin- 
tendent OeMfeld. that gentleman said he 
reahzed that it was undoubtedly an 
oversight on the part of the acting mayor 
that the schools had been ignored. lie 
deemed the appointment of a represent- 
ative of the schools as nothing more 
than an act of justice, and fully coin- 
cided with the views expressed in the 
premises. 

"Another matter which is worthy of 
consideration," said Mr. Denfeld, "is 
that of a library building. I have no 
hesitation in saying that I be 
lieve a portion of the new high 
school building could be utilized for the 
purpose of keeping the library tempor- 
arily, or at least until a library building 
is put up. For the high school will be a 
larger building than we'll need for school 
purposes for several years. I have not 
the least doubt but the board would 
sanction the use of a room or rooms in 
the new school. Tfte building will be 
verj- central and would serve excellently 
for 'this purpose. Of course the school 
library would be kept entirely sepa- 
rate." 

Being asked as to whether he would 
serve if appointed a member of the 
board, Mr. Denfeld replied that he did 
not have any great amount of spare 
time on his hands, but intimated that he 
would not object to serve in that capa- 
city. 



fore, and the color-sensitive plate is 
l>eing more largely used. Dry plates 
have improved in quality during 
the past year. American plates are now 
regularly exported where they are 
highly appreciated. The formation of 
photographic clubs has gone on, there 
now Being not less than seventy-live 
such societies in this country. The 
number of amateurs has also largely in- 
creased during the year. The great 
growth in photographic instructions, es- 
pecially through the Chautauqua 
Schools of Photography, should be men- 
tioned at this time. This remarkable 
school, founded only three years ago, 
with a membership of but sixty-one 
students at the end of the first year, 
now numbers over 150 memtors. Last 
summer at the Chautauqua Assembly 
grounds the practicing classes were 
larger, more enthusiastic, and accom- 
plished more than ever before. 

WEST END. 



ARE IN SESSION TODAY. 



The So-Called Non-Partisan 
Women of the Temper- 
ance Union 



Formally 
the 



Sunder Ties With 
Parent Union 
Today. 



THE NEW HIGH 



SCHOOL. 

What it win 



ArctUtecU Busy on the Plans ; 
be Mke. 

Architects Palmer & Hall, who are 
rapidly getting much more than a local 
reputation as designers of public schfjols, 
are busy at work on the new school and 
expect that in about two weeks they w ill 
have designs ready to submit to the 
board of education. The plans are not 
yet in such state that much deecription 
can be given, but they 

are already far enough along 
to show that the building will 
be a very handsome and complete struc- 
ture. 

The building will have the very best 
systems of heating and ventilation that 
modem science can desire. It will be 
built on saniUrj- plans, and every room 
will have what is hard to accomplish in 
so large a building, two sides to tne air, 
so as to give light in the best manner to 
scholars. 

It will have a long facade on Second 
street, broken by corner towers and re- 
oewed walls, and in the center will be 
the entrances. There will probably be 
a central clock tower. It will be of 
Romanesque or Byzantine architecture. 
Work on tearing down the old Washing- 
ton building and blasting for the foun- 
dation of the new structure will begin 
as early in the spring aa possible. It is 
expected that by the opening of the 
school year of 1891--2 the building will 
be ready for occupancy. It will cost not 
far from ei50,U0U. 



Narrowly MUsed an Kye; Other Matters of 
West Kiul Intercut. 

Charles H. Kose, timekeeper at the 
shipvard, came very near losing an eye 
yesterday afternoon. A sharp-edged 
piece of Hying steel about thr«?e-fourth8 
of an inch long struck one of his eyelids, 
and had it gone a hair's-breadth further 
it would have gone into his eye. Andrew 
Holmb, who was struck in the eye with 
a bolt a short time ago while working on 
the 101, will soon be able t« go to work 
again. 

The West End Social club will hold its 
sixth reception tonight at Normanna 
hall. The club is planning to hold a 
dress carnival soon. 

The ladies' skating race at the Parlor 
rink last night was postponed. 

John H. Davey of Bradford, Ontario, 
and Miss Clara B. Lee of Staynor, Ont., 
were married yesterday afternoon by 
Rev. E. S. Pilling at the Methodist 
church. The happy couple left on last 
night's Zenith City Short line train. 

A. H. Larsen, clerk for X. N. Oie 4; 
Co., is visiting relatives in St. Paul and 
Dakota county. 

T. A. Pinto is back from a short busi- 
ness trip to Chicago. 

Frank Smeeks of the Ross Bottling 
company is tussling with the grip. 

J. Britt, who has been the manager of 
the Garfield house for some time, moved 
with his family to West Duluth yester- 
day afternoon. Daniel O'Connell, the 
new proprietor, will completely refur- 
nish and renovate the house. 

An unknown man was brought to St. 
Marys hospital who had both legs so 
badly frozen that they will kave to be 
amputated. 

IN THI RD DI VISION. 

Property Owners ami the Prentice Suits; 
To Turn Tables. 

The property owners of that portion 
of the Third division claimed by Fred- 
erick Prentice held a meeting yesterday 
afternoon at which it was decided to 
begin suit against Prentice to quiet title 
and to carry this suit to the end. M. R. 
Baldwin, G. G. Hartley and L. M. Wil- 
cutts were appointed to see the inter- 
ested property owners and raise §25,000 
for the purpose of pushing the suit. 

Action in the Unite<i States courts to 
quiet title will be comiueneed at once, 
and the matter brought to a final issue 
as soon as possible. In view of the fact 
that three courts had decided against 
Mr. Prentice's claim, the action of some 
leading citizens in making settlement 
was severely commented on. 

Several of those present who knew 
the facts gave them and it was seen by 
all that there was little show for the 
claimant. It was thought queer that 
while a suit was pending against the 
Northern Pacific road as a holder, there 
should be so much readiness to settle. 
Some of those present were avere to 
bringing suit against Prentice, claiming 
that any action would take years, per- 
haps five or SIX, and that it would put a 
cloud on their titles and that as Prentice 
had no show anyway it was best to let 
him go ahead without hindrance. The 
views of these was, however, overruled. 



Cleveland, O., .Jan. 22.— The spacious 
Music hall was well filled this morning 
with temperance women, who had re- 
sponded to the call for a national con- 
vention for the purpose of bringing into 
existence a nonpartisan Christian Tem- 
perance union. The hall was decorated 
with appropriate mottoes, and the gal- 
lery allotted to spectators was crowded 
with ladies, who manifested a decided 
interest in the proceedinga 

Delegates were present from New 
York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illi- 
nois, Michigan, Wisconsin and many 
other states. The gathering was called 
to order by Mrs. E. J. Phinney, presi- 
dent of the Ohio non-partisan society, 
and Mrs. J. Ellen Foster of Iowa, was 
nominated for tem^wrary president. 
After the singing of a hymn and the 
offering of prayer, committees were ap- 
pointed on credentials and order of 
business, and a brief recess was taken. 

The present gathering marks a rend- 
ing asunder of the hitherto strong ranks 
of the Womens Christian Temperance 
Union, of which Miss Francis Willard is 
the head. For years past there has been 
a growing dissatisfaction among the 
members of this organization with its 
general political drift. It has been 
brought into very close relations with 
the national prohibition party, so much 
so that at the last national presidential 
convention held in Indianapolis. Miss 
Willard was one of the prime 
movers in the nominations, as well fis 
the principal speaker at the meetings. 
Not only this, but the organization has 
gone out of its way to endorse many 
foreign movements, such as woman 
suffrage, labor reform, the ecclesiastical 
emancipation of women, dress reform, 
peace and arbitration, which it is con- 
tended have no earthly connection with 
temperance. 

This policy aroused the opposition of 
a large and ' inHuential element of the 
union, and finally culminated in open 
warfare. The officers of the union were 
appealed to to ao conduct its affairs 
as to avoid all appearance of partisan- 
ship, but without result, and the crisis 
was reached at the international con- 
vention of the union held in this city a 
few months ago, when a large numl>er of 
the delegates, after presenting a protest, 
withdrew from the gathering. Subse 
quently a lengthy call for the gathering 
of today, signed by representative tem- 
perance women of Iowa, Illinois, Pen a 
sylvania, Minnesota, Ohio and Maine, 
was issued to the country. The conven 
tion proposes to bring into existence a 
union so plain and simple that any 
Christian woman can join it without any 
compromise of the controverted points 
raised by the old organization. 



BLOCKADE AT T HE SAULT. 

Ten Thousana <«r-l-oacU of Corn AwaitlnR 
Transshlpnien*. 

The passenger trains from Duluth on 
the 2ienith City Short line, on the Soo, 
from Minneapolis and the Canadian 
Pacific railroad, from the West, and from 
the North have been unusually late for 
some time past. The cause has not been 
the snowstorm, but an accumulation of 
freight at the Sault. As much as 10,000 
car loads of corn from Nebraska, coming 
via Duluth, have been lying at that 
place waiting to bo transshipped to 
Boston and other Eastern points. 

Everv man who can run an engine has 
been gi'ven a freight train, and even pas- 
senger conductors, after finishing their 
regular trips, have been pressed into 
running local freight trains before their 
next trip comes around. The right-of- 
way has l)een for about a fortnight given 
to the freight trains, and it is said that 
passenger trains are often tlelayed for a 
considerable time time till the next 
freight train passes. 

KEEP BIItIIESSING, 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guessers 
Duluth. 



on 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Now to 

May. 



TO ENTER THE NATIONAL. 



The .\ctlnics Mold an Interesting Meeting; 
Progretw of Photography. 

The Actinics held an interesting meet- 
ing last night. l"he chief subject of dis- 
cuseion was the development of negatives. 
Maj. Quinn, as usual, had something in- 
teresting to give the society. This w;is 
a camera made by himself by which 
negatives taken by various cameras can 
be reduced to the size of 3)4x4)^ inches, 
the size used in stereopticons. With 
the aid of this the major has developed 
twenty-five of the lUO views of Duluth 
that are to be made by the club. In 
order to enter the National association 
and be benefitted by the exchange of 
views, the club must prepare 100 views 
to send to other clul>8, who will in turn 
send a like number here for a certain 

time. 

The Duluth Actinics will sometime 
this spring give an exhibition of the pro- 
duct of their skill and laU^r. 

Charles Spiro, an amateur photogra- 
pher of New York, has invented a novel 
device for developing plates m open day- 
light or white light of any kind. It is a 
method of transferring the usual plates 
from their boxes into a plate-holder, and 
after the exposure into a developing 
compound that neutralizes the effects of 
the active rays of light. 

Some excellent photographs were ob- 
tained by the American expedition dur- 
ing the recent eclipse. The effect was 
much obscured by clouds. 

"Great progress has Ijeen made in pho- 
tography during the past year," said a 
member of the Actinics today. "Cellu- 
loid, as a substitute for glass, has evi- 
dently come to stay. It has been made 
BO thin that large' sheets may easily be 
coated and roll^ upon the roll-holder 
for exposure. Celluloid has also been 
adopted by the manufacturers as a 
material well suited for making focussing 
screens and other articles requiring 
great lightness and strength. Magnesium 
is now used most extensively for illumi- 
natisg subjects by artificial light. The 
new principle in heliochromy, intro- 
duced by Frederick E. Ivee of Philadel- 
phia, should be mentioned. Lantern 
slides and photo- micog raphe are being 
miade in greater numbers than ever b«- 



The Trouble of the .Hurdocks. 
Dr. O. N. Murdock, now of Minneapo- 
lis, but lately of Duluth, is sued by his 
wife now in Duluth for divorce. Mrs. 
Murdock charges in her complaint that 
the doctor, anticipating the suit, has 
been disposing of his property in such a 
way as to make it impossible for her to 
get alimony. The doctor says of the 
suit: "We' were married thirteen years 
ago, and have lived together until about 
a year ago, when my wife left me. I 
have always provided for her liberally 
for her and our child. She can have her 
divorce, but the question of alimony or a 
part of my estate will be fought. There 
has been nothing improper in my actions 
and my wife will find it impossible to 
prove allegations." 

An Annual Meeting. 

The nineteenth annual meeting of 
Pilgrim Congregational church was held 
last night. Owing to the illness of many 
and the intense cold there were hardly 
250 people in the pleasant parlors of the 
church. Tables were spread and a very 
excellent supper was served. After the 
supper the regular annual business meet- 
ing of the church was held. Reports 
were read, the final accounting of the 
building committee showing that the 
church had cost $56,000, and officers 
were elected. The subject of branch 
churches, a visiting committee, deacon- 
esses to visit the afflicted and poor, and 
various other subiects of growth were 
touched on and discussed. The salary 
of the pastor, who is in point of service 
the oldest Congregational pastor in Min- 
nesota, being in his seventh year, was 
increased $300. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth postollice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters.] 

There has always been great interest 
attached to the figures of population of 
Duluth. This will l)e esiieciaily the 
case this year, as the last government 
census gave us a total of 3740 people, 
and it is almost certain that no city in 
the United States has ever shown such 
a percentage of growth as will Duluth. 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" is meant 
the city proper. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
purposes i)art8 of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will offer 
prizes to the two persons guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessers two 
cash prizes. 

First Prize $j>0 In Oold, Seeonil Prize $25 
In Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this otlice 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



Duluth's Bund Issues. 

A total of $1,102,000 is the extent of 
the bonds which the city can issue. So 
far $948,000 have been negotiated. This 
includes the $3C3,000 for park purposes, 
authorized out not yet issued, and the 
$10O.0C0 recently issued through Hayes 
& Son. This will give the city a chance 
t<j negotiate another $15O,C0O. If 4 per 
cent for the $300,000 for park purposes 
can be Hoated it will give the city $:}12, i 
500. If they are -k^i per cent bonds it 
will make a difference of $3O,C0O to 
$50,0C0. The limit of bonds will be in- 
creased after another city assessing, but 
many of the bonds are simply permanent 
improvement floating fund and are paid 
back by property owners. 

Big Lumbering Operations 

That this is a favorable winter, in 
spite of the lateness of the arrival of the 
snow may be inferred from the fact that 
the skidding of Hall & Buell's logs is 
almost finished, and the hauling well 
advanced. The cut will be about 50,- 
000,000, which will be to supply the 
company's two mills at Manistique, 
and Bav Mills. A camp at Au 
Sable Point, near Grand Marais, will 
furnish two-thirds of this amount. 
Much of the aupplies for the Hall-Buell 
camps were supplied by the Wells-Stone 
Mercantile company of Duluth. 

The Lost Bwoksof The Bible. 

Rev. J. S. David will lecture at Bethel 
chapel this evening on the "Growth of 
Revelation." He will give some account 
of the lost books of ancient revelation 
quoted in the Bible, and will explain the 
law of Bymbols and correspondences. It 
is one of his most instructive lectures 
and has been received in other places 
with great enthusiasm. Questions will 
be answered at the close. Everybody 
welcome. 



THESE ARE S POHTS. 

Two In .Seattle Fight tor Business; Notes 
of the Ulamond. 

Se.\ttle, Wash., Jan. 22.— One of the 
most brutal fights seen in this state, 
took place at IJullards, a suburb of Seat- 
tle, between two laborers named Avery 
and Callahan, who fought to settle an 
old grudge. There were no seconds or 
timekeepers, the men mutually agreeing 
to strip U> the waist and tight till one 
was whipped. 

The tight took place in a hall and 
lasted over forty-five minutes, neither 
man appearing to get any advantage. 
They were compelled to stop from shere 
exhaustion. Avery was terribly beaten 
about the head and body, and is now in 
bed suffering his injuries. He is sup- 
posed to be injured internally as he has 
been spitting blood. Callahan though 
severely punished, is able to be around. 

Sporting Notes. 

Next season the association umpires 
will be obliged to wear uniforms. 

Since the organization of the league 
the total amount of salaries paid to 
players, at a conservative estimate, will 
exceed $3,300,000. 

McQueery, Childs and Keefe of the 
Syracuse Stars may be found with the 
Louisvilles next season. 

Connie Doyle, the third baseman, is 
the vice-president of a temperance organ- 
ization in Holyoke. 

Most of the players are even now 
vearning for the opening of the season, 
the crop of advance money is better this 
winter, however, than was ever known in 
the history of the game. 

Manager Cushman says that young 
Knauss of Detroit is the Ijest left-handed 
pitcher he ever saw, and decidedly su- 
perior to any south paw of the present 
day. 

The Washington-Baltimore deal is not 
dead, but is simply slumbering. The 
chances are yet bright that Baltimore 
will be one of the clubs in the National 
league next season. 

With St. Louis, Louisville, Toledo and 
Columbus in the West, and Rochester, 
Syra(;use, Brooklyn and Philadelphia in 
the East, the American association can 
boast of a good circuit. 

The desertion of Paul Cook was some- 
thing of a blow to Louisville, especially 
as he was one of the best men left to 
the club since Mr. Davidson wrecked it. 
Cook has signed with the Brotherhoo<l 
club that is to play in Brooklyn. 

A telegram received from 'Frisco yes- 
terday states that Jack Dempsey has 
consumption, and that he will never be 
himself again. 

A story comes from San Francisco 
that a market gunner in San Diego last 
season, with one gun and 18,000 shots, 
killed 12,000 quail. 



Population Contest Coupon. 

My guess as to the nunil)er of Inhabitants 
In Duluth. West Suluth, Lakeside and 
Lester Park to be shown by rcturus of tlie 
census enumerators In tlie summer of I'^lH) 
la as follows: 
Whole number of Inhabitants — 



Name of guesser- 



Kesidence of guesser- 



Date. Jan. 99. 1800. 



Cut out this coupon, make your jfuess iii>on 
it and send It to The Dally Herald. All guesses 
must bo made on this coupon. Only one guots 
allowed to a single coupcm. In case there shall 
be two or more answers of the same iiu in tier, 
which number is nearest or next to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winners shall Ik?, in either case, the ones whose 
coupons bear the earliest date. • 

Address all answers lo 

"Gdess " care The Dally Herald, 
Duluth. Mlun. 

Miv «erve aa a Qulde. 

In order to give data that Is of Interest and 
may be of value. The Herald reprints the fol- 
lowing from the directory report ol ltt«U, but 
it must l>e remembered that this paper does 
not vouch for th'i accuracy of the opinions set 
forth or the Bguros (riven : 

This volume contains 3,;WB more names llian 
the last issue; a total of lti,XiU adult citizens of 
Duluth: this sum multiplied by 3X, the factor 
which has been found to truthfully represent 
the women and children not included in the 
list. Indicates a population 4)f 4»i,i«i) for Du- 
luth, a gain of lO.OUU inhabitants within a year, 
and the prediction is ventured that If a lull, 
complete and accurate count be made liy ex- 
perienced and competent canvassers, nearly 
«i,iXMl 84)uls will be found within the corpo- 
rate limits of Dululh in IfW. 

Population by Years. 
1880, United States census . :<,*V0 

1886, sute census ',2'^11 

1888, directory estimate ^5,000 

1887, dlrect<jry esiiniate 30,liU0 

1888. directory estimate 37,U(K) 

1889. directory estimate 47.800 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



B 



A COLD 



The 



WAVE- 

Lowest Tern- 



R 



O 



Obserrer Records the 
^ perature of the Winter. 

This morning the thermometer 
dropped down to the lowest point it 
has reached here yet this winter, the 
minimum for the past twenty-four hours 
being 19 below zero. The cold wave 
has been taking a southern tour. At 
La Crosse it was 22' below this morning, 
and correspondingly cold throughout 
southern part of the state. The indica- 
tions now are for warmer weather in the 
next twenty-four hours. Yesterday it 
was 18 below zero, the maximum dur- 
ing the day being 3 below. , 

For Poor Relief. 

The present cold weather is having the 
effect of bringing in the applicants for 
poor relief. Superintendent Paul says 
that while there has been cfjnsiderable 
increase in the number of applicants for 
wood and groceries, the percentage is 
fully 2.5 per cent lower than last year at 
this time, when the weather was not as 
severe as now. 



T 



H 



E 



RO 



W 



ESTABLISHED 1 882. 



Hotels. Restaufants, 



-AND- 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 






CREAM 



^ 



Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
eentory. It is used by the United States Government. Endorsed by the heads of the 
Ofgtt Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthful. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 

nV YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO. 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



HUMPHREYS' 

UK. Hi Mi'UHEVs'SrK.riKu s arescuutltloally au<l 
carefully prcpartnl pr<*»orli)tlou« ; used for many 
ycirslaprlVHtt'iiractlcf with Huco'ss.aiid for oviT 
thirty yi-nrH used by the pt-opli'. Every Blii(?le Spe- 
clflo Is a sp<'cial euro for the rtl8ea»e named. 

Th'i'se .Sp«<<'lllcs cure without dniKKlnK. purg- 
ing or reduiiiig the Hystem, and are in fact and 
deed the Hovereiirii remediea of the World. 



UST OF PRWCIPAL HOS. CCRE8. 

1 Fevem, ConKc^tlon. Inflammation .. 
3 Wormn, Worm Kever, Worm fi.lie 

3 i'ryiDit ('olIc.orTcfthlUK of Infants 

4 Diari-hcn, of children or Adults ... 

5 bynenUTV, Urlplng, BIUoub Colic... 

6 t'h«»l«Ta MorbuH, Vomiting 

7 CuukIih, CoUI, UrouchltlB 

f< NcurnliciH, Toothaclie, Kaceache — 
H I|cHda( hen, siek Headache, Vertigo 

10 IlyMpepwia, lUllous Stomaeh... ^ 

11 Supprenned or Painful Periods. 
I'i Whiten, too I'rof lise I'erlods 



PRirKS. 



1.3 Croup, CiniKh, ninioullHreathlnn 
1 I f-iilt Kheum. KryKlpelas, Kruutli 
ItheuinatlHtii, Khednmtlc I'alns 



\ uoe, (htllH, Mal&rlu — 

l or Hli><d)ng 

Cold In the Head 



KryKlpelas, Kru^itloiiR. 
1.5 Itheuinatl 
1 (i Fever and 
17 I'ilew, "'tr. 

lit (iitarrh, Iiifluenrji, 

•20 Whoopinu Cough, Violent CoughB. . 
■it <;.nernl l»el)llity,:hyBlcalWeakneM . 

•27 Kidney OiHeBHe .• 

•^S NervouM Uebillty v. ; *• 

BU I rluury Weakne»», WelttonBed. . 
-.* UlHeaiieaof theIleart,PalplUUonl. 

Sold by Druggists, or Bent postpaid on receipt 
•f price. Dr. Hi'mphreys' SlAStiL. (14-1 pages) 
richly hound In cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Humphreyn' MedlclneCo. It* Fulton St. > Y. 

SPE CI F I C S . 



HARWOOD'S 

Citj Iranspoffation Freight and Expres?, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue West, 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 



17 First Avenue Weat. 



SCHILLING'S OBCHESTRIl 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 




Ifiiee Valuable and Nice-Lpg Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



L BE SOLO VEBy CHEIIP -:- 




(&Q OO Best Set 
a>O.L. U"of Teeth. 

CULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 



Koom 1-7, 406 West Superior Street 



PariruAAon Bl.xik. 



Dulutb 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

U the largest In the 8tate of MlD neflota ou ttde 
of the Twli Cltl« 



ROOM 4U miOREI-SIEIISOII BLOCK, 

DULUTH, ■ MINN. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY. 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every way. Newly rofltiod. 
Finest sample room in town. Livery in 
eonnectlon. WILl lAM GRANT, Prop 

Open November I, 



-ALSO- 



1 




1 




__j 


■* 










■ 














, 








• 







TlifeG Good Building Lots on Hinth Street, 



NEW HOTEL. 



-THI> 



MET 




<ior. 



St. Paul, Minn., 

4th nnd fVawhlnfrton M*. 



On Cable Car Line. Bent Table 
west Kates »3.00 aud I P warils 
W 



in tlte Noiia 
U.~BABin:B. Manager. 



Mortgages Negotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. 




A LOT 



Near Third avenue east 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



-IN- 



BLOOK 12, 



of 
lu- 



Lowest rates for all sizes and (frades 
security. Before borrowluK elsewhere 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank, 
NATIONAL BANK BUIl DING. 




L 



FIRE INSUKANCE. 



THE SPALDING. 



e. p. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



MICHIGAN STREET, 



Stfictl^ First-Class in all Ippointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



FOR S 




Apply by letter or In'person to 



" E D ," 



C^f^IKE lE^IEIEB^fL-I^ID- 



R. KROJANKER. 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 



-AT- 



N 



R 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root &. Co. '8 ad. 



m 



J. 



The Mosart Huaicale. 

The coming tnusicale of the Mozart 
association will be one of the most in- 
teresting the society has yet given. 
Liocal talent only will take part, and 
some very enjoyable selections will be 
given. 




TAKE NOTICE! 

Wo are agen's for the celebrated 

Green Point Ciiina 



The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and vou will be per- 
fectly satisfied. 



19 West Supeiiot Sheet. 



Notice to Contiactois. 



Scaled proposals will bo received up*' 
o'clock p. in., .January :Jutti, 1h»i, by E. ... ^^- 
ferson, ohairmiin of committee on court house 
aud county Jiiil. for tlie cell work in the new 
county jail, in accordance with plans, speclfl- 
cations drawn by O. (J. Traphageu, architect, 
on file at the office of the county auditor. 

Bidders will siwcify wliat <)uality and 
strenirth of chramc steel they proi>08e to use, 
and sul.mlt sample of same, thev will al8<j 
submit drawiiiKS or samulcsof locks and bars 
they propose to use. and all mechanical de- 
vices connected witli the c^ells. 

Eacli proposal must be acct)mpanied with a 
check for live hundrc<l dollars to be forfeited 
to St I>ouis county, in the event tliat the pro- 
posal which said check accompanies shi.ll be 
Jicceptcd by tlie county commissioners, and 
that the jierson making the proposal shall lail 
to comply with its terms „ „ , _ , 

Address all proiwsals to B. R. Jefferson, In 
care of county auditor. Duluth, Minn, l-or 
further Information apply to 

John F. Schlecnbs, 
Superintendent. Duluth, Minn. 

The commissioners reserve the right to re- 
ect any and all proposals. 

14.1S-21-24-->Jan 1-1-8-11-15-18-22. 



Below Mi Price 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and dyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty, tm- Good worknn * i- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



209 East Superior Street. 



Duluth, Minn, 



If taken at once. 



Lol sold next 
property for $335. 



this 



40 




40 



-AT- 



P. V. DWYER & BROS. 

Telephone 170. 
207 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



1 



IVIEIVIBERS OF THE 



DEDTH CLEARING HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 



NOTIC[TOST[llMFIIT[RS 



Sealed proposals will be received until 2 
o'chKik p. m .^January 39th, 1R80, by E. R. Jeffer- 
son chairman of commlttw on court house 
and county Jail, for the steam-heating apjiura- 
tus in the new wjunty Jail, in accordance with 
plans and spccitlcatioiis drawn by O. O. TYar 
phageti. arcliiiect, on flle at the office of the 
county auditor. 

Each proi»osal must be accompanied with a 
certified check for two hundred dollars, to be 
forfeited to St. liouis County In the event that 
the proposal which said check aecom; anlos 

pU(d by the county commissioners. 

iKTw^n miikinir the nroposal shall 



shall l>e ii<;o 
and that Ih 



fail to comply with Its terms. 



Address all proposals to E.K. Jefferson, In 
careof county auditor, Duluth, Minn. 

For further information apply ^"> John F. 
Schtenuci'. fuivoriutcndent, Dulutli, Minn. 

Tlie commissioners reserve the right to reject 
any and all proixjsals. 
Dec 14-l»-21-24-2SJan l-i-8-lH5-l»-«. 



Address 



LS„ 



Postoffice Box A A. 



American Exchange Bank 
Btll &. Eyster's Bank 
Fist National Bank 
Security Bank 
State Bank of 
National Bank 
Marine Bank 



of Duluth 

Duluth 

of Commerce 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1 ,000,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100,000 
260,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10.000 

1 00,000 

26.000 



O. G. 



i 



TRAPHAGEN, 

^RCHITECT, 

Rooms 510. S11 and i]l Duluth Union national Bank Building. 



f 



■ ■ i ^ Ej i'* w «■» 



ir 



iii 4 ^ ' ii 



-*^ j ? 



:*Wi*l &i. 



II * ■' v mmmt^ 




t" 




WCTLUTH EVENING HERAMX JAIOJAIIY 22, 1890. 



The Course of Prices in a Dull 

Market on Duluth's 

Board. 



Gossip of the Boards; Daily 

Movement; Prices on 

Stock. 



There" was a much firmer feeling in 
wheat circles today and prices ruled >4 
to }i higher than yesterday's close, but 
business was dull and quiet all the ses- 
sion. Cables were easy and exports 
small. The receipts at all points were 
lighter. Sellers were much scarcer and 
generally very firm in their demands. 
The close was firm but quiet. 

Cash No. 1 hard did not sell; it closed 
at 78fj'. No. 1 northern closed % up at 
TG^j, and No. 2 northern closed at 73. 
January No. 1 hard closed at "3 4; No. 1 
northern at "tjj-j. May oi)ened ^4 up at 
83?8. sold up to 8332, dropped off >8, re- 
covered and closed at S3>j. May No. 1 
northern closed at SO}^. 

The Day'K Movement. 

Cars on track here: Wheat 8, com 25. 
There were no receipta or shipments. 
Inspection: Wheat, 6 cars No. 1 hard; 
16 cars No. 1 northern; 1 car No. 2 
northern; oats, 12; total, 35. Minneapo- 
lis cars on track 116, against HO yester- 
dav and 184 a week a^jo. Receipts there: 
67,280 bu. Shipments: Wheat, 16,820 
bu; tlour, 12,1*26 bbls. Chicago cars on 
track: Wheat 41, corn lo3, oats 93, rye 
8, barley 21). 

Chlcaco GoAriip. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. \V. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler Jt Lewis: 

Chicago, Jan. 22.— Wheat: Market 
fairly active and firmer. There seemed 
no adequate cause for the strength, ex- 
cept tile buying of tardy shorts who 
failed to get ashore on yesterday's break. 
There was some buying on a telegram 
from California that heavy rains were 
injuring crops, but this was considered 
a joke by intelligent operators who un- 
derstand that this IS always the rainy 
season and that without it their crops 
Would be failures. There were stories 
on the fioor about the saall stocks of 
wheat in southern Russia. The close 
was strong, with indications of a higher 
opening tomorrow, m which event we 
believe short sales will pay. 

Corn: L>uii, but firmer on estimated 
small receipts for tomorrow. 

Provisions: Fairly active, firm and 
higher. The idea that Armour is a 
large holder and is bullish not only 
started shorts to cover, but induced long 
purchases by operators inclined to "tail 
OQ." Selling of pork was chietiy from 
commission houses, who were supposed 
to belong fur New York and foreign 
account. 

>'ew Vurk stocks. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New Vork stock exchange as reported by 

Xtl XV Dill i. f.^ . 



The I.»borlte» Knilorse » Candidate; What 
May Itesult. 

A decided Iv new phase to the political 
question has developed during the past 
twenty-four hours. The struggle for the 
mayoralty is likely to take place in the 
convention, and not at the polls, that is, 
taking for granted that the republican 
candidate, whoever he may be, is sure of 
election. A candidacy on the part of H. 
W.Pearson was first announced yesterday. 
And on this account the Pearson forces 
were active last night in massing sup- 
port. Mr. Pearson evidently has a vast 
number of friends in Duluth, this fact 
is plainly evidenced by the free, even 
glad, recognition given his name yester- 
day and today. He is a candidate with- 
out political debts to pay or promises to 
carrv out and is especially strong. 

Last night also the labor organi- 
zations, in secret session assembled, en- 
dorsed A. W. Bradley, the lum'oerman, 
for mayor. .Vnd through this, it is said, 
Mr. Bradley has consented to have his 
name used in connection with the mayor- 
alty candidacy. 

This, then, narrows the 

battle down to a struggle in the 
convention. Through a careful 
canvass made today by The Herald, it is 
evident that the support of Mr. Bradley 
and Mr. Pearson is about equal, so far as 
the outspoken choice of business men 
can be relied upon. 

While Mr. Bradley has received the 
labor endorsement, and while a petition 
in his favor is now in circulation, he 
himself but two or three days ago en- 
dorsed the name of H. W. Pearson, who 
is an associate on the school board, and 
stated that he would assist Pearson if 
the latter decided to run, so it is quite 
IKWsible he will not come out. If either 
man goes before the convention with 
much strength the other will withdraw. 
There certainly will be no siiuabble be 
tween them. 



A Great Hive of Animated In- 
dustry is the Iron Bay 
Works. 



Casting Next Week; Some Gen- 
eral Notes of a Busy 
Day. 



CITY BRI£F8. 



W. W. Bill Jb Co.: 

Today. 

Cb' ■--- "^ - "zton* Qulncy. 107^ 

A I Oil 27*^4 

M 73^ 

N preferred T4H 

C- -KeeiSt. Faul.. apS 

S - a6>» 

G 474 

L- V .SashTiUe «6\ 

(-■ Northwestern Ill 

K 1 «5V 

!-»« . • - .>.._1«M% 

Beadmtf 38 

Teau. e>jai and iroa )io^ 

HiehmuDil Termuial 21 

AtctiL<4^D .31>, 

De;iiw<ire i Lackawuioa 137 

Mew Kajflaad 45^ 

Lea/iTr-u-: a^tS 

ion m' 



\\- 
C 
W- 

Oil 



:ic 

central. 



.107^ 



rester- 

da}'. 

Iff; 

74 
74^ 

ess 

64 ^ 

*6H 
>«S 

llOii 
86^ 

1U5 

21'. 
31 '^ 
13«>« 
45 

a»?» 

»4', 

66 'i 

34^ 

107)* 



Mlnnewpolis Cloae. 

lLuiMKAPot.18. Jan. iJ.—Cli>9log quotations: 
Mo. 1 hard, Januaiy. 79; tebruary, 7l<; 
May, fi:-^: on tricfe, 7V»4. No. 1 northern, 
JanuaOi.. 77: February, 77; May, 7^^(i^'<(j; on 
tnck, ..I'-Jii- So. i northern, January, 73; 
February. 7i: May. 77: on track, 7Ad75. 

Chicago Clo«e, 

Chic.*oo, Jan. ii, 1:15 p.m. close.— Wheat 
Arm. January, 7'i-*; May, (<0\. Corn, steady; 
January, 2V; May, ol^. 



PERSONAL. 



Mrs. C. B. Nimmo went to Detroit, 
Mich., tonight for a short visit. 

Mr. H. M. Myers left for Philadelphia 
today. 

Mr. H. E. Long went Eiast on a three 
week's trip last night. 

Mr. Olaf L. Roen, who went down to 
St. Paul a few weeks ago to visit his 
brother-in-Law, A. K. Teisberg, hasboen 
very ill with the influenza. He is much 
better now and is e.xpected back tomor- 
row. 

Mr. A. S. Chase, secretary and treas- 
urer of the Duluth Street railway, went 
to St. Paul last night to be absent a 
couple of days. 

Mr. E. T. Turner, agent of the Adams 
Express company, is dangerously ill 
with pneumonia, superinduced by the 
grip. ^^^^^ 

Mr. G. Elphinstone Mercer, London, 
England, is a guest at The Spalding. 

Messrs. H. C. Bellinger and George 
Watts of the city engineer's ofiice left 
for Utah this morning, where they will 
engage in railroad work for the Union 
Pacific railroad. 



ReeUter Rexume. 

At The Spalding- L B. Keiper, Lan- 
caster, Pa.; W. D. Fargo, F. G. Prince, 
C. A. Travis, Oscar Short, J. C. HUl, H. 
Allenburg, St. Paul; Perry Landis, A. C. 
Main, S. G. Miller, R. E. Lidgerwood, J. 
M. Regan, H. J. Lewis, Chicago; W. 
Nevacher, Cleveland; A. Carlsruh, MU- 
waukee; J. Collett, Terra Haute; W. W. 
Maffhers, Philadelphia; J. A. Carson, 
Boston; A. J. Van Engers, New York. 

At the St. Louis: S. E. Adams, Min- 
neaoolis; E. P. Putnam, North Branch; 
J. F. McGraw, York, Pa.; H. Zimmer- 
man, E. E. Hatch, St. Paul; S. Mitzer, 
Milwaukee; C. J. Schnabe, Huntington. 
W. Va. ^ 

At the Merchants: Neil B<jwie, 
Tower; P. H, McMahon, St. Paul; G. W. 
Browniqg, Minneapolis; K. T. Quale, 
Pelican Rapids; James Carlson, Winni- 
peg; E. N. Bolman, Reading, Pa.; H. 
Doney, Faribault. 



Better KeKiHtration. 

The voters are braced up a little to- 
day in registration. In the Second pre- 
cinct of the Third ward there have been 
sixty fi ve names added, and about the 
same number in the Third precinct of 
the same ward. In th»» other precinct 
there has been a corresponding move- 
ment, and by tonight the libts will be 
very materially add^ d to. The working- 
men are rallying, and ever>' voter of this 
class will l>e on the lists by next Tuets- 
day night. 



A. J. Brock of West Superior has pur- 
chased the stock and good will of Bige- 
low Jc Co., who have been doing busi- 
ness in the Wieland block. 

C. J. Petre of England, E. J. Purcell 
and Henry Fee of Canada, and Hugh 
McCallum of Scotland received first citi- 
zenship pa)>ers this morning. 

Clan Steward will hold its regular 
meeting tomorrow night to attend to un- 
finished business and to complete ar- 
rangements for the banquet and Burns 
celebration Friday night. 

Directors of the National Bank of 
Commerce held a meeting yesterday 
afternoon and elected the following ofli- 
cers: President, John .\. Willard; vice 
president, Chas. E. Shannon; cashier, E. 
VV. Matter; assistant cashier, G. F. Mac- 
kenzie.' 

John Brown and John Fye, two plain 
drunks, were duly committed to the 
county jail this morning. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
14 below; 3 p.m., 8 below; 6 p. m., 7 
below; 10 p. m., 11 below; 7 a. m., 16* 
below; 9 a. m., 17 below; 12 m., 11 
below. Maximum, 7 below. Mini- 
mum, 17' below. Daily range, 10'. 

There are only sixty civil cases on the 
docket for the present term in the mu- 
nicipal court. This is one of the light- 
est terms for years, and is partly ac- 
counted for by the fact of the time of 
year and that district court is in session. 
There is a case of scarlet fever at 
1410 West Eighth street, au infant, 1 
year old. 

This afternoon the installation of offi- 
cers elect of the Womans Relief c"orps 
occurred. Mrs. Milham, post-president 
for the department of Minnesota con- 
ducted the ceremonies. 

Frank Brown, a switchman in the St. 
Paul i Duluth railroad yard, lost three 
fingers of his right band while making a 
coupling last night. Much sympathy is 
expressed for the unfortunate young 
man. He has a wife and three little 
children. 

J. W. Johnson, a laboring man, aged 
30, died at St. Marvs hospital of pul- 
monary tuberculosis. Johnson was an 
Icelander, and had no relations here. 

Victoriii GovreliwUzki, infant of a 
Polish family living in Cascade square, 
died last night of croup. 

A STRO NG SP EAKER. 

Mr, Burdick I'titi. tin- reuiperance Ques- 
tion in Struni; Li^ht, 

P. A. Burdiik addressed a good audi- 
ence at the First Methodist Evangelical 
church last evening. 

He opened his address by repeating a 
remark he heard a young man make 
during the day, that he had no interest 
in such things, and from that text he 
emphasized personal and individual re- 
sponsibility in such a manner as to bring 
it home to each one in his audience. He | 
showed that we are responsible for all 
our acts, and that every act tells either 
for good or evil. The man or woman 
who either drinks socially, or encour- 
ages the pra<,tice, is doing more harm in 
a community than all the saloons are 
capable of doing. And, again, many who 
do not drink give sanction to the" habit 
by a lack of positiveness. Everyone 
who disapproves of the drinking customs 
of society ought to have manhood 
enough to let it be known. 

His discourse was intersperced with 
numerous anecdotes, of which he has an 
unusul fund, from which he draws liber- 
ally, and one remarkable feature is that 
he never repeats himself, but on every 
occasion gives something new. He will 
speak there again this evening. 

ANOTHER LAND COMPANY. 

riie Lake Superior Laud Company Will 
File Articlei* Soon, 

A new land company has been formed 
by a syndicate of D'uluth capitalists. 
The name is the Lake Superior Land 
company, and it is formed with the view 
of buying, selling, investing and dealing 
in real estate. February 20 is the date 
fixed for the beginning of its existence, 
which is limited to twenty years. The 
amount of capital stock is $.yj,0UO. and 
the limit of indebtedness is placed at 
810,000. The incorpf>ratorH, with but 
one exception, are well-known citizens 
of Duluth, and all the names are a guar- 
antee thatthe incorporation will besound 
and that its affairs will be conducted on 
business principles. 

The incorporators are a.s follows: E 
W. Matter, F. Bennett. Fred Koors, 
.\nton Gronseth, John Olson, D. K 
Pearson, J. A. Brayton, C. A. Phelps, J. 
B. Cotton, all of Duluth, and C. A. 
Wright of Humofjldt, Iowa. The direct- 
ors and officers are: President, F. Ben- 
nett; vice-president, J. B. Cotton; treas- 
urer, E. W. Matter; secretarj-, J. A. 
Brayton; directors, A. Gronseth, D K 
Pearson and C. A. Phelj^j. The com- 
pany will deal exclusively in lands at 
the head of Lake Superior. 



The interior of the Iron Bay works is 
aseuiuing the appearance of a vast work- 
shop. The machinery which is arriving 
daily from Marquette, is being rapidly 
fitted to its proper place, the offices of the 
company, with their three large vaults 
are finished, and the foundry men are 
making preparations to commence cast- 
ing the first of next week. The engines 
which stand ready to propel the machin- 
ery, are of the company's own make the 
largest of which is the Corliss pattern, 
and is given the name of the Iron Bay 
Corliss. 

The firm of Saeger & Gunniss of thp 
West Duluth brickyard, expect to manu- 
facture from 5,t)00,000 to 6,000,000 brick 
the coming season. 

W. B. Cross, tlie bookkeeper for the 
Iron Bay company, is expected from 
Marquette today. 

It is rumored that a prominent young 
merchant of the town will uesert the 
ranks of the bachelors when the full 
moon again makes its appearance. 

Geo. Walts, late timekeeper at the Car 
works, left today for Utah where he will 
take a position in the civil engineering 
department of the Union Pacific. 

Michael Lacy, one of Paddy McDon- 
ald's workmen, was struck on the head 
by a piece of frozen earth yesterday 
afternoon and received a severe scalp 
wound. 

lieal estate men report a quiet realty 
market. 

John Peterson, the tailor, who slipped 
and badly sprained his ankle several 
weeks ago, has recovered sufficiently to 
again be found at his place of business. 
.\ workman by the name of Campbell 
was overcome by gas at the Car works 
last evening, and required the services 
of a physician. 

Charles J. Scbwable arrived from 
Huntington, W. V^a., lastevening to work 
in the paint shop at the Car works. He 
is an expert car painter and was sent for 
by W. D. Klingle. foreman of the paint 
shop. 

The managers of the Car works have 
had some difficulty in obtaining a good 
wheelman for the foundry, and the sup- 
ply of wheels has not been equal to the 
demand. This has delayed the work 
somewhat and necessitated thelayingoff 
of a number of the carpenters this 
week. Two hundred extra wheels have 
been ordered from Chicago but they 
have not yet arrived. 

Engineer Patton is establishing grades 
on all streets and avenues in the Third 
division. 

Negotiations arei)ending for the trans- 
fer of Phillips hotel from the present 
management to Mr. Edison of Glencoe. 
The deal will probably be consummated 
ttnlay. Mr. Edison is an experienced 
hotel man and the reputation of the 
Phillips will not suffer at his hands. 

The people will be generous towards 
that West Superior man who reports 
West Duluth matters for Ihe News, and 
who stated in this morning's paper that 
150 men were engaged in placing ma- 
chinery at the Iron Bay works. It \fi 
second nature to a West Superior man 
to raise figures. 

See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. M.\CFARLu\J(K & .\tSTI.N, 



Monday, Jan. 27 

Is the day we begin to make PRICES sell 
FINE HATS AND MEN'S FURNISHINGS. 



Remember we will sell 



THE VERY BEST GOODS 

AT 

THE VERY LOWEST PRICES 

KILGORE & SIEWERT. 



Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 



St. Louis Hotel Block. 



ONEOTA PARK! 



ON THE MARKET JAN. 15. 



This beautiful property lies just above Oneota, and is about three-quarters 
of a mile from Short Line depot. It is platted topographically; large sized 
lots, 33x125 feet; the view from it splendid; the prices are low, and the 
terms are the very best. So situated that all city improvcnents must enhance 
its values. 



Call at Our Office and Examine Plat. 



MACFARLilNE & AUSTIN, 



WEST DULUTH. 



HARRIS BROTHERS, 

DULUTH 



TAKES D UDLEY 'S PLACE. 

A. B. Plougli Matla General Manast^r; Oll- 
Hllan AImu KiiieH. 

A. B. Plough, general manager and 
passenger agent of the St. Paul 4 Du- 
luth road, has been app<jinted to posi- 
tion made vacant by the death of Gen- 
eral Manager E. L. Dudley. Mr. Plough 
has been with the St. Paul & Duluth 
road for nearly two years, and has shown 
himself to be a railroad man of unusual 
ability. The company could have 
chosen no one more capable of carrying 
out its policy than Mr. Plough. Mr. 
tiiltillan, special passenger agent, is 
spoken of strongly for the general pas- 
sengership. Mr. Plough came to the 
road with the late manager from the 
Central Iowa. 

For the past few days Duluth roads 
have drawn a large increase in freight 
earnings over the tirst ten days of De 
cembtT, and the outlook for a brisk 
spring business \h excellent. 

The Omaha's statement for the year 
ending Dec. 31, is ready for publication. 
Tho company now ojwrates 1400 miles. 
Total cars in service 8^1. The Omaha 
has improved its Duluth terminals but 
slightly during the past year, one mile 
of yard tracks having been laid. Several 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



— Ain>— 



INSURANCE 



Rooms 1 , 2, Exchange Bldg. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



LOST-Watt-h charm, A. O. U. W. badge. 
Finder will l)e liberally rewarded by re- 
turning It to G. T. Porter. 2 East Superior 
81 reel. 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Patclflo Short Une. 

DULUTH T0 8UPRKI0H. 



TODAY'S 



WEDDINGS. 

Ualuth'a 



Fonr Kecome Two; Ualuth'a Society 
CoiipleH Are Joir.ed In Matrimony, 

Married, at 11 a. m., at the residence 
of the bride's family, 117 East Third 
Btr^jet, by Rev. C. K." Capron, Mr. C. E. 
Richardeon, formerly of the firm of Rich- 
ardson, Day & Co., to Miss Ada E. Eva, 
a young English lady who has resided in 
this city for the past four years. The 
young couple left at 12:35 over the East- 
ern for a short visit to St. Paul and Chi- 
cago, They will Dturn to Duluth and 
reside at 128 West Third street. The 
wedding cerenionies were ai^cording to 
the form of the Epi-scopal church, only 
the families of the bride and groom beiqg 
present. The contracting parties are 
well known in Duluth. Mr. Richardson 
was formerly with Richardscm, Day & 
Co., the real estate firm, and is one of 
the most prosperous of the voung busi 
ness men of Duluth. Miss Eva has re- 
sided several years in this city, and is 
one of Duluth's many charming society 
girls. 

Mr. A, L. McGregor, with C. E. Lovett 
&. Co., will be married this evening to 
Miss Cora Little, daughter of Mrs. D. 
E. Little of this city. The ceremony 
will be performed at the residence of 
Mrs. Little, by Rev. E. M. Noyes. Only 
the families of the bride and groom will 
be present. The couple will take the 
night train over the Eastern Minnesota 
for a trip to St. Paul, Minneapijlis and 
Chicago. Both Mr. McCiregor and Miss 
Little are very well known and highly 
respected in Bo<;ial circles. 



RxM^pt Sunday. .. 
Rxcept Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday . . 

new bridges have been built near here, i Uaily '...".".; '.;!.'!".!; 
and the road bed iiaproTed. This year, ' Except Sunday 
it is expected, will see some costly de- 
velopments in the lake terminals of the 
road, especially in West Duluth and in 
extensions. 

The total lo<;al earnings of the road 
for the past twelve months were $334,- 
:-15.98— S-.:J0.7:J0.50 in freight received 
and sSli.3,T7"J.-18 on freight forward. The 
cash for shipments for Octoljer were the 
largest of the year, amounting to 8'21, 
G46.lt>, February showing cash for re- 
ceijfts of ^0,5.14.73, The total freight 
carried for lo<ral business amounted to 
117,899 tons, of which 51,073 tons were 
forwarded and 00,22(5 received. The 
largest amount forwarded in any one 
m jnth was 10,035 tons during October, 
the largest receipts having been 20,445 
tons. 



Dully.. 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday. 

^>aily 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday. 



Leave 
Duluth 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



6 Warn 

7 35 am 
«fif) am. 

10 00 am 

11 :i5 am 

1 10 pm 

2 15 i>m 
3*.iiipm 
.1 :iO pm 
4 0Opui 

4 :i5 pm 

5 40 pm 
ti V) pm 
7 16 pm 
9 ai pm 

11 10 pm 



6 4fi8m 

7 Uam 
ii 10 am 

10 16 am 

11 W am 
128 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 

4 50 pm 

5 55 pm 
7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
»45pm 

U27 pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



6 52 am 
K (B am 
» 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 
I 36 pm 
2:n pm 

3 47 pm 

4 25 pm 
4 57 pm 
02 pm 
"07 pm 



115 8 pm 



8ITFKRIOH TO DTTLCTB. 



Look TIiIh I'p. 

A double corner on the upper side of 

East Second street in Endion. Price for 

this week, 82000. 1., cash; balance in 1 

and 2 years. D. H. Steven.ho:* & Co., 

43 Exchange building. 

nJ- A. Hoggs offers three very fine 
budding lots in I^ukeside very cheap 
and on easy terms. 



TEMPLE OPEMA NOTES. 



O. Selleck, agent of the "Zig-Zag" com- 
pany, is in the city. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Reed, two excel- 
lent comedians, have retired from the 
"Zig-Zag" company. 

"Zig-Zag" is a farce comedy that has 
Ijeen remarkably successful. Miss .\nna 
Boyd i)lay8 the stjubrette part, and is 
eHpecially good. The other parts are 
taken by Misses Mari* Brockle, in a Ger- 
man volksong; .\lice Vane, Evelyn 
Temple, Mita Stanley, Dot Neville and 
Lucy Mitchell, and Samuel Reed, Chas. 
Phillips, Will II. Bray, Alfred C. Wheel- 
an, (Jeorge Kyle, Frank Fisher and 
George Clark. 



Clan Stewart announce that their 
Burns Anniversary Banquet in St. Louis 
hotel on Friday first, will commence at 9 
o'clock sharj), wlien supper will Ijeserved, 
to be followe<l by the program a^' 
printed. Schillings full orchestra will 
furnish tho clance music. Tickets for 
the whole entertainment 82 each, admit- 
ting lady and gentleman, may ' be had 
from members of the Clan. 



.Skatiti); Kacv i'«stji<iiied 

.\t West End Parlor Skating rink, 
Twenty-first avenue west an<l Superior 
street. The race between the Misses 
Bertha Stevens, Carrie Kennebrook, 
Annie McKee and Mattie Lester, which 
was postponed last evening owing to the 
extreme cold weather, will take place 
Thurs<lay, Jan. '23. This will be an in- 
teresting race and nil should make it a 
point to attend. The ladies will skate 
ten laps around the rink for a prize of 
85. Race called at 9 o'clock. Music by 
French band. Come one, come all, and 
see the four little ladies skate. Admis- 
sion: (ients, 25 cents; ladies, 15 cents; 
(children, 10 cents. Don't forget the 
grand masquerade on skates Saturday 
night. " . • . . . 



Dally 

Except Sunday.., 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 
Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Daily , 

Dally 

Except Sunday . . . 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally. ...A 

Dally 

Bxe(!pt Sunday... 

Dally 

Except Sunday. .. 



Leave l Leave 
Superior! W. Sup'r 



00 am 



8 10 am 

9 85 am 

10 46 am 

11 05 am 
is 35 pm 

1 45 pm 
260 pm 
4 06 pm 
6 05 pm 



610 pm 

7a)pm 

1146 pm 



6 46 am 

7 07 am 

7 40 am 

8 17 am 
932 am 

10 55 am 

11 16 am 

12 42 pm 
1 52 pm 

3 00 pm 

4 15 pm 

5 12 pm 
ttlOpm 

6 17 pm 
T»Upm 

1152 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 
7 23 am 

7 55 am 

8 36 am 

9 48 am 
It 10 am 

11 30 am 
KWpm 
•J 07 pm 

3 16 pm 

4 30 pm 

5 ;J0 pm 

6 25piD 
« 35 pm 

7 46 pa. 

12 10 am 



St. I'aal ft Duluth Kallroad. 



c n eg 



Leave Duluth.... 800am 210pm 1000pm 

Arrive St. Paul. . aaOpm 0*5 pm fl 55 am 

Ar MinncapollB.. 2 65 pm 7 20 pm 7 15 am 

Ar Stillwater 3ilOpm 7 05 pm 7 00 am 

Ar Milwaukee.... 4 15 am fi 46 am t7 05 pra 

Ar4:;hloa<ro 700<tin It 30 am t+7 00 pm 

ArSt. Louis 5 05 pm 5 05 pm am 

ArJiansasClty . ^ 4 46 pm 4 4 6 pm 8 46 am 

♦Except Sunday— toother points dally. 



B 
of 



ff 



Leave Duluth 

Leave West Superior.. 

. Iamivc 8up€'rior 

Everybody should mask, as there Arrive Stillwater 



Chloasro, HU Paul, MinneapoUii 
It«Uw<»T. 



A Omnha 



are three good prizes to be given away. 

T. M. Erickhon, Prop, 
Capt. S. G, JoH.vao.N, Manager. 

Don't forget the grand masquerade on 
skates at the West End Parlor Skating 
rink Saturday night. Everybody should 
mask, as there are three good prizes to 
Ije given away. 

.SpeelHl Notice, 

The republican caucus for the First 
I)recinct, Third ward, will be held in the 
Ready building, 120 East First stret^t. 



Arrive St. t'aul. 
Arrive Minneapolis. 



Bx Sunday 



10 45 am 

11 10 am 
11 20 am 

5 :i2 pm 
00 pm 
6«0pm 



Dally. 



10 00 pm 
10 26 pm 
10 36 pm 
7 0<) am 
6 66 .am 
735 am 



Home* for Mechanics. 

I have s'jiiie fine lots for sale within 
ten minutes' walk of all the works at 
and near West Duluth at reasonable 
prices andJternis.L .■ J. A. liacr.H, 
3.'i|I'^arguHf>n Building. 



Highest of all in Leavenmg Power.— U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889, 



For an KveniuK's ri<-,Lsiire. 

The Third Assembly ball takes place 
this evening at The Spalding. As no 
dances have taktjn place recently it is 
expected a large number will be present. 
Hoares orchestra furnishes the mus'c. 




BeJiing 
Pomler 



ABSOLUTElJir PURE 



I am offering a few good bargains in 
residence lots near where the fiouring 
mills are to be built. J. A. BotiOH, 

.35 FarguBon Building. 

Danrliiir and I>ep<irtinent. 
Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. ll.'J 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; Imlies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

We have a house of ten rooms, goo<l 
well and cistern, size of lot 50x150, on 
East Second street, at a remarkable bar 
gain. To anyone wanting U) buy a home 
this is your opijortunity. 

D. H. Stfivf.nson & Co., 
43 Exchange buildijig. 

Nature In Conviilaion 

Is terrific. Volcanic eruptions, cyclones, 
eafthqiiakes are awfully and tremend- 
ously pictureH<|ue, but scarcely desirable 
to emulate in action and effect by the 
administration of remedies which i)ro- 
duce con /ulsion and agony in the ab- 
normal portion of the human frame. 
Such is the effect of the old fashioned 
violent purgatives happily falling more 
and more into disuse, and of which Hos 
tetter's Stomach Bitters is the whole 
some, pleasant and far more efre<.itive 
succedaneum. They weakened the in 
testines- the Bitters invigorates them. 
They left the bowels inactive, because 
incapacitated by ensuing feebleness. 
The Bitters, on the contrfury, and l>e- 
cauBo it enables, not forces, them to act 
—a vast and fortunate differentje — per- 
petuates their activity and regularity. 
The liver is beneficially stimulated, as 
the kidneys also are, by this medicine, 
which easily conquers, also, malaria, ner- 
vousness and rheumatism. 



licare Duluth 

Ii<;uve WeKt Superior... 

l/eave Sujierlor 

Arrive Chippewa Falls,. 

Arrive Eaii Claire 

Arrive .MadiHon , 

Arrive Mllw.HUkee 

Arrive Chicago 



oal 



cago lo- 
ll, daily 



10 45 am 

11 10 am 
11 20 am 

6 10 pm 
5 50 pm 
t 39 am 

7 4<) am 
7 00 am 



Trains arrive at Duluth. Daily. 

From Euu Clairo, and Chifiaaro 6 26 pm 

FiumSt.I'auliiiiiI Miiitieu|)<)liH 700am&626 pm 
Gkokoe M. Smith, Oen'l Aift., 



Duluth & Iron Raoge Railroad. 

Comm«^ncln(r Dec. 15, l«8!t, Duluth & :iron 
Kanio< railroafi pimseiijrer trains will arrive 
auil ik'part f nnii Union depot. Duluth. dally, 
SuiKlavH exc'epto<l, as foilowB: 
No. 1. leave Union de|>ot for Tower 

and Ely 810 pm 

No. 2. arrive Union depot from Tower 

and Ely 1202am 

Fn;l»:lit trains arrive and depart from En- 
dion station lis follows: 

No. 3, leave Kndlon 9 60 am 

No.4,arrlve Eudion 606pm 

BUBUKUAN TRAINS— GOING NORTH. 

Daily except Sun<layH. 

iMuve Union Depot— 6:60, 7:46, 8:44^1, 9:36 a, 
m.: 12:15,1:45.2:46, 4:10. 6:116. «:10, 8:05,10:00, 
11:20 p. m. 

Sunday trains leave Union depot 9:30, a. m., 
12:;i.'i, k:(X), 3:20.6:30, tl,-80,«:16 p. m. 

DOING SOUTH. 

Dally except Sundays. 

Leave I/esUT I'ark fl:ao. 
10:15 a.m.; 1:15.2:1.'., 3:40, 
and 10:S0 p. m. 

Sunday trains leare Lester Park 10 a. m„ 1:05 
8:60. 6:Ui. 6:00 and 7:46 p. m. 



7:20. 8:16. 9:10 and 
4:35.6:36. 7:40. 8:36 




*; 



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OUR GREIil SHCRIPICE SIILE 




Will continue Filteen Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no tio-ure. WE 

MUST REDU(DE, even at a great loss. 

Our low prices have caused us to meet witli 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence," Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire .stock; besides 
you would not step to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an olegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ 1 13. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ 1 13. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $i 5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us ovei stocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 




M. S. BirRROWS2& CO. 



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pm POEL CO. 



WEATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. 22 . —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours coTHmencinQ 10 a.m,. 
today: Warmer; fair weather. 

Obsekvkk, Signal Ofiice. 



COAL 



CROSS CREEK LEHICH, 

FREE BUHNINC, 

AlIHRIiClIE I BIIOI^INOUS. 



I>ry Maple, 

Hard Mlxe<l, 

Slabs, 

K<l);iii|;H, 




COHHELLSyiLLE 
And GAS HOUSE 



mm PBOMPTiy delivered 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



NOT THE WKTHffl BOT THE LOW PRICK 



P 



t 



P 



That are selling so many Winter Overcoats at the 
Big Duluth. 
quick," and 
Clothing at 



They have cut the prices 
will sell you anything in 



••to the 
Winter 



ACTUAL COST PRICES. 



They are naming prices you can't resist. 



Office: Hotel St. Loais, 326 W. Superior St. 



YARD: 



rhlrd ave. east. 



DOCK. 

Qarfield Avenur, 
Rices Point. 



SPECIAL 



BARGAINS 



Special Biifgains in Boys' and CJiildien's Suits and Ovefcoals. 



'BitDiiim 



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p 



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I 




WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



160 Acres in 9-49-15. 



80 



40 



320 



9-49-15. 



1-49-15. 



35-48-15. 



48 



80 

■ 15. 



Water Front, 



2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $ I 750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $2000. 



LOUIS LANA 



Formerly clerk with Chas. Schiller, at his old stand, 26 
West Superior street, has opened at 

28 WEST SUPERIOR ST.. 



With a complete stock of 



/ 




V rth«m Pacific Railroad. 



DlnltiK ('are on PaoiUc 
KxprcM Trulns. 



8.30 pm 



fa<;inc BzpreBS (llmltod) for 
Kanro, Holona, llutto, Ta- 
Mjina, Sl'AVHb and roKland, 
Oranil Forks, Qrafton, Win 
iiip«ir 

Dakota Rxpresn, for Fergus 
FallH, wahpoton, "argo, 
jainectown and lutormedlate 
pblntii 

C'lilciMtn'KxpPfHH, for Ashland 
Mlllwaukco. Cbicaffo and al! 
WlM-oiiHlu Centrul and Mil 
waiikr'c. Lake Shore & West 
em points i4.00 pm 



I,eavo Arrive 
Uulutb DuJuth 
Dally, j Dally 



Terms on Houses, 1-4 Cash, Balance 
U and 3 years at 8 Per Cent. 



npoiled and Domestic Cigafs 



SMOKERS' ARTICLES, 



Fine Cut and Plug Toliaccos, Etc. 



> 



Don't forget the number, 



28 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, 



fl.liB pm 



7.15 pm 7M am 



IDMva 



All trains daily. Ttaroug'h sleeper frttir 
Dululh on Dakota express InavInK at T:l/> r 
ni. Free 0»lonUt 8le<'per8 ar-j run on Paclifi 
Kxpress Icavlnfr Diilntii at 3::ii) p. ni. 

JNO. C. KOinNt^ON, 
Ticket Airent, Union Depot. 



H. P. MILLS. 



411 AND 411 riBSI NATIONiiL eHIIK BUIlDIIIG, 



LOUIS 



LANA, 




FWH3W, jii W 11 t,mi0imn 



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